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1. Richardson-Burns SM, Hendricks JL, Foster B, Povlich LK, Kim DH, Martin DC: Polymerization of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) around living neural cells. Biomaterials; 2007 Mar;28(8):1539-52
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  • [Title] Polymerization of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) around living neural cells.
  • In this paper, we describe interactions between neural cells and the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) toward development of electrically conductive biomaterials intended for direct, functional contact with electrically active tissues such as the nervous system, heart, and skeletal muscle.
  • We introduce a process for polymerizing PEDOT around living cells and describe a neural cell-templated conducting polymer coating for microelectrodes and a hybrid conducting polymer-live neural cell electrode.
  • We found that neural cells could be exposed to working concentrations (0.01 m) of the EDOT monomer for as long as 72 h while maintaining 80% cell viability.
  • PEDOT could be electrochemically deposited around neurons cultured on electrodes using 0.5-1 microA/mm(2) galvanostatic current.
  • PEDOT polymerized on the electrode and surrounded the cells, covering cell processes.
  • The polymerization was impeded in regions where cells were well adhered to the substrate.
  • The cells could be removed from the PEDOT matrix to generate a neural cell-templated biomimetic conductive substrate with cell-shaped features that were cell attracting.
  • Live cells embedded within the conductive polymer matrix remained viable for at least 120 h following polymerization.
  • Dying cells primarily underwent apoptotic cell death.
  • PEDOT, PEDOT+live neurons, and neuron-templated PEDOT coatings on electrodes significantly enhanced the electrical properties as compared to the bare electrode as indicated by decreased electrical impedance of 1-1.5 orders of magnitude at 0.01-1 kHz and significantly increased charge transfer capacity.
  • PEDOT coatings showed a decrease of the phase angle of the impedance from roughly 80 degrees for the bare electrode to 5-35 degrees at frequencies >0.1 kHz.
  • Equivalent circuit modeling indicated that PEDOT-coated electrodes were best described by R(C(RT)) circuit.
  • We found that an RC parallel circuit must be added to the model for PEDOT+live neuron and neuron-templated PEDOT coatings.
  • [MeSH-major] Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic / chemical synthesis. Biocompatible Materials / chemical synthesis. Neurons. Polymers / chemical synthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Mice

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  • (PMID = 17169420.001).
  • [ISSN] 0142-9612
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomaterials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomaterials
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / F32 NS054618-01; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / N01-NS-1-2338; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / T90-DK070071-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Polymers; 0 / poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS16763; NLM/ PMC1941689
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2. Yang H, Gumucio DL, Teitelbaum DH: Intestinal specific overexpression of interleukin-7 attenuates the alternation of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes after total parenteral nutrition administration. Ann Surg; 2008 Nov;248(5):849-56
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  • [Title] Intestinal specific overexpression of interleukin-7 attenuates the alternation of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes after total parenteral nutrition administration.
  • OBJECTIVE: Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), with the complete removal of enteral nutrition, results in marked changes in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) function and phenotype.
  • Previous work shows that TPN results in a loss of intestinal epithelial cell-derived interleukin-7 (IL-7), and this loss may play an important role in development of such TPN-associated IEL changes.
  • METHODS: To further understand this relation, we generated a transgenic mouse (IL-7), which overexpresses IL-7 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells.
  • We hypothesized that this localized overexpression would attenuate many of the observed TPN-associated IEL changes.
  • RESULTS: Our study showed that TPN administration led to significant changes in IEL phenotype, including a marked decline in the CD8alphabeta+, CD4+, and alphabeta-TCR+ populations.
  • IEL basal proliferation decreased 1.7-fold compared with wild-type TPN mice.
  • TPN administration in wild-type mice resulted in several changes in IEL-derived cytokine expression.
  • IL-7 mice given TPN, however, maintained IEL proliferation, and sustained normal IEL numbers and phenotype.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that specific intestinal IL-7 overexpression significantly attenuated many IEL changes in phenotype and function after TPN administration.
  • These findings suggest a mechanism by which TPN results in observed IEL changes.
  • [MeSH-major] Interleukin-7 / metabolism. Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism. Intestine, Small / metabolism. Lymphocytes / cytology. Parenteral Nutrition, Total
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens, CD44 / metabolism. Blotting, Western. Epithelial Cells / cytology. Epithelial Cells / immunology. Flow Cytometry. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Models, Animal

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  • (PMID = 18948814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 2R01-AI044076-09; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-08; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-09; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD44; 0 / Interleukin-7
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS63923; NLM/ PMC2597497
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3. Gao F, Sui D, Garavito RM, Worden RM, Wang DH: Salt intake augments hypotensive effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4: functional significance and implication. Hypertension; 2009 Feb;53(2):228-35
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  • [Title] Salt intake augments hypotensive effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4: functional significance and implication.
  • To test the hypothesis that activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel conveys a hypotensive effect that is enhanced during salt load, male Wistar rats fed a normal-sodium (0.5%) or high-sodium (HS; 4%) diet for 3 weeks were given 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4 alpha-PDD), a specific TRPV4 activator, in the presence or absence of capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 blocker, ruthenium red, a TRPV4 blocker, or TRPV4 small hairpin RNA that selectively knockdowns TRPV4.
  • 4 alpha-PDD (1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg IV) dose-dependently decreased mean arterial pressure (P<0.05).
  • HS enhanced 4 alpha-PDD-induced depressor effects as well as 4 alpha-PDD-mediated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P (P<0.001).
  • Ruthenium red markedly blunted (P<0.001), whereas capsazepine slightly attenuated (P<0.05) 4 alpha-PDD-induced depressor effects in HS and normal-sodium diet rats.
  • Ruthenium red alone increased baseline mean arterial pressure in both HS and normal-sodium diet rats with a greater magnitude in the former (P<0.05).
  • Western blot analysis showed that HS increased TRPV4 expression in dorsal root ganglia and mesenteric arteries (P<0.05) but not the renal cortex and medulla.
  • Gene-silencing approach revealed that TRPV4 small hairpin RNA downregulated TRPV4 expression leading to blunted 4 alpha-PDD-induced hypotension (P<0.05).
  • Thus, TRPV4 activation decreases blood pressure in rats given a normal-sodium diet.
  • HS enhances TRPV4 expression in sensory nerves/mesenteric arteries and TRPV4-mediated depressor effects and calcitonin gene-related peptide/substance P release such that HS causes a greater increase in blood pressure when TRPV4 is blocked.
  • Our data indicate that TRPV4 activation may constitute a compensatory mechanism in preventing salt-induced increases in blood pressure.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Pressure / drug effects. Hypertension / prevention & control. Hypotension / physiopathology. Sodium Chloride, Dietary / pharmacology. TRPV Cation Channels / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / metabolism. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Disease Models, Animal. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Ganglia, Spinal / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism. Male. Mesenteric Arteries / metabolism. Phorbol Esters / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Ruthenium Red / pharmacology. Salt-Tolerance / physiology. Substance P / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19075100.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Phorbol Esters; 0 / Sodium Chloride, Dietary; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / Trpv1 protein, rat; 0 / Trpv4 protein, rat; 11103-72-3 / Ruthenium Red; 24928-17-4 / phorbol-12,13-didecanoate; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; 83652-28-2 / Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; LFW48MY844 / capsazepine; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96829; NLM/ PMC2729143
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4. Pfleger BF, Kim Y, Nusca TD, Maltseva N, Lee JY, Rath CM, Scaglione JB, Janes BK, Anderson EC, Bergman NH, Hanna PC, Joachimiak A, Sherman DH: Structural and functional analysis of AsbF: origin of the stealth 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid subunit for petrobactin biosynthesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2008 Nov 4;105(44):17133-8
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  • [Title] Structural and functional analysis of AsbF: origin of the stealth 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid subunit for petrobactin biosynthesis.
  • Petrobactin, a virulence-associated siderophore produced by Bacillus anthracis, chelates ferric iron through the rare 3,4-isomer of dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHBA).
  • Most catechol siderophores, including bacillibactin and enterobactin, use 2,3-DHBA as a biosynthetic subunit.
  • Significantly, siderocalin, a factor involved in human innate immunity, sequesters ferric siderophores bearing the more typical 2,3-DHBA moiety, thereby impeding uptake of iron by the pathogenic bacterial cell.
  • In contrast, the unusual 3,4-DHBA component of petrobactin renders the siderocalin system incapable of obstructing bacterial iron uptake.
  • Although recent genetic and biochemical studies have revealed selected early steps in petrobactin biosynthesis, the origin of 3,4-DHBA as well as the function of the protein encoded by the final gene in the B. anthracis siderophore biosynthetic (asb) operon, asbF (BA1986), has remained unclear.
  • In this study we demonstrate that 3,4-DHBA is produced through conversion of the common bacterial metabolite 3-dehydroshikimate (3-DHS) by AsbF-a 3-DHS dehydratase.
  • Elucidation of the cocrystal structure of AsbF with 3,4-DHBA, in conjunction with a series of biochemical studies, supports a mechanism in which an enolate intermediate is formed through the action of this 3-DHS dehydratase metalloenzyme.
  • Structural and functional parallels are evident between AsbF and other enzymes within the xylose isomerase TIM-barrel family.
  • Overall, these data indicate that microbial species shown to possess homologs of AsbF may, like B. anthracis, also rely on production of the unique 3,4-DHBA metabolite to achieve full viability in the environment or virulence within the host.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacterial Proteins / chemistry. Benzamides / metabolism. Hydro-Lyases / chemistry. Hydroxybenzoates / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bacillus anthracis / genetics. Bacillus anthracis / metabolism. Crystallography, X-Ray. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Mice. Models, Molecular. Operon. Protein Conformation. Shikimic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Shikimic Acid / chemistry. Shikimic Acid / metabolism. Structure-Activity Relationship

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  • (PMID = 18955706.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] PDB/ 3DX5
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / HHSN266200400059C; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01-AI-40059; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U54 AI057153; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U54 GM074942; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U54 GM074942-04S2; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U54AI57153
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Hydroxybenzoates; 0 / petrobactin; 27655-56-7 / 3-dehydroshikimate; 29MS2WI2NU / Shikimic Acid; 36R5QJ8L4B / protocatechuic acid; EC 4.2.1.- / Hydro-Lyases; EC 4.2.1.10 / 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2579390
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5. Huang W, Rubinstein J, Prieto AR, Thang LV, Wang DH: Transient receptor potential vanilloid gene deletion exacerbates inflammation and atypical cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Hypertension; 2009 Feb;53(2):243-50
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  • The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) channels expressed in sensory afferent fibers innervating the heart may be activated by protons or endovanilloids released during myocardial ischemia (MI), leading to angina.
  • The infarct size was greater in TRPV1(-/-) than in WT mice (P<0.001) 3 days after MI, and the mortality rate was higher in TRPV1(-/-) than in WT mice (P<0.05) 7 days after MI.
  • The levels of plasma cardiac troponin I; cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6; chemokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-2; and infiltration of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, and myofibroblasts; as well as collagen contents, were greater in TRPV1(-/-) than in WT mice (P<0.05) in the infarct area on days 3 and 7 after MI.
  • These data show that TRPV1 gene deletion results in excessive inflammation, disproportional left ventricular remodeling, and deteriorated cardiac function after MI, indicating that TRPV1 may prevent infarct expansion and cardiac injury by inhibiting inflammation and abnormal tissue remodeling.

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  • (PMID = 19114647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-1beta; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / TRPV1 protein, mouse; 0 / Troponin I; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96833; NLM/ PMC2669745
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6. Kaski JC, Consuegra-Sanchez L, Fernandez-Berges DJ, Cruz-Fernandez JM, Garcia-Moll X, Marrugat J, Mostaza J, Toro-Cebada R, González-Juanatey JR, Guzmán-Martínez G, SIESTA Investigators: Elevated serum neopterin levels and adverse cardiac events at 6 months follow-up in Mediterranean patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Atherosclerosis; 2008 Nov;201(1):176-83
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  • We sought to assess whether plasma neopterin levels predict adverse clinical outcomes in Mediterranean patients with non-ST elevation (NSTE) ACS, i.e. unstable angina (UA) and NSTE myocardial infarction (MI).

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  • (PMID = 18336825.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1484
  • [Journal-full-title] Atherosclerosis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Atherosclerosis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 670-65-5 / Neopterin; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
  • [Investigator] Fernández MC; López García-Aranda V; Cabrera R; García de la Borbolla M; Toro R; Sancho Jaldón M; Fernández-Bergés D; Zaro MJ; Alzugaray R; Veiga M; Cordoba A; González-Juanatey JR; Grigorian L; Bassante P; Martín Jadraque L; Guzmán Martínez G; Martín Luengo C; Sánchez PL; Moriñigo JL; Castro Beiras A; Mosquera I; Montes Orbe PM; Eguía Astobiza I; García-Moll X; Martí MM; Barriales Alvarez V; Lee Hwang DH; Carrasco Sánchez FJ; Tobaruela A; Santos JM; Delgado S; Santos C; Villaroel MT; Capdevila A; Limiñana C; Castillo Domínguez JC; Sotillo Martí J; Dallí E; Martinez ML; Moreno MT; Castillo Lueña E; López-Bescós L; Jiménez J; Vallés Belsúe F; López Granados A; Diago Torrent JL; Marcos Gómez G; Sogorb Garrí F; Payá Mora E; Valls A; Muñoz Aguilera R; Serrano Sanz JA; Pascual Hernández D; García Robles JA; Pérez de Juan Romero M; Mostaza J; Lahoz C
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7. Li YN, Zou DH, Gu M, Mi YC, Wang JX, Qiu LG: [The role of BCR/ABL isoforms in the presentations and outcome of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients]. Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi; 2009 Jun;48(6):481-4
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  • [Title] [The role of BCR/ABL isoforms in the presentations and outcome of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the difference of clinical characteristics and outcomes between different isoforms of BCR/ABL in adults with Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • METHODS: The data of 106 adults with Ph+ ALL diagnosed in our hospital from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2007 were reviewed.
  • The difference of clinical characteristics between different subgroups of BCR/ABL was compared and their relation with outcomes was studied.
  • RESULTS: The median age of the 106 patients was 34 years and the median white blood cell count at baseline was 28.5 x 10(9)/L.
  • Comparative analysis demonstrated that patients in p210 group had an older age, higher blood platelet count (BPC) and more frequent occurrence of splenomegaly.
  • Referring to the outcomes, the complete remission (CR) rate of the two groups were 92.2% and 93.9%, respectively.
  • The median overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) in p190 group were 13 months and 10 months, the 1, 3-year estimated OS were (54.7 +/- 6.7)% and (5.5 +/- 5.2)%, and the 1, 3-year estimated RFS were (40.2 +/- 6.8)% and (7.8 +/- 6.7)%, while in p210 group, the median OS and RFS were 15 months and 10 months, respectively, the 1, 3-year estimated OS were (65.8 +/- 8.9)% and (14.5 +/- 7.4)%, and the 1, 3-year estimated RFS were (48.3 +/- 9.4)% and (12.9 +/- 7.7)%.
  • All of the above data had no statistic significance between the two groups.
  • CONCLUSION: Majority of the adults with Ph+ ALL is p190 positive and patients with p210 have older age, higher BPC and more frequent occurrence of splenomegaly, while there is no significant difference between p190 group and p210 group in CR rate, RFS and OS.
  • [MeSH-major] Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / genetics. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Philadelphia Chromosome. Prognosis. Protein Isoforms / genetics. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19954044.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1426
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua nei ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / abl-bcr fusion protein, human; EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl
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8. Yan AT, Yan RT, Tan M, Senaratne M, Fitchett DH, Langer A, Goodman SG, INTERACT Investigators: Long-term prognostic value and therapeutic implications of continuous ST-segment monitoring in acute coronary syndrome. Am Heart J; 2007 Apr;153(4):500-6
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  • After a median follow-up of 30 months, patients with ST-segment shifts had a higher risk of death (17.7% vs 5.8%, log-rank P < .001) and death or myocardial infarction (MI) (24.6% vs 11.1%, log-rank P < .001).
  • In multivariable analysis adjusting for GRACE risk score, the presence of ST-segment shifts remained an independent predictor of death (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.37, 95% CI 1.38-4.09, P = .002) and death/MI (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% CI 1.25-3.00, P = .003).
  • Inhospital revascularization was independently associated with a lower risk of death/MI among patients with ST-segment shifts but not among those without (P for interaction = .02).

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  • (PMID = 17383285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6744
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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9. Steinberg DH, Pinto Slottow TL, Buch AN, Javaid A, Roy PK, Garg S, Okabe T, Torguson R, Smith KA, Xue Z, Suddath WO, Kent KM, Satler LF, Pichard AD, Lindsay J, Waksman R: Impact of in-stent restenosis on death and myocardial infarction. Am J Cardiol; 2007 Oct 1;100(7):1109-13
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  • Major adverse cardiac events, including mortality and myocardial infarction (MI), were assessed at clinical presentation, 30 days, and 6 months.
  • Patients with acute presentation (i.e., unstable angina requiring hospitalization or MI) were compared with patients with stable presentation.
  • At presentation, 19.2% of patients were asymptomatic, 27.5% had exertional angina, 46.6% had unstable angina, and 6.7% had MI.
  • Mortality and MI rates were 1.1% and 1.4%, respectively, at 30 days and 3.3% and 4.5%, respectively, at 6 months.
  • Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and those without ACS had similarly low mortality rates at 30 days (1.2% ACS vs 1.0% non-ACS, p = 0.65) and 6 months (3.4% ACS vs 3.3% non-ACS, p = 0.93) and MI rates at 30 days (1.3% ACS vs 1.4% non-ACS, p = 0.87) and 6 months (4.7% ACS vs 4.3% non-ACS, p = 0.65).

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  • (PMID = 17884372.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. Brown JK, Campbell BT, Drongowski RA, Alderman AK, Geiger JD, Teitelbaum DH, Quinn J, Coran AG, Hirschl RB: A prospective, randomized comparison of skin adhesive and subcuticular suture for closure of pediatric hernia incisions: cost and cosmetic considerations. J Pediatr Surg; 2009 Jul;44(7):1418-22
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  • [Title] A prospective, randomized comparison of skin adhesive and subcuticular suture for closure of pediatric hernia incisions: cost and cosmetic considerations.
  • PURPOSE: In this study, we compared the skin adhesive 2-octylcyanoacrylate to subcuticular suture for closure of pediatric inguinal hernia incisions to determine if skin adhesive improves wound cosmesis, shortens skin closure time, and lowers operative costs.
  • METHODS: We prospectively randomized 134 children undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy at our institution to have skin closure with either skin adhesive (n = 64) or subcuticular closure (n = 70).
  • Data collected included age, sex, weight, type of operation, total operative time, and skin closure time.
  • Digital photographs of healing incisions were taken at the 6-week postoperative visit.
  • The operating surgeon assessed cosmetic outcome of incisions using a previously validated visual analog scale, as well as an ordinate scale.
  • A blinded assessment of cosmetic outcome was then performed by an independent surgeon comparing these photographs to the visual analog scale.
  • Operating room time and resource use (ie, costs) relative to the skin closure were assessed.
  • Comparisons between groups were done using Student's t tests and chi(2) tests.
  • RESULTS: Children enrolled in the study had a mean +/- SE age of 3.7 +/- 0.3 years and weighed 16 +/- 0.8 kg.
  • Patients were predominantly male (82%).
  • Patients underwent 1 of 3 types of open hernia repair as follows: unilateral herniorrhaphy without peritoneoscopy (n = 41; 31%), unilateral herniorrhaphy with peritoneoscopy (n = 55; 41%), and bilateral herniorrhaphy (n = 38; 28%).
  • Skin closure time was significantly shorter in the skin adhesive group (adhesive = 1.4 +/- 0.8 minutes vs suture = 2.4 +/- 1.1 minutes; P = .001).
  • Mean wound cosmesis scores based on the visual analog scale were similar between groups (adhesive = 78 +/- 21; suture=78 +/- 18; P = .50).
  • Material costs related to herniorrhaphy were higher for skin adhesive (adhesive = $22.63 vs suture = $11.70; P < .001), whereas operating room time costs for adhesive skin closure were lower (adhesive = $9.33 +/- 5.33 vs suture = $16.00 +/- 7.33; P < .001).
  • Except for a 7% incidence of erythema in both groups, there were no complications encountered.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in cosmetic outcome between skin adhesive and suture closure in pediatric inguinal herniorrhaphy.
  • Material costs are increased because of the high cost of adhesive relative to suture.
  • This is partially offset, however, by the cost savings from reduction in operating room time.
  • [MeSH-major] Hernia, Inguinal / surgery. Hospital Costs. Laparoscopy / methods. Patient Satisfaction. Suture Techniques / instrumentation. Sutures / ethics. Tissue Adhesives
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing

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  • (PMID = 19573672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tissue Adhesives
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11. Xagoraraki I, Kuo DH, Wong K, Wong M, Rose JB: Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational beaches of the great lakes. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2007 Dec;73(24):7874-81
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  • [Title] Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational beaches of the great lakes.
  • Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters.
  • However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater beaches has not been previously investigated.
  • In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational beaches on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach) during the summer of 2004.
  • Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method.
  • The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver Beach samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park Beach samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples.
  • The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(1) to (3.4 +/- 0.8) x 10(2) and from (7 +/- 2) x 10(0) to (3.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) virus particles/liter for Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach, respectively.
  • F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 +/- 0.8) x 10(1) to (4.6 +/- 1.5) x 10(2) virus particles/liter.
  • Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results.
  • This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational beaches.
  • Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviridae / classification. Adenoviridae / isolation & purification. Fresh Water / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Capsid Proteins / genetics. DNA, Viral / genetics. Great Lakes Region. Humans. Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Virus Cultivation / methods

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  • (PMID = 17933924.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Capsid Proteins; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / hexon capsid protein, Adenovirus
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2168141
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12. de Waard MC, van der Velden J, Bito V, Ozdemir S, Biesmans L, Boontje NM, Dekkers DH, Schoonderwoerd K, Schuurbiers HC, de Crom R, Stienen GJ, Sipido KR, Lamers JM, Duncker DJ: Early exercise training normalizes myofilament function and attenuates left ventricular pump dysfunction in mice with a large myocardial infarction. Circ Res; 2007 Apr 13;100(7):1079-88
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  • The extent and mechanism of the cardiac benefit of early exercise training following myocardial infarction (MI) is incompletely understood, but may involve blunting of abnormalities in Ca(2+)-handling and myofilament function.
  • Consequently, we investigated the effects of 8-weeks of voluntary exercise, started early after a large MI, on left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction in the mouse.
  • Exercise had no effect on survival, MI size or LV dimensions, but improved LV fractional shortening from 8+/-1 to 12+/-1%, and LVdP/dt(P30) from 5295+/-207 to 5794+/-207 mm Hg/s (both P<0.05), and reduced pulmonary congestion.
  • These global effects of exercise were associated with normalization of the MI-induced increase in myofilament Ca(2+)-sensitivity (DeltapCa(50)=0.037).
  • Exercise prevented the MI-induced decreased maximum force generating capacity of skinned cardiomyocytes (F(max) increased from 14.3+/-0.7 to 18.3+/-0.8 kN/m(2) P<0.05), which was associated with enhanced shortening of unloaded intact cardiomyocytes (from 4.1+/-0.3 to 7.0+/-0.6%; P<0.05).
  • In conclusion, early exercise in mice after a large MI has no effect on LV remodeling, but attenuates global LV dysfunction.

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  • [CommentIn] Circ Res. 2007 Apr 13;100(7):937-9 [17431194.001]
  • (PMID = 17347478.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4571
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proteins; E0399OZS9N / Cyclic AMP
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13. Morden P, Drongowski RA, Geiger JD, Hirschl RB, Teitelbaum DH: Comparison of Karydakis versus midline excision for treatment of pilonidal sinus disease. Pediatr Surg Int; 2005 Oct;21(10):793-6
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  • [Title] Comparison of Karydakis versus midline excision for treatment of pilonidal sinus disease.
  • Pilonidal sinus disease is associated with a high rate of recurrence and complications.
  • The Karydakis (KAR) method, whereby an asymmetric subcutaneous flap obliterates the anal crease, has been shown to be effective in adults.
  • The goal of this study is to assess the efficacy of the KAR procedure in the operative treatment of children with pilonidal sinus disease compared to those treated via a midline excision (ME).
  • Sixty-eight cases of pediatric pilonidal sinus excision were reviewed over the past 10 years.
  • Data abstracted included surgical approach, complication rate and recurrence rate.
  • Student's t-test or the Chi square test was used for statistical analysis, with P < 0.05 being considered significant.
  • An ME was performed in 44 patients; the KAR method was used in 24 patients.
  • Mean age at diagnosis was 14.4 +/- 4.2 years for the ME group compared to 15.7 +/- 4.3 years for the KAR patients (P = 0.18).
  • Mean operative time was significantly longer with the KAR method (58.7 +/- 25.6 min) compared to 46.3 +/- 18.6 for the primary ME (P = 0.04).
  • Despite the increased operative dissection, there was no difference (P = 0.42) in early post-operative complication rates between groups (25% in the KAR group compared to 34.8% in the ME group).
  • Initial drainage of an abscess had no significant effect upon the recurrence/complication rate in either group.
  • Recurrence rate alone was lower in patients operated on via the KAR approach 0% versus 11.0% using the ME (P = 0.153).
  • Recurrence and complication rates were lower for those patients with a pilonidal sinus treated by the KAR method compared to the ME, but the results did not reach significance.
  • In conclusion, this study does show a potential benefit for children treated with the KAR method for pilonidal sinus.
  • This study mimics the data obtained in adult patients and suggests that a larger study is likely to achieve significance.
  • [MeSH-major] Pilonidal Sinus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Postoperative Complications. Recurrence. Reoperation. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 16172873.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric surgery international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Surg. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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14. Mukherjee R, Mingoia JT, Bruce JA, Austin JS, Stroud RE, Escobar GP, McClister DM Jr, Allen CM, Alfonso-Jaume MA, Fini ME, Lovett DH, Spinale FG: Selective spatiotemporal induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 transcription after myocardial infarction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol; 2006 Nov;291(5):H2216-28
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  • Myocardial remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with increased levels of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).
  • Levels of two MMP species, MMP-2 and MMP-9, are increased after MI, and transgenic deletion of these MMPs attenuates post-MI left ventricular (LV) remodeling.
  • This study characterized the spatiotemporal patterns of gene promoter induction for MMP-2 and MMP-9 after MI.
  • MI was induced in transgenic mice in which the MMP-2 or MMP-9 promoter sequence was fused to the beta-galactosidase reporter, and reporter level was assayed up to 28 days after MI.
  • After MI, LV diameter increased by 70% (P < 0.05), consistent with LV remodeling. beta-Galactosidase staining in MMP-2 reporter mice was increased by 1 day after MI and increased further to 64 +/- 6% of LV epicardial area by 7 days after MI (P < 0.05).
  • MMP-2 promoter activation occurred in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the MI region.
  • In MMP-9 reporter mice, promoter induction was detected after 3 days and peaked at 7 days after MI (53 +/- 6%, P < 0.05) and was colocalized with inflammatory cells at the peri-infarct region.
  • Although MMP-2 promoter activation was similarly distributed in the MI and border regions, activation of the MMP-9 promoter was highest at the border between the MI and remote regions.
  • These unique findings visually demonstrated that activation of the MMP-2 and MMP-9 gene promoters occurs in a distinct spatial relation with reference to the MI region and changes in a characteristic time-dependent manner after MI.

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  • (PMID = 16766634.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-29776; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY-12651; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY-14801; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-45024; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-66029; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-97012; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01-HL-48788; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01-HL-68738
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.2.1.23 / beta-Galactosidase; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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15. Spencer AU, Sun X, El-Sawaf M, Haxhija EQ, Brei D, Luntz J, Yang H, Teitelbaum DH: Enterogenesis in a clinically feasible model of mechanical small-bowel lengthening. Surgery; 2006 Aug;140(2):212-20
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  • [Title] Enterogenesis in a clinically feasible model of mechanical small-bowel lengthening.
  • BACKGROUND: Recent work indicates that mechanical force induces small-bowel growth, although methods reported do not have direct clinical application.
  • We report a clinically feasible technique of enterogenesis and describe intestinal function in this model.
  • METHODS: Using a pig model (n = 11), we stretched isolated small intestinal segments mechanically for 7 days in vivo with an intraluminal device.
  • Control segments were not stretched.
  • Morphology, histology, and epithelial proliferation were assessed.
  • Absorption and epithelial barrier function were examined in an Ussing chamber.
  • RESULTS: Stretch segments were significantly longer than Control segments and had nearly 2-fold greater surface area (P < .001).
  • Mucosal thickness was much greater in Stretch than Control segments (772 +/- 134 vs. 647 +/- 75 microm, P = .02).
  • Although villus height was reduced in Stretch and Control segments (353 +/- 76 vs. 324 +/- 76 microm, P = .6) versus native jejunum (522 +/- 87, P < .0005), crypt depth was increased dramatically in Stretch (450 +/- 95 microm) versus Control segments (341 +/- 64, P = .005).
  • This observation was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in cellular proliferation (26.3 +/- 3.8 vs 12.1 +/- 6.6 % bromodeoxyuridine+, P < .05).
  • Barrier function was intact ([3H]-mannitol permeation, 0.16 +/- 0.08%, vs native jejunum, 0.17 +/- 0.08%, P = .81).
  • Glucose-mediated sodium transport was similar in Stretch versus native jejunum segments (60.0 +/- 23.5 vs 82.3 +/- 47.3 microA/cm2, P = .31), as was carbachol-induced chloride transport (82.4 +/- 72.2 vs 57.2 +/- 33.4 microA/cm2, P = .54) and alanine absorption (16.46 +/- 12.94 vs 23.53 +/- 21.31 microA/cm2, P = .53).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mechanical stretching induces small intestinal growth, while maintaining function.
  • Epithelial architecture does change, such that a decrease in villus height is offset by a marked increase in crypt depth and a 2-fold increase in epithelial proliferation.
  • Epithelial barrier and absorptive functions remain intact.
  • The device described may have direct clinical applicability.
  • [MeSH-major] Jejunum / growth & development. Stress, Mechanical. Tissue Expansion Devices
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Equipment Design. Feasibility Studies. Female. Intestinal Absorption / physiology. Models, Animal. Swine. Tensile Strength

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  • (PMID = 16904972.001).
  • [ISSN] 0039-6060
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS15554; NLM/ PMC1764912
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16. Roberts FO, Gunawardana DH, Pathmaraj K, Wallace A, U PL, Mi T, Berlangieri SU, O'Keefe GJ, Rowe CC, Scott AM: Radiation dose to PET technologists and strategies to lower occupational exposure. J Nucl Med Technol; 2005 Mar;33(1):44-7
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  • [Title] Radiation dose to PET technologists and strategies to lower occupational exposure.
  • OBJECTIVE: The use of PET in Australia has grown rapidly.
  • We conducted a prospective study of the radiation exposure of technologists working in PET and evaluated the occupational radiation dose after implementation of strategies to lower exposure.
  • METHODS: Radiation doses measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 2-y period were reviewed both for technologists working in PET and for technologists working in general nuclear medicine in a busy academic nuclear medicine department.
  • The separate components of the procedures for dose administration and patient monitoring were assessed to identify the areas contributing the most to the dose received.
  • The impact on dose of implementing portable 511-keV syringe shields (primary shields) and larger trolley-mounted shields (secondary shields) was also compared with initial results using no shield.
  • RESULTS: We found that the radiation exposure of PET technologists was higher than that of technologists performing general nuclear medicine studies, with doses averaging 771 +/- 147 and 524 +/- 123 microSv per quarter, respectively (P = 0.01).
  • The estimated dose per PET procedure was 4.1 microSv (11 nSv/MBq).
  • Injection of 18F-FDG contributed the most to radiation exposure.
  • The 511-keV syringe shield reduced the average dose per injection from 2.5 to 1.4 microSv (P < 0.001).
  • For the longer period of dose transportation and injection, the additional use of the secondary shield resulted in a significantly lower dose of radiation than did use of the primary shield alone or no shield (1.9 vs. 3.6 microSv [P = 0.01] and 3.4 microSv [P = 0.03], respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: The radiation doses currently received by technologists working in PET are within accepted occupational health guidelines, but improved shielding can further reduce the dose.
  • [MeSH-major] Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital / statistics & numerical data. Occupational Exposure / prevention & control. Occupational Exposure / statistics & numerical data. Positron-Emission Tomography / statistics & numerical data. Radiation Monitoring / methods. Radiation Protection / methods. Risk Assessment / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Australia / epidemiology. Humans. Radiation Dosage. Radiation Injuries / prevention & control. Risk Factors. Thermoluminescent Dosimetry / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 15731021.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-4916
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine technology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nucl Med Technol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. Grüschow S, Chang LC, Mao Y, Sherman DH: Hydroxyquinone O-methylation in mitomycin biosynthesis. J Am Chem Soc; 2007 May 23;129(20):6470-6
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  • [Title] Hydroxyquinone O-methylation in mitomycin biosynthesis.
  • Mitomycins are bioreductively activated DNA-alkylating agents.
  • One member of this family, mitomycin C, is in clinical use as part of combination therapy for certain solid tumors.
  • The cytotoxicity displayed by mitomycins is dependent on their electrochemical potential which, in turn, is governed in part by the substituents of the quinone moiety.
  • In this paper we describe studies on the biogenesis of the quinone methoxy group present in mitomycins A and B.
  • An engineered Streptomyces lavendulae strain in which the mmcR methyltransferase gene had been deleted failed to produce the three mitomycins (A, B, and C) that are typically isolated from the wild type organism.
  • Analysis of the culture extracts from the mmcR-deletion mutant strain revealed that two new metabolites, 7-demethylmitomycin A and 7-demethylmitomycin B, had accumulated instead.
  • Production of mitomycins A and C or mitomycin B was selectively restored upon supplementing the culture medium of a S. lavendulae strain unable to produce the key precursor 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoate with either 7-demethylmitomycin A or 7-demethylmitomycin B, respectively.
  • MmcR methyltransferase obtained by cloning and overexpression of the corresponding mmcR gene was shown to catalyze the 7-O-methylation of both C9beta- and C9alpha-configured 7-hydroxymitomycins in vitro.
  • This study provides direct evidence for the catalytic role of MmcR in formation of the 7-OMe group that is characteristic of mitomycins A and B and demonstrates the prerequisite of 7-O-methylation for the production of the clinical agent mitomycin C.
  • [MeSH-major] Mitomycins / biosynthesis. Mitomycins / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Catalysis. Methylation. Methyltransferases / genetics. Methyltransferases / metabolism. Molecular Structure. Mutation / genetics. Streptomyces / genetics. Streptomyces / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17461583.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-7863
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Chemical Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Chem. Soc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 81172
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mitomycins; 4055-39-4 / mitomycin A; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases
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18. Wang GR, Zhao YZ, Qian LS, Zou DH, Li R, Mi YC, Wang XX, Qiu LG: [Analysis of long-term treatment outcome and related factors in 95 chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib]. Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi; 2008 Jan;29(1):18-22
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  • [Title] [Analysis of long-term treatment outcome and related factors in 95 chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and analyse the treatment outcome and related factors.
  • METHODS: Ninety five CML patients were treated with imatinib in our hospital from May 2002 to May 2006.
  • The outcomes and related factors were analysed. RESULTS:.
  • (1) One year after therapy, there were 95.5% of chronic phase (CP) patients achieved complete hematologic response (CHR).
  • Fifty-two patients with complete cytogenetic dates were divided into primary-therapy group (n = 19) and secondary-therapy group (n = 33).
  • The major cytogenetic responses (MCyR) at 6-, 12-, 18-, 24- and 30-months after therapy for the former group were 84.2%, 84.2%, 89.5%, 89.5% and 94.7%, and for the latter group were 36.4%, 39.4%, 39.4%, 39.4% and 39.4%, respectively (P < 0.01).
  • The expected survival at 12-, 24-, 36- and 50-month after imatinib treatment for CP group was (98.1 +/-1.9)%, (87.8 +/- 7.1)%, (81.9 +/- 8.7)% and (81.9 +/- 8.7)%, respectively. (2) Twelve month after therapy, there are 70% of accelerated phase (AP) patients achieve CHR and 10% get MCyR.
  • The expected survival at 12-, 24- and 36-month after imatinib treatment for AP group was (63.0 +/- 17.7)%, (15.8 +/- 14.3)% and (15.8 +/- 14.3)%, respectively. (3) Six month after therapy, 57.9% of blast crisis (BC) patients achieve CHR, with the expected survival at 12- and 24-month of (40.6 +/- 12.3)% and 0, respectively. (4) COX analysis CP group indicated that imatinib therapy administered for previously untreated was an independent favorable prognostic factor.
  • Conclusion (1) Imatinib as a primary treatment for CP CML can significantly improve the survival time as compared with that AP or BC patients or with that used in previously treated patients. (2) Imatinib could induce hematologic, even cytogenetic response to a certain extent, in CP or BC patients and prolong the survival time.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Benzamides. Female. Humans. Imatinib Mesylate. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


19. Stein GE, Schooley SL, Peloquin CA, Kak V, Havlichek DH, Citron DM, Tyrrell KL, Goldstein EJ: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid in obese patients with cellulitis. Ann Pharmacother; 2005 Mar;39(3):427-32
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  • [Title] Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid in obese patients with cellulitis.
  • BACKGROUND: Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antimicrobial with excellent oral bioavailability and tissue penetration and is active against multidrug-resistant skin/soft tissue pathogens.
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the pharmacokinetics and antibacterial activity of linezolid against selective skin/soft tissue pathogens in obese patients.
  • METHODS: We obtained multiple serum samples from 7 obese patients (>50% over their calculated ideal body weight) receiving oral linezolid 600 mg every 12 hours for treatment of cellulitis.
  • Following a minimum of 3 doses, serum concentrations of linezolid were measured in each subject prior to (trough) and 1 and 6 hours after a dose.
  • These samples were then tested against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (linezolid minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 microg/mL) and one strain each of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) (MIC 2.0 microg/mL), Bacteroides fragilis (MIC 2.0 microg/mL), and Peptostreptococcus magnus (MIC 1.0 microg/mL).
  • Serum inhibitory titers (SITs) and bactericidal titers (SBTs) were measured at each time point, and the median activity for these 7 patients was calculated.
  • RESULTS: Mean linezolid serum concentrations were 4.2, 12.3, and 7.2 microg/mL at these respective time points.
  • Median SITs for 12 hours (100% of the dosing interval) were observed against each organism with the exception of the least susceptible strain of MRSA (MIC 4.0 microg/mL); serum inhibitory activity was observed only at the one-hour time point against this isolate.
  • Furthermore, prolonged (> or =6 h) median SBTs were observed against one isolate of MRSA (MIC 1.0 microg/mL) as well as the strain of VRE and P. magnus.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Serum concentrations of oral linezolid in this patient population were diminished compared with those of healthy volunteers, but still provided prolonged serum inhibitory activity against common pathogens associated with skin/soft tissue infections.
  • One treatment concern would be an obese patient receiving oral linezolid who was infected with a less susceptible (MIC > or =4.0 microg/mL) strain of S. aureus.
  • Bactericidal activity was also observed against selective pathogens.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetamides / pharmacology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Cellulitis / drug therapy. Obesity / complications. Oxazolidinones / pharmacology. Skin Diseases, Bacterial / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Area Under Curve. Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial. Female. Half-Life. Humans. Linezolid. Male. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Middle Aged. Serum Bactericidal Test

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  • (PMID = 15701775.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acetamides; 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Oxazolidinones; ISQ9I6J12J / Linezolid
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20. Min SH, Kim MH, Seo JB, Lee JY, Lee DH: The quantitative analysis of back muscle degeneration after posterior lumbar fusion: comparison of minimally invasive and conventional open surgery. Asian Spine J; 2009 Dec;3(2):89-95
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  • PURPOSE: The results of conventional open surgery was compared with those from minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for lumbar fusion to determine which approach resulted in less postoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration.
  • OVERVIEW OF LITERATURE: MI TLIF is new surgical technique that appears to minimize iatrogenic injury.
  • There were 17 cases of conventional open surgery and 31 cases of MI-TLIF (31 cases of single segment fusion and 17 cases of multi-segment fusion).
  • RESULTS: A comparison of the traditional posterior fusion method with MI-TLIF revealed single segment fusion to result in an average increase in fat infiltration in the paraspinal muscle of 4.30% and 1.37% and a decrease in cross-sectional area of 0.10 and 0.07 before and after surgery, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A comparison of conventional open surgery with MI-TLIF upon degeneration of the paraspinal muscle with a 1 year follow-up evaluation revealed that both single and multi segment fusion showed less change in fat infiltration percentage and cross-sectional area in the MI-TLIF but there was no significant difference between the two groups.

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  • (PMID = 20404953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1976-7846
  • [Journal-full-title] Asian spine journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Asian Spine J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2852079
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Fat degeneration / MRI / Paraspainal muscle / Posterior fusion
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21. Lemesle G, Bonello L, De Labriolle A, Steinberg DH, Roy P, Slottow TL, Torguson R, Kaneshige K, Xue Z, Suddath WO, Satler LF, Kent KM, Lindsay J, Pichard AD, Waksman R: Impact of bivalirudin use on outcomes in nonagenarians undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. J Interv Cardiol; 2009 Feb;22(1):61-7
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  • In-hospital and 6-month rates of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target lesion revascularization were indexed.
  • The clinical presentation was an acute MI in 59% of the cases.
  • Clinical presentations as MI or cardiogenic shock were associated with high rates of in-hospital death: 19.3% and 30%, respectively.
  • Predictors of 6-month outcomes were clinical presentations as MI or cardiogenic shock, renal failure, and total stent length.

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  • (PMID = 19281522.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-8183
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of interventional cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Interv Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 0 / Hirudins; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 128270-60-0 / bivalirudin; 9005-49-6 / Heparin
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22. Kostianev SS, Hodgev VA, Iluchev DH: Multidimensional system for assessment of COPD patients. Comparison with BODE index. Folia Med (Plovdiv); 2008 Oct-Dec;50(4):29-38
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  • The letters of the abbreviation stand for the following: D--dyspnea, O--obstruction, RE--rate of exacerbation, MI--movement (exercise) intolerance, B--Body Mass Index, OX--blood oxygen disturbances.

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  • (PMID = 19209528.001).
  • [ISSN] 0204-8043
  • [Journal-full-title] Folia medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Folia Med (Plovdiv)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bulgaria
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23. Tsai S, Strouse PJ, Drongowski RA, Islam S, Teitelbaum DH: Failure of cholecystokinin-octapeptide to prevent TPN-associated gallstone disease. J Pediatr Surg; 2005 Jan;40(1):263-7
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  • [Title] Failure of cholecystokinin-octapeptide to prevent TPN-associated gallstone disease.
  • PURPOSE: Gallstone formation is a common problem in neonates on prolonged courses of total parenteral nutrition (TPN).
  • The authors hypothesized that the use of cholecystokinin-octapeptide (CCK), given at the time of TPN administration, would prevent gallstone formation in a high-risk group of patients with TPN.
  • METHODS: A prospective, randomized, blinded, controlled trial of neonates who were on a prolonged course of TPN for prematurity (25 infants), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC, 8 infants), or abdominal surgery (5 infants) were selected randomly to receive CCK vs placebo.
  • Patients remained on the study until taking more than 50% of energy enterally.
  • Children were recalled between 2 and 4 years after completing TPN for ultrasonographic examination of their hepatobiliary tree.
  • RESULTS: Neonates (38 studied) required a mean (+/-SD) of 33 +/- 16 days of TPN.
  • Cholelithiasis was detected in 4 (10%) infants.
  • Cholecystokinin-octapeptide was not effective in preventing the formation of gallstones (3 stones in infants receiving CCK, P = .51).
  • Diagnosis (P = .56), birth weight (P = .54), gestational age (P = .18), and duration of TPN (P = .53) did not correlate with gallstone formation.
  • To address the management of these stones, all 4 were placed on a prolonged course of ursodeoxycholic acid (mean duration, 11.6 +/- 5.4 months).
  • Two additional infants (not in the original study) with TPN-associated gallstone disease were also given a trial of ursodeoxycholic acid.
  • Serial ultrasounds were performed every 6 months.
  • No patient achieved any degree of stone dissolution.
  • One patient underwent cholecystectomy for symptomatology.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Total parenteral nutrition-associated gallstones were detected in 10% of children, and most are nonsymptomatic.
  • Cholecystokinin-octapeptide prophylaxis was not effective in preventing TPN-associated gallstones.
  • In addition, the use of ursodeoxycholic acid did not dissolve gallstones, once identified.
  • Future methods will be needed to address the prevention and treatment of these stones.
  • [MeSH-major] Cholagogues and Choleretics / therapeutic use. Gallstones / prevention & control. Parenteral Nutrition, Total / adverse effects. Sincalide / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Double-Blind Method. Gastrointestinal Agents / therapeutic use. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Prospective Studies. Treatment Failure. Ursodeoxycholic Acid / therapeutic use

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  • (PMID = 15868595.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cholagogues and Choleretics; 0 / Gastrointestinal Agents; 724L30Y2QR / Ursodeoxycholic Acid; M03GIQ7Z6P / Sincalide
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24. Lee SP, Kim SY, Park KW, Shin DH, Kang HJ, Koo BK, Suh JW, Cho YS, Yeon TJ, Chae IH, Choi DJ, Kim HS: Long-term clinical outcome of chronic total occlusive lesions treated with drug-eluting stents: comparison of sirolimus-eluting and paclitaxel-eluting stents. Circ J; 2010 Apr;74(4):693-700
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  • During mean follow-up of 2 years, the SES group had a significantly lower cumulative target vessel failure (TVF) rate than the PES group (14.9% vs 28.4%, P=0.01), as a consequence of lower target vessel revascularization (9.7% vs 23.9%, P=0.01) and also a partially lower rate of myocardial infarction (MI: 3.1% vs 7.6%, P=0.04).
  • Predictors for TVF were use of PES (hazard ratio (HR) 3.81, P<0.01), previous history of MI (HR 4.06, P<0.01), diabetes (HR 2.07, P=0.04) and chronic kidney disease (CKD; HR 3.56, P=0.05).

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  • (PMID = 20197629.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-4820
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation journal : official journal of the Japanese Circulation Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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25. Kuo DH, Simmons FJ, Blair S, Hart E, Rose JB, Xagoraraki I: Assessment of human adenovirus removal in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater. Water Res; 2010 Mar;44(5):1520-30
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  • [Title] Assessment of human adenovirus removal in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.
  • Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) in wastewater samples taken from four different treatment stages of a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant (i.e., incoming raw sewage, primary sedimentation effluent, membrane bioreactor (MBR) influent, and MBR effluent) were quantified by real-time PCR assays to further estimate removal efficiency of the HAdvs. Based on hexon gene sequence comparisons, HAdV species A, C, and F were consistently found in the wastewater samples.
  • In general, all three identified HAdV species were detected in most of the wastewater samples using the real-time PCR assays.
  • Overall HAdV concentrations were rather stable over the entire 8-month study period (January-August, 2008) (approximately 10(6)-10(7)viral particles/L of wastewater for the raw sewage and primary effluent; 10(8)-10(9)viral particles/L for the MBR influent; and, 10(3)-10(4)viral particles/L for the MBR effluent).
  • No significant seasonal differences were noticed for the HAdV abundances.
  • Removal efficiencies of the viral particles in the full-scale MBR process were assessed and showed an average HAdV removal of 5.0+/-0.6logs over the study period.
  • The removal efficiencies for F species (average log removal of 6.5+/-1.3logs) were typically higher (p-value <0.05) than those of the other two species (average of 4.1+/-0.9 and 4.6+/-0.5logs for species A and C, respectively).
  • These results demonstrate that the full-scale MBR system efficiently removed most HAdV from the wastewater leaving about 10(3)viral particles/L in the MBR effluent.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviruses, Human / isolation & purification. Bioreactors / virology. Cities. Membranes, Artificial. Waste Disposal, Fluid / instrumentation. Water Purification / instrumentation
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Phylogeny. Sewage / virology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • (PMID = 19944439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-2448
  • [Journal-full-title] Water research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Water Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Membranes, Artificial; 0 / Sewage
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26. Hamer DH, Singh MP, Wylie BJ, Yeboah-Antwi K, Tuchman J, Desai M, Udhayakumar V, Gupta P, Brooks MI, Shukla MM, Awasthy K, Sabin L, MacLeod WB, Dash AP, Singh N: Burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand State, India. Malar J; 2009;8:210
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  • [Title] Burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand State, India.
  • BACKGROUND: Past studies in India included only symptomatic pregnant women and thus may have overestimated the proportion of women with malaria.
  • Given the large population at risk, a cross sectional study was conducted in order to better define the burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand, a malaria-endemic state in central-east India.
  • METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys at antenatal clinics and delivery units were performed over a 12-month period at two district hospitals in urban and semi-urban areas, and a rural mission hospital.
  • Malaria was diagnosed by Giemsa-stained blood smear and/or rapid diagnostic test using peripheral or placental blood.
  • RESULTS: 2,386 pregnant women were enrolled at the antenatal clinics and 718 at the delivery units.
  • 1.8% (43/2382) of the antenatal clinic cohort had a positive diagnostic test for malaria (53.5% Plasmodium falciparum, 37.2% Plasmodium vivax, and 9.3% mixed infections).
  • Peripheral parasitaemia was more common in pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in rural sites (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 4.31, 95%CI 1.84-10.11) and in those who were younger than 20 years (aRR 2.68, 95%CI 1.03-6.98).
  • Among delivery unit participants, 1.7% (12/717) had peripheral parasitaemia and 2.4% (17/712) had placental parasitaemia.
  • Women attending delivery units were more likely to be parasitaemic if they were in their first or second pregnancy (aRR 3.17, 95%CI 1.32-7.61), had fever in the last week (aRR 5.34, 95%CI 2.89-9.90), or had rural residence (aRR 3.10, 95%CI 1.66-5.79).
  • Malaria control measures including indoor residual spraying (IRS) and untreated bed nets were common, whereas insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) and malaria chemoprophylaxis were rarely used.
  • CONCLUSION: The prevalence of malaria among pregnant women was relatively low.
  • However, given the large at-risk population in this malaria-endemic region of India, there is a need to enhance ITN availability and use for prevention of malaria in pregnancy, and to improve case management of symptomatic pregnant women.
  • [MeSH-major] Malaria, Falciparum / epidemiology. Malaria, Vivax / epidemiology. Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Animals. Blood / parasitology. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. India / epidemiology. Plasmodium falciparum / isolation & purification. Plasmodium vivax / isolation & purification. Pregnancy. Prevalence. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19728882.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2875
  • [Journal-full-title] Malaria journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Malar. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2744702
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27. Wylie BJ, Hashmi AH, Singh N, Singh MP, Tuchman J, Hussain M, Sabin L, Yeboah-Antwi K, Banerjee C, Brooks MI, Desai M, Udhayakumar V, Macleod WB, Dash AP, Hamer DH: Availability and utilization of malaria prevention strategies in pregnancy in eastern India. BMC Public Health; 2010;10:557
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  • [Title] Availability and utilization of malaria prevention strategies in pregnancy in eastern India.
  • BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy in India, as elsewhere, is responsible for maternal anemia and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight and preterm birth.It is not known whether prevention and treatment strategies for malaria in pregnancy (case management, insecticide-treated bednets, intermittent preventive therapy) are widely utilized in India.
  • METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted during 2006-2008 in two states of India, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh, at 7 facilities representing a range of rural and urban populations and areas of more versus less stable malaria transmission.
  • 280 antenatal visits (40/site) were observed by study personnel coupled with exit interviews of pregnant women to assess emphasis upon, availability and utilization of malaria prevention practices by health workers and pregnant women.
  • The facilities were assessed for the availability of antimalarials, lab supplies and bednets.
  • RESULTS: All participating facilities were equipped to perform malaria blood smears; none used rapid diagnostic tests.
  • Chloroquine, endorsed for chemoprophylaxis during pregnancy by the government at the time of the study, was stocked regularly at all facilities although the quantity stocked varied.
  • Availability of alternative antimalarials for use in pregnancy was less consistent.
  • In Jharkhand, no health worker recommended bednet use during the antenatal visit yet over 90% of pregnant women had bednets in their household.
  • In Chhattisgarh, bednets were available at all facilities but only 14.4% of health workers recommended their use.
  • 40% of the pregnant women interviewed had bednets in their household.
  • Only 1.4% of all households owned an insecticide-treated bednet; yet 40% of all women reported their households had been sprayed with insecticide.
  • Antimalarial chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine was prescribed in only 2 (0.7%) and intermittent preventive therapy prescribed in only one (0.4%) of the 280 observed visits.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A disconnect remains between routine antenatal practices in India and known strategies to prevent and treat malaria in pregnancy.
  • Prevention strategies, in particular the use of insecticide-treated bednets, are underutilized.
  • Gaps highlighted by this study combined with recent estimates of the prevalence of malaria during pregnancy in these areas should be used to revise governmental policy and target increased educational efforts among health care workers and pregnant women.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Services Accessibility. Malaria / prevention & control. Preventive Health Services / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Case Management. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. India. Pregnancy. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 20849590.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2458
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R03 HD052167; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R03 HD52167-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2949771
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28. Kang SJ, Lee EY, Song JK, Do KH, Seo JB, Lim TH, Song JM, Kang DH, Kim YH, Lee CW, Hong MK, Park SW, Park SJ: Assessment of papillary muscle function in patients with inferior wall myocardial infarction using Doppler tissue imaging. J Am Soc Echocardiogr; 2005 Aug;18(8):815-20
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  • OBJECTIVES: We sought to assess the relationship between infarct status and systolic contractile function of papillary muscle (PM) for patients with inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI).
  • METHODS: Peak systolic velocity (V) of posteromedial PM, systolic strain (epsilon) of posteromedial PM (epsilonPM), V of adjacent inferior wall, and of adjacent inferior wall (epsilonW) were calculated from color Doppler tissue imaging images obtained at apical views in 25 patients with inferior MI and in 13 healthy control subjects.
  • All 25 patients with MI underwent magnetic resonance imaging to assess the infarct status of PM.
  • RESULTS: Compared with the control subjects, patients with MI had significantly lower V of adjacent inferior wall (5.0 +/- 0.8 vs 4.4 +/- 1.1 cm/s, P = .049) and V of posteromedial PM (4.9 +/- 0.8 vs 4.0 +/- 1.2 cm/s, P = .005), and less systolic deformation, as demonstrated by epsilonW (-17 +/- 3 vs -6 +/- 5%, P < .001) and epsilonPM (-24 +/- 5 vs -11 +/- 6%, P < .001).
  • There was a weak positive correlation between epsilonW and epsilonPM (r = 0.393, P = .052) for patients with MI.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with inferior wall MI, infarct status of the PM is variable and determines its systolic contractile function, which can be quantified by epsilon measurement using Doppler tissue imaging.

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  • (PMID = 16084333.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6795
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography : official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Soc Echocardiogr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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29. Garabrant DH, Aylward LL, Berent S, Chen Q, Timchalk C, Burns CJ, Hays SM, Albers JW: Cholinesterase inhibition in chlorpyrifos workers: Characterization of biomarkers of exposure and response in relation to urinary TCPy. J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol; 2009 Nov;19(7):634-42
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  • [Title] Cholinesterase inhibition in chlorpyrifos workers: Characterization of biomarkers of exposure and response in relation to urinary TCPy.
  • The objective of this study was to evaluate the quantitative relation between measured red blood cell acetylcholinesterase (RBC AChE) and plasma butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) activities with exposure to chlorpyrifos (CPF) as assessed by measurement of urinary 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in a study group of workers occupationally exposed in the manufacture of CPF and a referent group of chemical manufacturing workers.
  • Measures of plasma BuChE and RBC AChE activity and urinary TCPy concentration collected over a year-long study (1999-2000) in CPF-exposed workers (n=53) and referents (n=60) were analyzed using linear mixed models to characterize exposure-response relationships.
  • Intraindividual variability in cholinesterase measures was compared between CPF-exposed workers and referents.
  • Urinary TCPy concentrations in CPF workers were substantially elevated compared to referents, with median and 95th percentile concentrations during typical employment conditions 10-fold and more than 30-fold higher, respectively, than corresponding measures in the referents.
  • Intraindividual variability in cholinesterase activities was substantial, with 17% of unexposed referents experiencing one or more plasma BuChE measures more than 20% below baseline over a year of repeated, periodic measurements.
  • RBC AChE activity, an early biomarker of effect, was unrelated to urinary TCPy concentration over the entire range of exposure, up to 1000 microg TCPy/g creatinine (Cr).
  • Plasma BuChE activity, a non-adverse biomarker of exposure, was negatively related to urinary TCPy concentrations above approximately 110 microg TCPy/g Cr.
  • No-effect levels for inhibition of plasma BuChE and RBC AChE corresponding to absorbed doses of CPF of approximately 5 and greater than 50 microg/kg/day, respectively, were identified.
  • These findings are consistent with previous no-effect level determinations for ChE inhibition in humans and suggest that general population CPF exposure levels are substantially below the identified no-effect levels.
  • The dose-response relationships observed in this study are consistent with predictions from the previously published physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CPF.
  • Intraindividual variability in measured cholinesterase activities in referents was substantial, suggesting that ongoing monitoring programs may have a substantial rate of false positives.
  • [MeSH-major] Chemical Industry. Chlorpyrifos / pharmacokinetics. Cholinesterase Inhibitors. Cholinesterases / blood. Insecticides / pharmacokinetics. Occupational Exposure / analysis. Pyridones / urine
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Biomarkers / urine. Butyrylcholinesterase / blood. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Assessment. Workplace

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  • (PMID = 18716607.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-064X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of exposure science & environmental epidemiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / R01 OH003629; United States / NIOSH CDC HHS / OH / R01 OH008173
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Cholinesterase Inhibitors; 0 / Insecticides; 0 / Pyridones; 6515-38-4 / 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol; EC 3.1.1.- / Butyrylcholinesterase; EC 3.1.1.8 / Cholinesterases; JCS58I644W / Chlorpyrifos
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30. Lobo JD, Kim AC, Davis RP, Segura BJ, Alpert H, Teitelbaum DH, Geiger JD, Mychaliska GB: No free ride? The hidden costs of delayed operative management using a spring-loaded silo for gastroschisis. J Pediatr Surg; 2010 Jul;45(7):1426-32
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  • [Title] No free ride? The hidden costs of delayed operative management using a spring-loaded silo for gastroschisis.
  • PURPOSE: The ideal management of gastroschisis (primary vs staged closure) has not yet been established.
  • Despite the ease of silo placement, anecdotal experience shows that silos do not always offer benefit.
  • The aim of this study was to highlight concerns regarding use of spring loaded silos and compare outcomes to primary closure.
  • METHODS: Thirty-seven neonates with gastroschisis treated with either primary (n = 10) or staged closure with a spring-loaded silo (n = 27) were reviewed (1998-2007).
  • Variables included ventilator days, daily intravenous fluid, hospital days, and complication rates.
  • SPSS (SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill) was used to perform t test and chi(2) analyses (significance P < .05).
  • RESULTS: Survival for primary closure was 100% (10/10) compared to 89% (24/27) for staged closure (P = .548).
  • Patients managed with silos required prolonged ventilation (16.1 +/- 4 days vs 3.6 +/- 1 days; P < or = .05) and greater intravenous fluids on days 3, 4, and 5 of life (132 +/- 25 mL/kg per day vs 104 +/- 18 mL/kg per day; P < or = .01).
  • Although there was no difference in the complication rates between the groups, several problems were evident in the silo group: 15% (4/27) required silo replacement, 44% (12/27) required fascial defect enlargement for silo placement, and 19% (5/27) required mesh at closure.
  • No significant differences in recovery of intestinal function were observed.
  • Three silo patients developed ischemic complications because of vascular insufficiency at the level of the abdominal wall, leading to significant intestinal loss, ventilator and total parenteral nutrition dependence, and increased hospital stay.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients managed with a silo had longer ventilator requirements and greater fluid needs.
  • This Specific technical complications leading to bowel ischemia were notable in the silo group.
  • The silo should be carefully placed to avoid bowel twisting and the funnel effect.
  • Larger prospective studies should be performed to provide decision-making criteria for the use of a silo vs primary closure.
  • [MeSH-major] Digestive System Surgical Procedures / methods. Gastroschisis / surgery. Prostheses and Implants / adverse effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Female. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Intestinal Obstruction / etiology. Intestinal Obstruction / prevention & control. Intestines / blood supply. Male. Prosthesis Design. Retrospective Studies. Sepsis / etiology. Sepsis / prevention & control. Short Bowel Syndrome / etiology. Short Bowel Syndrome / prevention & control. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20638519.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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31. Cote ML, Schenk M, Schwartz AG, Vigneau FD, Kinnard M, Greenson JK, Fryzek JP, Ying GS, Garabrant DH: Risk of other cancers in individuals with a family history of pancreas cancer. J Gastrointest Cancer; 2007;38(2-4):119-26
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  • [Title] Risk of other cancers in individuals with a family history of pancreas cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Inherited predisposition to pancreas cancer accounts for approximately 10% of cases.
  • Familial aggregation may be influenced by shared environmental factors and shared genes.
  • We evaluate whether a family history of pancreas cancer is a risk factor for ten specified cancers in first-degree relatives: bladder, breast, colon, head and neck, lung, lymphoma, melanoma, ovary, pancreas, and prostate.
  • METHODS: Risk factor data and cancer family history were obtained for 1,816 first-degree relatives of pancreas cancer case probands (n = 247) and 3,157 first-degree relatives of control probands (n = 420).
  • Unconditional logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals of having a first-degree relative a specified cancer.
  • RESULTS: A family history of pancreas cancer was associated with a doubled risk of lymphoma (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.02-7.86) and ovarian cancer (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 0.77-6.60) among relatives after adjustment.
  • Relatives with a family history of early-onset pancreas cancer in a proband had a sevenfold increased risk of lymphoma (OR = 7.31, 95% CI = 1.45 to 36.7).
  • Relatives who ever smoked and had a family history of pancreas cancer had a fivefold increased risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 1.16-20.6).
  • CONCLUSION: Family history assessment of cancer risk should include all cancers.
  • Assessment of other known and suspected risk factors in relatives will improve risk evaluation.
  • As screening and surveillance methods are developed, identifying those at highest risk is crucial for a successful screening program.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Pancreatic Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Case-Control Studies. Family Health. Female. Humans. Interviews as Topic. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Smoking

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  • (PMID = 19089664.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-6628
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gastrointest Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01-CN-65064; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES007129-03; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES07129; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / RC25-CA7716
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS126067; NLM/ PMC2719298
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32. Lemesle G, Bonello L, de Labriolle A, Steinberg DH, Roy P, Pinto Slottow TL, Torguson R, Kaneshige K, Xue Z, Suddath WO, Satler LF, Kent KM, Lindsay J, Pichard AD, Waksman R: Prognostic value of the Syntax score in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting for three-vessel coronary artery disease. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv; 2009 Apr 1;73(5):612-7
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  • During the 1-year follow-up, cardiovascular events including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke were systematically indexed.
  • The primary end point was the composite criteria death/MI/stroke.
  • No statistical difference was found for the composite criteria death/MI/stroke: 9.4% versus 7.5% versus 10.4% in the groups with a Syntax score <24.5, 24.5-34, and >34, respectively (P = 0.754).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • [CommentIn] Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Apr 1;73(5):618-9 [19309708.001]
  • (PMID = 19309700.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-726X
  • [Journal-full-title] Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Catheter Cardiovasc Interv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Gruber SA, West MS, Sillix DH, El-Amm JM, Garnick J, Morawski K, Haririan A: Preliminary results with early corticosteroid withdrawal in African American renal allograft recipients. Surgery; 2005 Oct;138(4):772-8; discussion 778-9
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  • [Title] Preliminary results with early corticosteroid withdrawal in African American renal allograft recipients.
  • BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data regarding the use of steroid-avoidance immunosuppression (SAI) in African American (AA) renal allograft recipients, traditionally considered a high-risk subgroup of patients with higher reported rates of acute rejection and graft loss.
  • METHODS: We compared the outcomes of 27 AA renal allograft recipients receiving SAI (SA group; mean follow-up period, 12 +/- 3 mo) with those of 20 patients receiving a steroid taper (ST group; 24 +/- 11 mo).
  • In both groups, thymoglobulin was used for induction, and mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus were used for maintenance.
  • Four doses of methylprednisolone were given on days 0 to 3.
  • In the SA group no further steroids were given, whereas in the ST group a prednisone taper was continued thereafter.
  • RESULTS: ST patients were more likely to have current panel reactive antibody titers greater than 10%, undergo retransplantation, and receive more doses of thymoglobulin.
  • There were no significant differences between the SA and ST groups with regard to patient survival (96% vs 95%), graft survival (96% vs 90%), acute rejection (11% vs 14%), cytomegalovirus infection (7% vs 10%), posttransplant diabetes mellitus (11% vs 24%), or mean serum creatinine concentration at 6 months (1.6 vs 1.5 mg/dL), respectively, with a trend toward less percent weight gain in SA patients at 6 months (5% vs 11%, P = .06).
  • CONCLUSIONS: SAI can produce excellent short-term results in AA kidney transplant patients when compared with a conventional ST protocol.
  • Our results will need to be verified in larger numbers of patients with longer follow-up evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / administration & dosage. African Americans. Kidney Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Biopsy. Case-Control Studies. Drug Administration Schedule. Graft Rejection / epidemiology. Graft Survival. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Incidence. Kidney / pathology. Leukopenia / epidemiology. Methylprednisolone / administration & dosage. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 16269308.001).
  • [ISSN] 0039-6060
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; VB0R961HZT / Prednisone; X4W7ZR7023 / Methylprednisolone
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34. Kittendorf JD, Beck BJ, Buchholz TJ, Seufert W, Sherman DH: Interrogating the molecular basis for multiple macrolactone ring formation by the pikromycin polyketide synthase. Chem Biol; 2007 Aug;14(8):944-54
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  • [Title] Interrogating the molecular basis for multiple macrolactone ring formation by the pikromycin polyketide synthase.
  • The pikromycin polyketide synthase (PKS) is unique in its ability to generate both 12 and 14 membered ring macrolactones.
  • As such, dissection of the molecular basis for controlling metabolic diversity in this system remains an important objective for understanding modular PKS function and expanding chemical diversity.
  • Here, we describe a series of experiments designed to probe the importance of the protein-protein interaction that occurs between the final two monomodules, PikAIII (module 5) and PikAIV (module 6), for the production of the 12 membered ring macrolactone 10-deoxymethynolide.
  • The results obtained from these in vitro studies demonstrate that PikAIII and PikAIV generate the 12 membered ring macrocycle most efficiently when engaged in their native protein-protein interaction.
  • Accordingly, the data are consistent with PikAIV adopting an alternative conformation that enables the terminal thioesterase domain to directly off-load the PikAIII-bound hexaketide intermediate for macrocyclization.
  • [MeSH-major] Lactones / chemistry. Macrolides / metabolism. Polyketide Synthases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Catalytic Domain. Cyclization. DNA Primers. Esterases / metabolism. Mutagenesis, Site-Directed

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  • (PMID = 17719493.001).
  • [ISSN] 1074-5521
  • [Journal-full-title] Chemistry & biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chem. Biol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM075641; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076477; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076477; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076477-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / DNA Primers; 0 / Lactones; 0 / Macrolides; 79956-01-7 / Polyketide Synthases; EC 3.1.- / Esterases; FBM8G3Z439 / picromycin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS29672; NLM/ PMC2707933
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35. Craig DH, Zhang J, Basson MD: Cytoskeletal signaling by way of alpha-actinin-1 mediates ERK1/2 activation by repetitive deformation in human Caco2 intestinal epithelial cells. Am J Surg; 2007 Nov;194(5):618-22
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  • [Title] Cytoskeletal signaling by way of alpha-actinin-1 mediates ERK1/2 activation by repetitive deformation in human Caco2 intestinal epithelial cells.
  • BACKGROUND: Repetitive deformation stimulates proliferation in human Caco2 intestinal epithelial cells by way of an ERK1/2-dependent pathway.
  • We examined the effects of cytoskeletal perturbation on deformation-induced signaling in Caco2 cells.
  • METHODS: The Caco2 cell cytoskeleton was disrupted with either cytochalasin D, phalloidin, colchicine, or paclitaxel.
  • Levels of alpha-actinin-1 and -4 and paxillin were reduced by specific small interfering RNA.
  • Cells on collagen I-precoated membranes were subjected to 10% repetitive deformation at 10 cycles/min.
  • After 1 hour, cells were lysed for Western blot analysis.
  • RESULTS: Strain-activated ERK1/2, focal adhesion kinase, and Src phosphorylation in dimethyl sulfoxide- and/or nontargeting small interfering RNA-treated control cell populations.
  • Cytochalasin D and paclitaxel, but not phalloidin and colchicine, blocked ERK1/2 phosphorylation.
  • A decrease in alpha-actinin-1, but not in alpha-actinin-4 or paxillin, inhibited ERK1/2 and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, whereas Src activation appears to be independent of these effects.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The intestinal epithelial cell cytoskeleton may transduce mechanical signals by way of alpha-actinin-1 into the focal adhesion complex, culminating in ERK1/2 activation and proliferation.
  • [MeSH-major] Actinin / metabolism. Cytoskeleton / drug effects. Cytoskeleton / physiology. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1 / metabolism. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3 / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Caco-2 Cells. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Humans. Phosphorylation. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 17936423.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1883
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771-06; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771-07; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK60771
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 11003-00-2 / Actinin; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 1; EC 2.7.11.24 / Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase 3
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS32861; NLM/ PMC2084063
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36. Xie C, Sachs JR, Wang DH: Interdependent regulation of afferent renal nerve activity and renal function: role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, neurokinin 1, and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors. J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 2008 Jun;325(3):751-7
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  • [Title] Interdependent regulation of afferent renal nerve activity and renal function: role of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1, neurokinin 1, and calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors.
  • Our previous studies have shown that the activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) expressed in the renal pelvis leads to an increase in ipsilateral afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA) and contralateral renal excretory function, but the molecular mechanisms of TRPV1 action are largely unknown.
  • This study tests the hypothesis that activation of receptors of neurokinin 1 (NK1) or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) by endogenously released substance P (SP) or CGRP following TRPV1 activation, respectively, governs TRPV1-induced increases in ARNA and renal excretory function.
  • Capsaicin (CAP; 0.04, 0.4, and 4 nM), a selective TRPV1 agonist, administered into the renal pelvis dose-dependently increased ARNA.
  • CAP (4 nM)-induced increases in ipsilateral ARNA or contralateral urine flow rate (Uflow) and urinary sodium excretion (UNa) were abolished by capsazepine (CAPZ), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, or 2-[1-imino-2-(2-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]-7,7-diphenyl-4-perhydroisoindolone (3aR,7aR) (RP67580) or cis-2-(diphenylmethyl)-N-[(2-iodophenyl)-methyl]-1 azabicyclo[2.2.2]octan-3-amine (L703,606), selective NK1 antagonists, but not by CGRP8-37, a selective CGRP receptor antagonist.
  • Both SP (7.4 nM) and CGRP (0.13 muM) increased ARNA, Uflow, or UNa, and increases in these parameters induced by CGRP but not SP were abolished by CAPZ.
  • CAP at 4 nM perfused into the renal pelvis caused the release of SP and CGRP, which was blocked by CAPZ but not by RP67580, L703,606, or CGRP8-37.
  • Immunofluorescence results showed that NK1 receptors were expressed in sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglion and sensory nerve fibers innervating the renal pelvis.
  • Taken together, our data indicate that NK1 activation induced by SP release upon TRPV1 activation governs TRPV1 function and that a TRPV1-dependent mechanism is operant in CGRP action.
  • [MeSH-major] Ganglia, Spinal / physiology. Kidney Pelvis / physiology. Neurons, Afferent / physiology. Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / physiology. Receptors, Neurokinin-1 / physiology. Substance P / physiology. TRPV Cation Channels / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / pharmacology. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / urine. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Isoindoles / pharmacology. Male. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists. Peptide Fragments / pharmacology. Quinuclidines / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 18364471.001).
  • [ISSN] 1521-0103
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoindoles; 0 / Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Quinuclidines; 0 / Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; 0 / Receptors, Neurokinin-1; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / Trpv1 protein, rat; 119911-68-1 / calcitonin gene-related peptide (8-37); 135911-02-3 / 7,7-diphenyl-2-(1-imino-2-(2-methoxyphenyl)ethyl)perhydroisoindol-4-one; 144425-84-3 / L 703606; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; 83652-28-2 / Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; LFW48MY844 / capsazepine; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96838; NLM/ PMC2689370
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37. Barr JR, Pierce CL, Smith JR, Capacio BR, Woolfitt AR, Solano MI, Wooten JV, Lemire SW, Thomas JD, Ash DH, Ashley DL: Analysis of urinary metabolites of sulfur mustard in two individuals after accidental exposure. J Anal Toxicol; 2008 Jan-Feb;32(1):10-6
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  • [Title] Analysis of urinary metabolites of sulfur mustard in two individuals after accidental exposure.
  • In July 2004, two individuals developed blisters after the destruction of a WWI-era munition.
  • To determine the causative agent, urine samples were collected from both the highly blistered patient (patient 1; 6.5% of total body surface area) and patient 2, who had only one small blister.
  • Their urine was analyzed for metabolites of known vesicants including sulfur mustard (HD), Lewisite (L1), and nitrogen mustards.
  • The urine samples only tested positive for metabolites of HD.
  • Additional metabolites were measured to confirm the exposure of sulfur mustard agent HD, including thiodiglycol (TDG), TDG-sulfoxide, and the bis-mercapturate of mustard sulfone.
  • On day 2 after the exposure, patient 1 had a beta-lyase metabolite level of 41 ng/mL, and patient 2 had a level of 2.6 ng/mL.
  • Detectable levels of the beta-lyase metabolite were observed in patient 1 for 11 days and in patient 2 for 7 days.
  • Levels of TDG and both TDG and its sulfoxide measured together in the urine of patient 1 were found to be 24 ng/mL and 50 ng/mL, respectively, on day 2.
  • The bis-mercapturate of mustard sulfone was detected in patient 1 (3.1 ng/mL) on day 2 but was not detected in samples taken on subsequent days.
  • [MeSH-major] Environmental Monitoring / methods. Mustard Gas / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomarkers / urine. Chromatography, Liquid. Environmental Exposure / analysis. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Humans. Lyases / metabolism. Sulfhydryl Compounds / urine. Sulfoxides / urine. Tandem Mass Spectrometry

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  • (PMID = 18269787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0146-4760
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of analytical toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Anal Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biomarkers; 0 / Sulfhydryl Compounds; 0 / Sulfoxides; 2580-77-0 / 2,2'-sulfinylbisethanol; 9BW5T43J04 / 2,2'-thiodiethanol; EC 4.- / Lyases; T8KEC9FH9P / Mustard Gas
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38. Spencer AU, Neaga A, West B, Safran J, Brown P, Btaiche I, Kuzma-O'Reilly B, Teitelbaum DH: Pediatric short bowel syndrome: redefining predictors of success. Ann Surg; 2005 Sep;242(3):403-9; discussion 409-12
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  • [Title] Pediatric short bowel syndrome: redefining predictors of success.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine predictors of survival and of weaning off parenteral nutrition (PN) in pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients.
  • SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pediatric SBS carries extensive morbidity and high mortality, but factors believed to predict survival or weaning from PN have been based on limited studies.
  • This study reviews outcomes of a large number of SBS infants and identifies predictors of success.
  • METHODS: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted on 80 pediatric SBS patients.
  • Primary outcome was survival; secondary outcome was ability to wean off PN.
  • Nonsignificant covariates were eliminated.
  • P < 0.05 was considered significant.
  • RESULTS: Over a mean of 5.1 years of follow-up, survival was 58 of 80 (72.5%) and 51 weaned off PN (63.8%).
  • Cholestasis (conjugated bilirubin > or =2.5 mg/dL) was the strongest predictor of mortality (relative risk [RR] 22.7, P = 0.005).
  • Although absolute small bowel length was only slightly predictive, percentage of normal bowel length (for a given infant's gestational age) was strongly predictive of mortality (if <10% of normal length, RR of death was 5.7, P = 0.003) and of weaning PN (if > or =10% of normal, RR of weaning PN was 11.8, P = 0.001).
  • Presence of the ileocecal valve (ICV) also strongly predicted weaning PN (RR 3.9, P < 0.0005); however, ICV was not predictive of survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cholestasis and age-adjusted small bowel length are the major predictors of mortality in pediatric SBS.
  • Age-adjusted small bowel length and ICV are the major predictors of weaning from PN.
  • These data permit better prediction of outcomes of pediatric SBS, which may help to direct future management of these challenging patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena. Parenteral Nutrition. Short Bowel Syndrome / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Cholestasis / etiology. Cholestasis / mortality. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Organ Size / drug effects. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis

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  • (PMID = 16135926.001).
  • [ISSN] 0003-4932
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1357748
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39. Esper DH, Coplin WM, Carhuapoma JR: Energy expenditure in patients with nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr; 2006 Mar-Apr;30(2):71-5
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  • [Title] Energy expenditure in patients with nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with intracerebral (ICH), intraventricular (IVH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have increased morbidity and mortality compared with other forms of stroke.
  • We postulate that the systemic inflammatory state triggered by these forms of nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage (IH) translates into higher nutrition requirements than traditionally assumed.
  • In order to test this hypothesis, we performed a retrospective study comparing the resting energy expenditure (REE) of 14 mechanically ventilated IH patients with the REE of 6 severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) patients (a disease known to induce an increased metabolic state).
  • METHODS: Using nonparametric analysis, we compared 2 contemporary cohorts of patients-IH and sTBI-who required mechanical ventilation and who underwent indirect calorimetry (IC) within 7 days after the ictus.
  • RESULTS: Fourteen patients with nontraumatic IH (IVH, 2; SAH, 9; SAH/ICH, 1; ICH/SAH/IVH, 2) who underwent IC within 7 days from injury were identified; median age: 59 (28-84) years, median admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS): 6 (4-9), and median APACHE II: 19.5 (15-28).
  • A control cohort of 6 patients with sTBI was identified; median age: 57.5 (18-80) years, admission GCS: 6.5 (4-8), and APACHE II: 16 (11-31).
  • Sedation was used in 11/14 patients with IH and in 5/6 severe TBI patients.
  • No patient was pharmacologically paralyzed.
  • Median REE was 1810 (1124-2806) and 2238 (1860-2780) kcal/d for the IH and for the sTBI patient cohorts, respectively.
  • Using Wilcoxon signed ranks test, the 2 patient groups were found comparable in regard to baseline clinical variables and disease severity (APACHE II).
  • We did not identify a statistically significant difference in the REE between these 2 cohorts of patients (p = .25).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe TBI and patients with IH have similar increments in metabolic rate during the initial phase (1 week from onset) of their disease.
  • This information needs to be confirmed in a larger cohort of patients.
  • If reproduced, our results suggest that nontraumatic IH patients are at high risk of inadequate nutrition if their metabolic rate is estimated after conventional nutrition practice.
  • [MeSH-major] Energy Metabolism / physiology. Intracranial Hemorrhages / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] APACHE. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Brain Injuries / metabolism. Calorimetry, Indirect. Cerebral Hemorrhage / metabolism. Energy Intake. Humans. Middle Aged. Nutritional Requirements. Respiration, Artificial. Rest. Retrospective Studies. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16517949.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-6071
  • [Journal-full-title] JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. Coker RH, Williams RH, Kortebein PM, Sullivan DH, Evans WJ: Influence of exercise intensity on abdominal fat and adiponectin in elderly adults. Metab Syndr Relat Disord; 2009 Aug;7(4):363-8
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  • To examine the influence of moderate-intensity (50% of VO(2peak)) exercise training (MI) versus high-intensity (75% of VO(2peak)) exercise training (HI) on regional fat distribution and plasma adiponectin, we randomized 18 overweight (body mass index [BMI] = 30 +/- 1 kg/m(2)) elderly (71 +/- 1 years) to HI, MI, or a control group (CON).
  • Subjects enrolled in HI or MI completed a 12-week exercise training protocol designed to expend 1000 kcal/week.
  • VO(2peak) improved in HI and MI, whereas there was no change in VO(2peak) in CON.
  • No significant change in body weight, BMI, and % fat occurred in MI, HI, or CON.
  • Although there was a significant reduction in visceral fat with HI (-39 cm(2)), there was no change in the MI or CON groups.
  • There were no changes in thigh muscle attenuation in the MI and CON groups.
  • Also, there was no change in plasma adiponectin in the MI, HI, or CON groups.

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  • (PMID = 19196080.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8518
  • [Journal-full-title] Metabolic syndrome and related disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Metab Syndr Relat Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K01 DK 64716-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR14288; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG 19346-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3135883
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41. Roy P, Buch AN, Javaid A, Okabe T, Raya V, Pinto Slottow TL, Steinberg DH, Smith K, Xue Z, Gevorkian N, Satler LF, Kent KM, Suddath WO, Pichard AD, Lindsay J, Waksman R: Impact of "off-label" utilization of drug-eluting stents on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Am J Cardiol; 2008 Feb 1;101(3):293-9
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  • Safety concerns have arisen from recent reports that suggested increased mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) with DES usage.
  • The primary endpoint was major adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, nonfatal Q-wave myocardial infarction [MI], and target vessel revascularization) at 12 months.
  • There was no significant difference in freedom from cardiac death or nonfatal Q-wave MI between groups (p=0.27).
  • "Off-label" DES use was not associated with increased rates of cardiac death and nonfatal MI at 12 months.

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  • (PMID = 18237587.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Severson WE, McDowell M, Ananthan S, Chung DH, Rasmussen L, Sosa MI, White EL, Noah J, Jonsson CB: High-throughput screening of a 100,000-compound library for inhibitors of influenza A virus (H3N2). J Biomol Screen; 2008 Oct;13(9):879-87
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  • [Title] High-throughput screening of a 100,000-compound library for inhibitors of influenza A virus (H3N2).
  • Using a highly reproducible and robust cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay, the authors screened a 100,000-compound library at 14- and 114-microM compound concentration against influenza strain A/Udorn/72 (H3N2).
  • The "hit" rates (>50% inhibition of the viral cytopathic effect) from the 14- and 114-microM screens were 0.022% and 0.38%, respectively.
  • The hits were evaluated for their antiviral activity, cell toxicity, and selectivity in dose-response experiments.
  • The screen at the lower concentration yielded 3 compounds, which displayed moderate activity (SI(50) = 10-49).
  • Intriguingly, the screen at the higher concentration revealed several additional hits.
  • Two of these hits were highly active with an SI(50) > 50.
  • Time of addition experiments revealed 1 compound that inhibited early and 4 other compounds that inhibited late in the virus life cycle, suggesting they affect entry and replication, respectively.
  • The active compounds represent several different classes of molecules such as carboxanilides, 1-benzoyl-3-arylthioureas, sulfonamides, and benzothiazinones, which have not been previously identified as having antiviral/anti-influenza activity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical / methods. Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Automation. Cell Line. Chemistry, Pharmaceutical / methods. Dogs. Drug Design. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Models, Chemical. Ribavirin / pharmacology. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18812571.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-0571
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomolecular screening
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Biomol Screen
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01 AI015449; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01-AI-15449; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01-AI-30047
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 49717AWG6K / Ribavirin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS153445; NLM/ PMC2782602
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43. Aittaleb M, Gao G, Evelyn CR, Neubig RR, Tesmer JJ: A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells. Cell Signal; 2009 Nov;21(11):1569-78
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  • The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.
  • In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF.

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  • (PMID = 19560536.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-3913
  • [Journal-full-title] Cellular signalling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell. Signal.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / 5R01GM039561; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL071818; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL086865; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM039561; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM039561-19; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM039561-20; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818-01A1; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL086865; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL086865-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ARHGEF12 protein, human; 0 / Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors; 0 / Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors; EC 3.6.5.1 / GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, G12-G13; EC 3.6.5.2 / rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS128265; NLM/ PMC2735620
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44. Kotsis DH, Masko EM, Sigoillot FD, Di Gregorio R, Guy-Evans HI, Evans DR: Protein kinase A phosphorylation of the multifunctional protein CAD antagonizes activation by the MAP kinase cascade. Mol Cell Biochem; 2007 Jul;301(1-2):69-81
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  • [Title] Protein kinase A phosphorylation of the multifunctional protein CAD antagonizes activation by the MAP kinase cascade.
  • The flux through the de novo pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway is controlled by the multifunctional protein CAD, which catalyzes the first three steps.
  • The cell cycle dependent regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis is a consequence of sequential phosphorylation of CAD Thr456 and Ser1406 by the MAP kinase and PKA cascades, respectively.
  • Coordinated regulation of the pathway requires precise timing of the two phosphorylation events.
  • These studies show that phosphorylation of purified CAD by PKA antagonizes MAP kinase phosphorylation, and vice versa.
  • Similar results were observed in vivo.
  • Forskolin activation of PKA in BHK-21 cells resulted in a 8.5 fold increase in Ser1406 phosphorylation and severely curtailed the MAP kinase mediated phosphorylation of CAD Thr456.
  • Moreover, the relative activity of MAP kinase and PKA was found to determine the extent of Thr456 phosphorylation.
  • Transfectants expressing elevated levels of MAP kinase resulted in a 11-fold increase in Thr456 phosphorylation, whereas transfectants that overexpress PKA reduced Thr456 phosphorylation 5-fold.
  • While phosphorylation of one site by one kinase may induce conformational changes that interfere with phosphorylation by the other, the observation that both MAP kinase and PKA form stable complexes with CAD suggest that the mutual antagonism is the result of steric interference by the bound kinases.
  • The reciprocal antagonism of CAD phosphorylation by MAP kinase and PKA provides an elegant mechanism to coordinate the cell cycle-dependent regulation of pyrimidine biosynthesis ensuring that signals for up- and down-regulation of the pathway do not conflict.
  • [MeSH-major] Aspartate Carbamoyltransferase / metabolism. Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase (Glutamine-Hydrolyzing) / metabolism. Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases / metabolism. Dihydroorotase / metabolism. MAP Kinase Signaling System / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase (Ammonia) / metabolism. Cell Line. Colforsin / metabolism. Cricetinae. Cricetulus. Enzyme Activation. Enzyme Inhibitors / metabolism. Epidermal Growth Factor / metabolism. Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases / metabolism. Phosphorylation. Protein Subunits / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17206380.001).
  • [ISSN] 0300-8177
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular and cellular biochemistry
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Cell. Biochem.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / GM/CA 60371; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM47399
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / CAD trifunctional enzyme; 0 / Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Protein Subunits; 1F7A44V6OU / Colforsin; 62229-50-9 / Epidermal Growth Factor; EC 2.1.3.2 / Aspartate Carbamoyltransferase; EC 2.7.11.11 / Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases; EC 2.7.11.24 / Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases; EC 3.5.2.3 / Dihydroorotase; EC 6.3.4.16 / Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase (Ammonia); EC 6.3.5.5 / Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase (Glutamine-Hydrolyzing)
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45. Lima AR, Martinez PF, Okoshi K, Guizoni DM, Zornoff LA, Campos DH, Oliveira SA Jr, Bonomo C, Pai-Silva MD, Okoshi MP: Myostatin and follistatin expression in skeletal muscles of rats with chronic heart failure. Int J Exp Pathol; 2010 Feb;91(1):54-62
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  • Heart failure was induced by myocardial infarction (MI, n = 10); results were compared to Sham-operated group (n = 10).
  • MI group presented heart failure evidence such as pleural effusion and right ventricular hypertrophy.
  • Left ventricular dilation and dysfunction were observed in MI group.
  • In the soleus muscle, cross-sectional area (P = 0.006) and follistatin protein levels (Sham 1.00 +/- 0.36; MI 0.18 +/- 0.06 arbitrary units; P = 0.03) were lower in MI and there was a trend for follistatin gene expression to be lower in MI group (P = 0.085).
  • In gastrocnemius, all MI group parameters were statistically similar to the Sham.

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  • (PMID = 20002838.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2613
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of experimental pathology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Exp Pathol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Follistatin; 0 / Gdf8 protein, rat; 0 / Myostatin; 0 / RNA, Messenger
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2812728
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46. Craig DH, Haimovich B, Basson MD: Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol; 2007 Dec;293(6):C1862-74
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  • [Title] Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction.
  • Physical forces including pressure, strain, and shear can be converted into intracellular signals that regulate diverse aspects of cell biology.
  • Exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulates colon cancer cell adhesion by a beta(1)-integrin-dependent mechanism that requires an intact cytoskeleton and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. alpha-Actinin facilitates focal adhesion formation and physically links integrin-associated focal adhesion complexes with the cytoskeleton.
  • We therefore hypothesized that alpha-actinin may be necessary for the mechanical response pathway that mediates pressure-stimulated cell adhesion.
  • We reduced alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 expression with isoform-specific small interfering (si)RNA.
  • Silencing of alpha-actinin-1, but not alpha-actinin-4, blocked pressure-stimulated cell adhesion in human SW620, HT-29, and Caco-2 colon cancer cell lines.
  • Cell exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulated alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and alpha-actinin-1 interaction with FAK and/or Src, and enhanced FAK phosphorylation at residues Y397 and Y576.
  • The requirement for alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation in the pressure response was investigated by expressing the alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation mutant Y12F in the colon cancer cells.
  • Expression of Y12F blocked pressure-mediated adhesion and inhibited the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 with FAK and Src, as well as FAK activation.
  • Furthermore, siRNA-mediated reduction of alpha-actinin-1 eliminated the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 and Src with beta(1)-integrin receptor, as well as FAK-Src complex formation.
  • These results suggest that alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation at Y12 plays a crucial role in pressure-activated cell adhesion and mechanotransduction by facilitating Src recruitment to beta(1)-integrin, and consequently the association of FAK with Src, to enhance FAK phosphorylation.
  • [MeSH-major] Actinin / metabolism. Carcinoma / metabolism. Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Mechanotransduction, Cellular / physiology. src-Family Kinases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD29 / metabolism. Blotting, Western. Caco-2 Cells. Cell Adhesion / physiology. Gene Silencing. HT29 Cells. Humans. Immunoprecipitation. Mutation. Phosphorylation. Pressure. RNA, Small Interfering. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 17898132.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6143
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Cell physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK06771
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ACTN1 protein, human; 0 / Antigens, CD29; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 11003-00-2 / Actinin; EC 2.7.10.2 / Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.2 / src-Family Kinases
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47. Siri JG, Wilson ML, Murray S, Rosen DH, Vulule JM, Slutsker L, Lindblade KA: Significance of travel to rural areas as a risk factor for malarial anemia in an urban setting. Am J Trop Med Hyg; 2010 Mar;82(3):391-7
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  • [Title] Significance of travel to rural areas as a risk factor for malarial anemia in an urban setting.
  • The epidemiology of malaria in urban environments is poorly characterized, yet increasingly problematic.
  • We conducted an unmatched case-control study of risk factors for malarial anemia with high parasitemia in urban Kisumu, Kenya, from June 2002 through February 2003.
  • Cases (n = 80) were hospital patients with a hemoglobin level < or = 8 g/dL and a Plasmodium parasite density > or = 10,000/microL.
  • Controls (n = 826) were healthy respondents to a concurrent citywide knowledge, attitude, and practice survey.
  • Children who reported spending at least one night per month in a rural area were especially at risk (35% of cases; odds ratio = 9.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.4-19.7, P < 0.0001), and use of mosquito coils, bed net ownership, and house construction were non-significant, potentially indicating that malaria exposure during rural travel comprises an important element of risk.
  • Control of severe malaria in an urban setting may be complicated by Plasmodium infections acquired elsewhere.
  • Epidemiologic studies of urban malaria in low transmission settings should take travel history into account.
  • [MeSH-major] Malaria / epidemiology. Rural Population. Travel. Urban Population
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Infant. Kenya. Logistic Models. Odds Ratio. Risk Factors

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  • (PMID = 20207862.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-1645
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2829898
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48. Wang Y, Kaminski NE, Wang DH: Endocannabinoid regulates blood pressure via activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 in Wistar rats fed a high-salt diet. J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 2007 May;321(2):763-9
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  • [Title] Endocannabinoid regulates blood pressure via activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 in Wistar rats fed a high-salt diet.
  • This study was designed to examine the role of the endocannabinoids in blood pressure regulation during high sodium (HS) intake.
  • HS (4% Na+ by weight) intake for 3 weeks increased baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) compared with normal sodium (NS, 0.4% Na+ by weight)-treated male Wistar rats.
  • Capsazepine (3 mg/kg), a selective transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, caused a greater increase in MAP (mm Hg) in HS-treated compared with NS-treated rats (13+/-3 versus 4+/-2, p<0.05), whereas calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) dose-dependently decreased MAP in both HS- and NS-treated rats with a more profound effect in the former.
  • HS increased plasma anandamide levels analyzed by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (NS, 2.40+/-0.31 versus HS, 4.05+/-0.47 pmol/ml, p<0.05) and plasma CGRP levels determined by radioimmunoassay (NS, 36.6+/-3.8 versus HS, 55.7+/-6.4 pg/ml, p<0.05).
  • Methanandamide, a metabolically stable analog of anandamide, caused a greater CGRP release in mesenteric arteries isolated from HS-treated compared with NS-treated rats.
  • Western blot showed that expression of receptor activity-modifying protein 1, a subunit of the CGRP receptor, in mesenteric arteries was greater in HS-treated compared with NS-treated rats.
  • These results show that HS intake increases production of anandamide, which may serve as an endovanilloid to activate TRPV1, leading to release of CGRP to blunt salt-induced increases in blood pressure.
  • These data support the notion that TRPV1 may act as a molecular target for salt-induced elevation of endovanilloid compounds to regulate blood pressure.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Pressure. Cannabinoid Receptor Modulators / physiology. Endocannabinoids. Sodium Chloride, Dietary / administration & dosage. TRPV Cation Channels / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Arachidonic Acids / biosynthesis. Arachidonic Acids / pharmacology. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / secretion. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Hypertension / drug therapy. Male. Polyunsaturated Alkamides. Rats. Rats, Wistar


49. Wallace JM, Rajachar RM, Allen MR, Bloomfield SA, Robey PG, Young MF, Kohn DH: Exercise-induced changes in the cortical bone of growing mice are bone- and gender-specific. Bone; 2007 Apr;40(4):1120-7
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  • [Title] Exercise-induced changes in the cortical bone of growing mice are bone- and gender-specific.
  • Fracture risk and mechanical competence of bone are functions of bone mass and tissue quality, which in turn are dependent on the bone's mechanical environment.
  • Male mice have a greater response to non-weight-bearing exercise than females, resulting in larger, stronger bones compared with control animals.
  • The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that short-term weight-bearing running during growth (21 days starting at 8 weeks of age; 30 min/day; 12 m/min; 5 degrees incline; 7 days/week) would similarly have a greater impact on cross-sectional geometry and mechanical competence in the femora and tibiae of male mice versus females.
  • Based on the orientation of the legs during running and the proximity of the tibia to the point of impact, this response was hypothesized to be greatest in the tibia.
  • Exercise-related changes relative to controls were assayed by four-point bending tests, while volumetric bone mineral density and cross-sectional geometry were also assessed.
  • The response to running was bone- and gender-specific, with male tibiae demonstrating the greatest effects.
  • In male tibiae, periosteal perimeter, endocortical perimeter, cortical area, medial-lateral width and bending moment of inertia increased versus control mice suggesting that while growth is occurring in these mice between 8 and 11 weeks of age, exercise accelerated this growth resulting in a greater increase in bone tissue over the 3 weeks of the study.
  • Exercise increased tissue-level strain-to-failure and structural post-yield deformation in the male tibiae, but these post-yield benefits came at the expense of decreased yield deformation, structural and tissue-level yield strength and tissue-level ultimate strength.
  • These results suggest that exercise superimposed upon growth accelerated growth-related increases in tibial cross-sectional dimensions.
  • Exercise also influenced the quality of this forming bone, significantly impacting structural and tissue-level mechanical properties.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone and Bones / anatomy & histology. Bone and Bones / physiology. Physical Exertion / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomechanical Phenomena. Bone Density. Bone Development / physiology. Female. Femur / anatomy & histology. Femur / physiology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Running / physiology. Sex Characteristics. Tibia / anatomy & histology. Tibia / physiology

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  • (PMID = 17240210.001).
  • [ISSN] 8756-3282
  • [Journal-full-title] Bone
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Bone
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R90 DK071506; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R90 DK071506-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R90-DK071506; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / T32 DE007057; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / T32 DE007057-28; United States / NIDCR NIH HHS / DE / T32-DE07057
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS20910; NLM/ PMC2729655
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50. Lee JY, Janes BK, Passalacqua KD, Pfleger BF, Bergman NH, Liu H, Håkansson K, Somu RV, Aldrich CC, Cendrowski S, Hanna PC, Sherman DH: Biosynthetic analysis of the petrobactin siderophore pathway from Bacillus anthracis. J Bacteriol; 2007 Mar;189(5):1698-710
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  • [Title] Biosynthetic analysis of the petrobactin siderophore pathway from Bacillus anthracis.
  • The asbABCDEF gene cluster from Bacillus anthracis is responsible for biosynthesis of petrobactin, a catecholate siderophore that functions in both iron acquisition and virulence in a murine model of anthrax.
  • We initiated studies to determine the biosynthetic details of petrobactin assembly based on mutational analysis of the asb operon, identification of accumulated intermediates, and addition of exogenous siderophores to asb mutant strains.
  • As a starting point, in-frame deletions of each of the genes in the asb locus (asbABCDEF) were constructed.
  • The individual mutations resulted in complete abrogation of petrobactin biosynthesis when strains were grown on iron-depleted medium.
  • However, in vitro analysis showed that each asb mutant grew to a very limited extent as vegetative cells in iron-depleted medium.
  • In contrast, none of the B. anthracis asb mutant strains were able to outgrow from spores under the same culture conditions.
  • Provision of exogenous petrobactin was able to rescue the growth defect in each asb mutant strain.
  • Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence that AsbA performs the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of petrobactin, involving condensation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidine with citrate to form 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidinyl citrate.
  • As a final step, the data reveal that AsbB catalyzes condensation of a second molecule of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidine with 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidinyl citrate to form the mature siderophore.
  • This work sets the stage for detailed biochemical studies with this unique acyl carrier protein-dependent, nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent biosynthetic system.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacillus anthracis / metabolism. Benzamides / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Genetic Complementation Test. Iron / metabolism. Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Sequence Data. Mutation. Operon

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  • (PMID = 17189355.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9193
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of bacteriology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Bacteriol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzamides; 0 / petrobactin; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1855748
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51. Shankaranarayanan A, Boguth CA, Lutz S, Vettel C, Uhlemann F, Aittaleb M, Wieland T, Tesmer JJ: Galpha q allosterically activates and relieves autoinhibition of p63RhoGEF. Cell Signal; 2010 Jul;22(7):1114-23
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  • We next identify specific structural elements in the PH domain that inhibit basal nucleotide exchange activity, and provide evidence that G alpha(q) overcomes this inhibition by altering the conformation of the alpha 6-alpha N linker that joins the DH and PH domains, a region that forms direct contacts with RhoA.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20214977.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-3913
  • [Journal-full-title] Cellular signalling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell. Signal.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL071818; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL086865; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL086865; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL086865-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors; 0 / Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors; 0 / p63RhoGEF protein, human; EC 3.6.5.1 / GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gq-G11
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS186458; NLM/ PMC2862694
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52. Lee JH, Yang DH, Park HS, Cho Y, Jeong MH, Kim YJ, Kim KS, Hur SH, Seong IW, Hong TJ, Cho MC, Kim CJ, Jun JE, Park WH, Chae SC, Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry Investigators: Suboptimal use of evidence-based medical therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry: prescription rate, predictors, and prognostic value. Am Heart J; 2010 Jun;159(6):1012-9
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  • METHODS: Between November 2005 and January 2008, we evaluated the discharge medications among 9,294 post-MI survivors who did not have any documented contraindications to antiplatelet drugs, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is)/angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), or statins in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20569714.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6744
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Prescription Drugs
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53. Klaver D, Hung AC, Gasperini R, Foa L, Aguilar MI, Small DH: Effect of heparin on APP metabolism and Abeta production in cortical neurons. Neurodegener Dis; 2010;7(1-3):187-9
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  • [Title] Effect of heparin on APP metabolism and Abeta production in cortical neurons.
  • BACKGROUND: The beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is a major target for drug design in Alzheimer's disease.
  • BACE1 binds strongly to heparin and other glycosaminoglycans, and there is evidence that the enzyme may interact with proteoglycans in vivo.
  • Several studies suggest that heparin or heparan sulfate analogues may have value as therapeutic agents for the treatment of AD.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether heparin can inhibit Abeta production in cortical neurons by inhibiting BACE1.
  • METHODS: Cortical neurons from APP (SW) Tg2576 mice were incubated with heparin and the amount of APP processing and Abeta production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting.
  • RESULTS: Treatment of cortical neurons with heparin inhibited Abeta secretion.
  • However, this effect was not mediated via inhibition of BACE1.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Heparin or other glycosaminoglycans may have value for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
  • However, the data do not support the view that a heparin-induced decrease in Abeta secretion is due to inhibition of BACE1.
  • [MeSH-major] Amyloid beta-Peptides / metabolism. Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor / metabolism. Cerebral Cortex / cytology. Fibrinolytic Agents / pharmacology. Heparin / pharmacology. Neurons / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases / metabolism. Animals. Animals, Newborn. Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases / metabolism. Cells, Cultured. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Humans. Mice. Mice, Transgenic

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 20224283.001).
  • [ISSN] 1660-2862
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-degenerative diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurodegener Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amyloid beta-Peptides; 0 / Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor; 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 9005-49-6 / Heparin; EC 3.4.- / Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases; EC 3.4.23.- / Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.23.46 / Bace1 protein, mouse
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54. Koga H, Yang H, Haxhija EQ, Teitelbaum DH: The role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor on intestinal epithelial cells following small bowel resection in a mouse model. Pediatr Surg Int; 2008 Dec;24(12):1279-86
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  • [Title] The role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor on intestinal epithelial cells following small bowel resection in a mouse model.
  • AIM: We have previously shown that inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) significantly reduced intestinal epithelial cell (EC) apoptosis and improved morphometric intestinal adaptation in a mouse model of massive small-bowel resection (SBR).
  • This study attempted to further examine the downstream signaling factors in this system by blocking the action of angiotensin II (ATII), hypothesizing that this would lead to similar improvement of intestinal adaptation after SBR.
  • METHOD: Two groups of mice (C57BL/6J) underwent either a 60% mid-intestinal resection (SBR group) or a transection/re-anastomosis (Sham group).
  • Because real-time PCR studies showed that only ATII receptor type 1a (ATII-1a) expression was significantly increased after SBR, compared to SHAM mice, we decided to use the specific ATII-1a receptor antagonist Losartan to block this signaling pathway.
  • An additional two groups of mice received daily i.p. injections of Losartan (SBR + Losartan and Sham + Losartan group).
  • At 7 days, the adaptive response was assessed in the remnant gut including villus height, crypt depth, EC apoptosis (TUNEL staining) and proliferation (BrdU incorporation).
  • The apoptotic and proliferation signaling pathways were addressed by analysis of EC mRNA expression.
  • RESULT: SBR (with and without Losartan) led to a significant increase in villus height and crypt depth.
  • Losartan treatment did not significantly change EC proliferation, but did significantly reduce EC apoptosis rates as compared to the non-treated SBR group.
  • Losartan treatment was associated with a significant reduction of the bax-to-bcl-2 ratio and TNF-alpha expression after SBR compared to non-treated groups.
  • Interestingly, Losartan-treated groups showed a tremendous increase in proliferation of signaling factors EGFR, KGFR and IL7R, which may indicate an expanded potential for further intestinal adaptation also beyond 7 days after SBR.
  • CONCLUSION: This study showed that the ATII-1a receptor may be of crucial importance for the modulation of intestinal EC apoptosis, and for regulating the post-resectional EC adaptive response.
  • [MeSH-major] Epithelial Cells / physiology. Intestine, Small / drug effects. Intestine, Small / physiology. Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological / drug effects. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / pharmacology. Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Intestinal Mucosa / drug effects. Intestinal Mucosa / physiology. Losartan / pharmacology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Models, Animal. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 18989682.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric surgery international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Surg. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 2R01-AI044076-10; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-08; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-09; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1; JMS50MPO89 / Losartan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS169214; NLM/ PMC2814528
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55. Wang Y, Wang DH: Aggravated renal inflammatory responses in TRPV1 gene knockout mice subjected to DOCA-salt hypertension. Am J Physiol Renal Physiol; 2009 Dec;297(6):F1550-9
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  • [Title] Aggravated renal inflammatory responses in TRPV1 gene knockout mice subjected to DOCA-salt hypertension.
  • To test the hypothesis that deletion of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel exaggerates hypertension-induced renal inflammatory response, wild-type (WT) or TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1(-/-)) mice were subjected to uninephrectomy and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment for 4 wk.
  • Mean arterial pressure (MAP) determined by radiotelemetry increased in DOCA-salt-treated WT or TRPV1(-/-) mice, whereas there was no difference in MAP between two strains at the baseline or after DOCA-salt treatment.
  • DOCA-salt treatment increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane in both WT and TRPV1(-/-) mice, and the increases were greater in magnitude in the latter strain.
  • Periodic acid-Schiff and Mason's trichrome staining showed that kidneys of DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1(-/-) mice exhibited more severe glomerulosclerosis and tubulointerstitial injury compared with DOCA-salt-treated WT mice.
  • NF-kappaB assay showed that DOCA-salt treatment increased renal activated NF-kappaB concentrations in TRPV1(-/-) mice compared with WT mice.
  • Immunostaining and ELISA assay revealed that DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1(-/-) mice had enhanced renal infiltration of monocyte/macrophage and lymphocyte, as well as increased renal levels of proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-alpha, IL-6) and chemokine (MCP-1) compared with DOCA-salt-treated WT mice.
  • Renal ICAM-1 but not VCAM-1 expression was also greater in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1(-/-) than WT mice.
  • Dexamethasone (DEXA), an immunosuppressive drug, conveyed a renoprotective effect that was greater in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1(-/-) compared with WT mice.
  • These data show that renal inflammation is exacerbated in DOCA-salt hypertension when TRPV1 gene is deleted and that the deterioration is ameliorated by DEXA treatment, indicating that TRPV1 may act as a potential regulator of the inflammatory process to lessen renal injury in DOCA-salt hypertension.
  • [MeSH-major] Desoxycorticosterone. Hypertension / chemically induced. Hypertension / complications. Nephritis / etiology. Sodium Chloride. TRPV Cation Channels / deficiency
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure. Chemokine CCL2 / metabolism. Dexamethasone / pharmacology. Immunosuppressive Agents / pharmacology. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1 / metabolism. Interleukin-6 / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism. Kidney / pathology. Leukemic Infiltration. Male. Mice. Mice, Knockout. NF-kappa B / metabolism. Severity of Illness Index. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19794112.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-1466
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Renal physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ccl2 protein, mouse; 0 / Chemokine CCL2; 0 / Immunosuppressive Agents; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / NF-kappa B; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / TRPV1 protein, mouse; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 126547-89-5 / Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1; 40GP35YQ49 / Desoxycorticosterone; 451W47IQ8X / Sodium Chloride; 7S5I7G3JQL / Dexamethasone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2801340
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56. Obare SO, De C, Guo W, Haywood TL, Samuels TA, Adams CP, Masika NO, Murray DH, Anderson GA, Campbell K, Fletcher K: Fluorescent chemosensors for toxic organophosphorus pesticides: a review. Sensors (Basel); 2010;10(7):7018-43
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Fluorescent chemosensors for toxic organophosphorus pesticides: a review.
  • Many organophosphorus (OP) based compounds are highly toxic and powerful inhibitors of cholinesterases that generate serious environmental and human health concerns.
  • Organothiophosphates with a thiophosphoryl (P=S) functional group constitute a broad class of these widely used pesticides.
  • They are related to the more reactive phosphoryl (P=O) organophosphates, which include very lethal nerve agents and chemical warfare agents, such as, VX, Soman and Sarin.
  • Unfortunately, widespread and frequent commercial use of OP-based compounds in agricultural lands has resulted in their presence as residues in crops, livestock, and poultry products and also led to their migration into aquifers.
  • Thus, the design of new sensors with improved analyte selectivity and sensitivity is of paramount importance in this area.
  • Herein, we review recent advances in the development of fluorescent chemosensors for toxic OP pesticides and related compounds.
  • We also discuss challenges and progress towards the design of future chemosensors with dual modes for signal transduction.
  • [MeSH-major] Fluorescent Dyes / analysis. Organophosphorus Compounds / analysis. Pesticides / analysis

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Pesticides.
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  • (PMID = 22163587.001).
  • [ISSN] 1424-8220
  • [Journal-full-title] Sensors (Basel, Switzerland)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sensors (Basel)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Fluorescent Dyes; 0 / Organophosphorus Compounds; 0 / Pesticides
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3231149
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; dual modes of signal transduction / fluorescent chemosensors / organophosphorus compounds / pollutants
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57. Kass DH, Schaetz BA, Beitler L, Bonney KM, Jamison N, Wiesner C: Guinea pig ID-like families of SINEs. Gene; 2009 May 1;436(1-2):23-9
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  • [Title] Guinea pig ID-like families of SINEs.
  • Previous studies have indicated a paucity of SINEs within the genomes of the guinea pig and nutria, representatives of the Hystricognathi suborder of rodents.
  • More recent work has shown that the guinea pig genome contains a large number of B1 elements, expanding to various levels among different rodents.
  • In this work we utilized A-B PCR and screened GenBank with sequences from isolated clones to identify potentially uncharacterized SINEs within the guinea pig genome, and identified numerous sequences with a high degree of similarity (>92%) specific to the guinea pig.
  • The presence of A-tails and flanking direct repeats associated with these sequences supported the identification of a full-length SINE, with a consensus sequence notably distinct from other rodent SINEs.
  • Although most similar to the ID SINE, it clearly was not derived from the known ID master gene (BC1), hence we refer to this element as guinea pig ID-like (GPIDL).
  • Using the consensus to screen the guinea pig genomic database (Assembly CavPor2) with Ensembl BlastView, we estimated at least 100,000 copies, which contrasts markedly to just over 100 copies of ID elements.
  • Additionally we provided evidence of recent integrations of GPIDL as two of seven analyzed conserved GPIDL-containing loci demonstrated presence/absence variants in Cavia porcellus and C. aperea.
  • Using intra-IDL PCR and sequence analyses we also provide evidence that GPIDL is derived from a hystricognath-specific SINE family.
  • These results demonstrate that this SINE family continues to contribute to the dynamics of genomes of hystricognath rodents.
  • [MeSH-major] Genome / genetics. Guinea Pigs / genetics. Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Base Sequence. Cloning, Molecular. Phylogeny. Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Sequence Analysis, DNA. Sequence Homology, Nucleic Acid

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  • (PMID = 19232383.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0038
  • [Journal-full-title] Gene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Gene
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM62828-01A1; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R15 GM062828-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96371; NLM/ PMC2670544
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58. Nishizawa T, Aldrich CC, Sherman DH: Molecular analysis of the rebeccamycin L-amino acid oxidase from Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243. J Bacteriol; 2005 Mar;187(6):2084-92
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  • [Title] Molecular analysis of the rebeccamycin L-amino acid oxidase from Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243.
  • Rebeccamycin, a member of the tryptophan-derived indolocarbazole family, is produced by Lechevalieria aerocolonigenes ATCC 39243.
  • The biosynthetic pathway that specifies biosynthesis of this important metabolite is comprised of 11 genes spanning 18 kb of DNA.
  • A presumed early enzyme involved in elaboration of the rebeccamycin aglycone is encoded by rebO, located at the left-hand region of the reb gene cluster.
  • The deduced protein product, RebO (51.9 kDa), is an L-amino acid oxidase (L-AAO) that has 27% identity to an L-AAO from Scomber japonicus (animal, mackerel) and is a member of the family of FAD-dependent oxidase enzymes.
  • In order to study the biochemical properties of this key enzyme, the rebO gene was overexpressed and purified from Escherichia coli.
  • Biochemical characterization showed that RebO is dimeric, with a molecular mass of approximately 101 kDa.
  • Further analysis revealed that the enzyme contains a noncovalently bound FAD cofactor and is reoxidized at the expense of molecular oxygen by producing one molecule of hydrogen peroxide.
  • Based on kinetic studies, RebO shows significant preference for 7-chloro-L-tryptophan, suggesting its likely role as the natural early pathway substrate.
  • Furthermore, the native RebO enzyme has evident, albeit limited, flexibility as shown by bioconversion studies with unnatural substrates.
  • This work provides the first analysis of a structural enzyme involved in construction of this important class of indolocarbazole natural products.
  • [MeSH-major] Actinomycetales / enzymology. Actinomycetales / genetics. Amino Acid Oxidoreductases / genetics. Amino Acid Oxidoreductases / metabolism. Carbazoles / metabolism. Indoles / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial. Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic. L-Amino Acid Oxidase. Molecular Biology. Phylogeny. Substrate Specificity. Tryptophan / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 15743957.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9193
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of bacteriology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Bacteriol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U01 AI48521
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Carbazoles; 0 / Indoles; 8DUH1N11BX / Tryptophan; 93908-02-2 / rebeccamycin; EC 1.4.- / Amino Acid Oxidoreductases; EC 1.4.3.2 / L-Amino Acid Oxidase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1064027
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59. Schloss PD, Westcott SL, Ryabin T, Hall JR, Hartmann M, Hollister EB, Lesniewski RA, Oakley BB, Parks DH, Robinson CJ, Sahl JW, Stres B, Thallinger GG, Van Horn DJ, Weber CF: Introducing mothur: open-source, platform-independent, community-supported software for describing and comparing microbial communities. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2009 Dec;75(23):7537-41
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  • [Title] Introducing mothur: open-source, platform-independent, community-supported software for describing and comparing microbial communities.
  • mothur aims to be a comprehensive software package that allows users to use a single piece of software to analyze community sequence data.
  • It builds upon previous tools to provide a flexible and powerful software package for analyzing sequencing data.
  • As a case study, we used mothur to trim, screen, and align sequences; calculate distances; assign sequences to operational taxonomic units; and describe the alpha and beta diversity of eight marine samples previously characterized by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments.
  • This analysis of more than 222,000 sequences was completed in less than 2 h with a laptop computer.
  • [MeSH-major] Biodiversity. Computational Biology / methods. Metagenomics / methods. Software
  • [MeSH-minor] Environmental Microbiology. Sequence Analysis, DNA

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  • (PMID = 19801464.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2786419
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60. Nelson AJ, Worthley MI, Psaltis PJ, Carbone A, Dundon BK, Duncan RF, Piantadosi C, Lau DH, Sanders P, Wittert GA, Worthley SG: Validation of cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of pericardial adipose tissue volume. J Cardiovasc Magn Reson; 2009;11:15
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  • [Title] Validation of cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of pericardial adipose tissue volume.
  • BACKGROUND: Pericardial adipose tissue (PAT) has been shown to be an independent predictor of coronary artery disease.
  • To date its assessment has been restricted to the use of surrogate echocardiographic indices such as measurement of epicardial fat thickness over the right ventricular free wall, which have limitations.
  • Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) offers the potential to non-invasively assess total PAT, however like other imaging modalities, CMR has not yet been validated for this purpose.
  • Thus, we sought to describe a novel technique for assessing total PAT with validation in an ovine model.
  • METHODS: 11 merino sheep were studied.
  • A standard clinical series of ventricular short axis CMR images (1.5T Siemens Sonata) were obtained during mechanical ventilation breath-holds.
  • Beginning at the mitral annulus, consecutive end-diastolic ventricular images were used to determine the area and volume of epicardial, paracardial and pericardial adipose tissue.
  • In addition adipose thickness was measured at the right ventricular free wall.
  • Following euthanasia, the paracardial adipose tissue was removed from the ventricle and weighed to allow comparison with corresponding CMR measurements.
  • RESULTS: There was a strong correlation between CMR-derived paracardial adipose tissue volume and ex vivo paracardial mass (R2 = 0.89, p < 0.001).
  • In contrast, CMR measurements of corresponding RV free wall paracardial adipose thickness did not correlate with ex vivo paracardial mass (R2 = 0.003, p = 0.878).
  • CONCLUSION: In this ovine model, CMR-derived paracardial adipose tissue volume, but not the corresponding and conventional measure of paracardial adipose thickness over the RV free wall, accurately reflected paracardial adipose tissue mass.
  • This study validates for the first time, the use of clinically utilised CMR sequences for the accurate and reproducible assessment of pericardial adiposity.
  • Furthermore this non-invasive modality does not use ionising radiation and therefore is ideally suited for future studies of PAT and its role in cardiovascular risk prediction and disease in clinical practice.
  • [MeSH-major] Adipose Tissue / anatomy & histology. Adiposity. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Cine. Pericardium / anatomy & histology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted. Models, Animal. Organ Size. Predictive Value of Tests. Reproducibility of Results. Sheep

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  • (PMID = 19416534.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-429X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of cardiovascular magnetic resonance : official journal of the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Cardiovasc Magn Reson
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Validation Studies
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2684106
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61. Hashish M, Raghavan S, Somara S, Gilmont RR, Miyasaka E, Bitar KN, Teitelbaum DH: Surgical implantation of a bioengineered internal anal sphincter. J Pediatr Surg; 2010 Jan;45(1):52-8
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  • [Title] Surgical implantation of a bioengineered internal anal sphincter.
  • PURPOSE: Fecal incontinence is a common disorder that can have devastating social and psychologic consequences.
  • However, there are no long-term ideal solutions for such patients.
  • Although loss of continence is multifactorial, the integrity of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) has particular significance.
  • We previously described the development of 3-dimensional bioengineered constructs using isolated smooth muscle tissue from donor C57BL/6 IAS.
  • We hypothesized that the bioengineered ring constructs would retain cellular viability and promote neovascularization upon implantation into a recipient mouse.
  • METHODS: Internal anal sphincter ring constructs were surgically implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and treated with either fibroblastic growth factor 2 (0.26 microg daily) or saline controls using a microosmotic pump.
  • Internal anal sphincter constructs were harvested after 25 days (range, 23-26 days) and assessed morphologically and for tissue viability.
  • RESULT: Gross morphology showed that there was no rejection.
  • Rings showed muscle attachment to the back of the mouse with no sign of inflammation.
  • Fibroblastic growth factor 2 infusion resulted in a significantly improved histologic score and muscle viability compared with the control group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional bioengineered IAS rings can be successfully implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of recipient mice.
  • The addition of fibroblastic growth factor 2 led to improved muscle viability, vascularity, and survival.
  • This approach may become a feasible option for patients with fecal incontinence.
  • [MeSH-major] Anal Canal / surgery. Prosthesis Implantation / methods. Tissue Engineering / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomedical Engineering. Cells, Cultured. Disease Models, Animal. Fecal Incontinence / surgery. Female. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 / therapeutic use. Humans. Manometry. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Muscle, Smooth / cytology. Muscle, Smooth / surgery. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / physiology. Prosthesis Design. Tissue Culture Techniques

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20105579.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 2R01DK042876; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5 P03 CA46592; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 5R01DK071614; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK071614; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK071614-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 103107-01-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS255019; NLM/ PMC3018766
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62. Solomon DH, Glynn RJ, Rothman KJ, Schneeweiss S, Setoguchi S, Mogun H, Avorn J, Stürmer T: Subgroup analyses to determine cardiovascular risk associated with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs and coxibs in specific patient groups. Arthritis Rheum; 2008 Aug 15;59(8):1097-104
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  • We calculated the relative risk (RR) for CVD events (myocardial infarction [MI], stroke, congestive heart failure, and cardiovascular death) among users of coxibs or nonselective NSAIDs in the prior 6 months compared with nonusers.
  • Several patient characteristics were found to increase the risk of CVD events among users of some agents in both the primary and secondary cohorts, including age >/=80 years, hypertension, prior MI, prior CVD, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic renal disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

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  • (PMID = 18668605.001).
  • [ISSN] 0004-3591
  • [Journal-full-title] Arthritis and rheumatism
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arthritis Rheum.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR 48264; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR 48616; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA 15507; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / K23 AR048616; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / K23 AR048616-05; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / K24 AR055989; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA015507; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA015507-03; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R55 AR048264; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R55 AR048264-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; 0 / Antirheumatic Agents; 0 / Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS205082; NLM/ PMC2884183
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63. Craig DH, Shiratsuchi H, Basson MD: Increased extracellular pressure provides a novel adjuvant stimulus for enhancement of conventional dendritic cell maturation strategies. Biochem Biophys Res Commun; 2009 Sep 11;387(1):174-9
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  • [Title] Increased extracellular pressure provides a novel adjuvant stimulus for enhancement of conventional dendritic cell maturation strategies.
  • Dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccine strategies have gained increasing popularity in recent years.
  • Methods for ex vivo generation of immunocompetent mature DCs still require optimization.
  • DCs have been shown to phenotypically mature under elevated pressure.
  • We compared the effects of pressure on DC maturation with LPS- and cytokine-stimulation.
  • Human monocyte-derived immature or LPS- and cytokine-matured DCs were exposed to ambient or 40 mmHg increased pressure for 12h, then assessed for expression of CD80, CD86, CD40, MHC-I/II, and inflammatory cytokine production.
  • DCs were also evaluated for capacity to stimulate T-cell proliferation by co-culture with allogeneic lymphocytes.
  • Pressure significantly increased cytokine production and expression of all surface molecules on immature DC other than MHC-I and CD40.
  • Pressure/LPS-treated DCs displayed further upregulation of MHC-I, CD40, and IL-12p70.
  • Cytokine-matured DCs appeared less responsive to pressure.
  • T-cell proliferation correlated with MHC expression.
  • Results suggest mechanical stimulation of DCs may provide a useful adjuvant to TLR-agonist maturation strategies.
  • [MeSH-major] Adjuvants, Immunologic / pharmacology. Dendritic Cells / drug effects. Mechanotransduction, Cellular. T-Lymphocytes / immunology
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD40 / immunology. Antigens, CD80 / immunology. Antigens, CD86 / immunology. Cells, Cultured. Cytokines / biosynthesis. Histocompatibility Antigens Class I / immunology. Histocompatibility Antigens Class II / immunology. Humans. Lipopolysaccharides / immunology. Pressure

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  • (PMID = 19580785.001).
  • [ISSN] 1090-2104
  • [Journal-full-title] Biochemical and biophysical research communications
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK 60771; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adjuvants, Immunologic; 0 / Antigens, CD40; 0 / Antigens, CD80; 0 / Antigens, CD86; 0 / Cytokines; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class I; 0 / Histocompatibility Antigens Class II; 0 / Lipopolysaccharides
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS130268; NLM/ PMC3837574
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64. Zhong B, Wang DH: N-oleoyldopamine, a novel endogenous capsaicin-like lipid, protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury via activation of TRPV1. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol; 2008 Aug;295(2):H728-35
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  • [Title] N-oleoyldopamine, a novel endogenous capsaicin-like lipid, protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury via activation of TRPV1.
  • N-oleoyldopamine (OLDA), a bioactive lipid originally found in the mammalian brain, is an endovanilloid that selectively activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel.
  • This study tests the hypothesis that OLDA protects the heart against ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury via activation of the TRPV1 in wild-type (WT) but not in gene-targeted TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1(-/-)) mice.
  • Hearts of WT or TRPV1(-/-) mice were Langendorffly perfused with OLDA (2 x 10(-9) M) in the presence or absence of CGRP8-37 (1 x 10(-6) M), a selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist; RP-67580 (1 x 10(-6) M), a selective neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist; chelerythrine (5 x 10(-6) M), a selective protein kinase C (PKC) antagonist; or tetrabutylammonium (TBA, 5 x 10(-4) M), a nonselective K(+) channel antagonist, followed by 35 min of global ischemia and 40 min of reperfusion (I/R).
  • Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), coronary flow (CF), and left ventricular peak positive dP/dt (+dP/dt) were evaluated after I/R.
  • OLDA improved recovery of cardiac function after I/R in WT but not TRPV1(-/-) hearts by increasing LVDP, CF, and +dP/dt and by decreasing LVEDP.
  • CGRP8-37, RP-67580, chelerythrine, or TBA abolished the protective effect of OLDA in WT hearts.
  • Radioimmunoassay showed that the release of substance P (SP) and CGRP after OLDA treatment was higher in WT than in TRPV1(-/-) hearts, which was blocked by chelerythrine or TBA.
  • Thus OLDA exerts a cardiac protective effect during I/R injury in WT hearts via CGRP and SP release, which is abolished by PKC or K(+) channel antagonists.
  • The protective effect of OLDA is void in TRPV1(-/-) hearts, supporting the notion that TRPV1 mediates OLDA-induced protection against cardiac I/R injury.
  • [MeSH-major] Dopamine / analogs & derivatives. Myocardial Ischemia / metabolism. Myocardial Reperfusion Injury / prevention & control. Myocardium / metabolism. TRPV Cation Channels / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Benzophenanthridines / pharmacology. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / metabolism. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / pharmacology. Coronary Circulation. Isoindoles / pharmacology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Mice, Knockout. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists. Peptide Fragments / pharmacology. Potassium Channel Blockers / pharmacology. Potassium Channels / metabolism. Protein Kinase C / antagonists & inhibitors. Protein Kinase C / metabolism. Protein Kinase Inhibitors / pharmacology. Quaternary Ammonium Compounds / pharmacology. Radioimmunoassay. Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / antagonists & inhibitors. Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / metabolism. Receptors, Neurokinin-1 / metabolism. Substance P / metabolism. Ventricular Function, Left. Ventricular Pressure

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  • (PMID = 18567714.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzophenanthridines; 0 / Isoindoles; 0 / N-oleoyldopamine; 0 / Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Potassium Channel Blockers; 0 / Potassium Channels; 0 / Protein Kinase Inhibitors; 0 / Quaternary Ammonium Compounds; 0 / Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; 0 / Receptors, Neurokinin-1; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / TRPV1 protein, mouse; 119911-68-1 / calcitonin gene-related peptide (8-37); 135911-02-3 / 7,7-diphenyl-2-(1-imino-2-(2-methoxyphenyl)ethyl)perhydroisoindol-4-one; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; 83652-28-2 / Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; CBU2X6BBJR / tetrabutylammonium; E3B045W6X0 / chelerythrine; EC 2.7.11.13 / Protein Kinase C; VTD58H1Z2X / Dopamine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2519207
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65. Houlihan LM, Christoforou A, Arbuckle MI, Torrance HS, Anderson SM, Muir WJ, Porteous DJ, Blackwood DH, Evans KL: A case-control association study and family-based expression analysis of the bipolar disorder candidate gene PI4K2B. J Psychiatr Res; 2009 Dec;43(16):1272-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A case-control association study and family-based expression analysis of the bipolar disorder candidate gene PI4K2B.
  • Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and recurrent major depression are complex psychiatric illnesses with a substantial, yet unknown genetic component.
  • Linkage of bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression with markers on chromosome 4p15-p16 has been identified in a large Scottish family and three smaller families.
  • Analysis of haplotypes in the four chromosome 4p-linked families, identified two regions, each shared by three of the four families, which are also supported by a case-control association study.
  • The candidate gene phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type-II beta (PI4K2B) lies within one of these regions.
  • PI4K2B is a strong functional candidate as it is a member of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, which is targeted by lithium for therapeutic effect in bipolar disorder.
  • Two approaches were undertaken to test the PI4K2B candidate gene as a susceptibility factor for psychiatric illness.
  • First, a case-control association study, using tagging SNPs from the PI4K2B genomic region, in bipolar disorder (n=368), schizophrenia (n=386) and controls (n=458) showed association with a two-marker haplotype in schizophrenia but not bipolar disorder (rs10939038 and rs17408391, global P=0.005, permuted global P=0.039).
  • Second, expression studies at the allele-specific mRNA and protein level using lymphoblastoid cell lines from members of the large Scottish family, which showed linkage to 4p15-p16 in bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression, showed no difference in expression differences between affected and non-affected family members.
  • There is no evidence to suggest that PI4K2B is contributing to bipolar disorder in this family but a role for this gene in schizophrenia has not been excluded.
  • [MeSH-major] Bipolar Disorder / genetics. Family Health. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor) / genetics. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Female. Gene Frequency. Genome-Wide Association Study / methods. Genotype. Humans. Male. Schizophrenia / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19539307.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1379
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of psychiatric research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Psychiatr Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor); EC 2.7.1.67 / phosphatidylinositol phosphate 4-kinase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2789249
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66. Wang Y, Babánková D, Huang J, Swain GM, Wang DH: Deletion of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors exaggerates renal damage in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. Hypertension; 2008 Aug;52(2):264-70
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  • [Title] Deletion of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors exaggerates renal damage in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension.
  • To determine whether the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel provides protection against hypertension-induced renal damage, hypertension was induced by uninephrectomy and by giving deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1-/-) mice.
  • Mean arterial pressure, as determined by radiotelemetry, increased significantly and reached the peak 7 days after DOCA-salt treatment in both WT and TRPV1-/- mice.
  • There was no difference in mean arterial pressure between the 2 strains at the baseline or at the peak that lasted for 4 treatment weeks.
  • DOCA-salt treatment in both WT and TRPV1-/- mice led to increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane, glomerulosclerosis, renal cortical tubulointerstitial injury, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, increased number of tubular proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells, and renal monocyte/macrophage infiltration, all of which were much more severe in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1-/- compared with DOCA-salt-treated WT mice.
  • Renal TRPV1 protein expression, but not the renal anandamide content, was elevated in DOCA-salt-treated WT compared with vehicle-treated WT mice.
  • Renal anandamide levels were markedly elevated in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1-/- but not in vehicle-treated TRPV1-/- mice.
  • Thus, our data show that ablation of the TRPV1 gene exacerbates renal damage induced by DOCA-salt hypertension, indicating that TRPV1 may constitute a protective mechanism against end-organ damage induced by hypertension.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension / complications. Hypertension / physiopathology. Nephrosclerosis / etiology. Nephrosclerosis / pathology. TRPV Cation Channels / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Albuminuria / diagnosis. Albuminuria / etiology. Analysis of Variance. Animals. Blotting, Western. Desoxycorticosterone. Disease Models, Animal. Glomerular Filtration Rate. Immunohistochemistry. Isoprostanes / urine. Mice. Mice, Mutant Strains. Probability. Random Allocation. Urinalysis

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  • (PMID = 18606907.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoprostanes; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / TRPV1 protein, human; 0 / vanilloid receptor subtype 1; 40GP35YQ49 / Desoxycorticosterone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96825; NLM/ PMC2669743
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67. Hashish MS, Dawoud HH, Hirschl RB, Bruch SW, El Batarny AM, Mychaliska GB, Drongowski RA, Ehrlich PF, Hassaballa SZ, El-Dosuky NI, Teitelbaum DH: Long-term functional outcome and quality of life in patients with high imperforate anus. J Pediatr Surg; 2010 Jan;45(1):224-30
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Long-term functional outcome and quality of life in patients with high imperforate anus.
  • PURPOSE: Anorectal malformations (ARMs) are associated with a large number of functional sequale that may affect a child's long-term quality of life (QOL).
  • The purposes of this study were to better quantify patient functional stooling outcome and to identify how these outcomes related to the QOL in patients with high imperforate anus.
  • METHODS: Forty-eight patients from 2 children's hospitals underwent scoring of stooling after 4 years of life.
  • Scoring consisted of a 13-item questionnaire to assess long-term stooling habits (score range: 0-30, worst to best).
  • These results were then correlated with a QOL survey as judged by a parent or guardian.
  • RESULT: Mean (SD) age at survey was 6.5 (1.6) years.
  • Comparison of QOL and clinical scoring showed no signficant difference between the 2 institutions (P > .05).
  • There was a direct correlation between the QOL and stooling score (Pearson r(2) = 0.827; beta coefficient = 24.7, P < .001).
  • Interestingly, functional stooling scores worsened with increasing age (Pearson r(2) = 0.318, P = .02).
  • Patients with associated congenital anomalies had a high rate of poor QOL (44% in poor range; P = .001).
  • Stooling scores decreased significantly with increasing severity/complexity of the ARM (P = .001).
  • CONCLUSION: A large number of children experience functional stooling problems, and these were directly associated with poor QOL.
  • In contrast to previous perceptions, our study showed that stooling patterns are perceived to worsen with age.
  • This suggests that children with ARMs need long-term follow-up and counseling.
  • [MeSH-major] Anus, Imperforate / psychology. Anus, Imperforate / surgery. Defecation / physiology. Quality of Life
  • [MeSH-minor] Abnormalities, Multiple / epidemiology. Age Factors. Anal Canal / surgery. Child. Constipation / epidemiology. Constipation / psychology. Constipation / surgery. Cross-Cultural Comparison. Digestive System Surgical Procedures / methods. Egypt / epidemiology. Enema / methods. Humans. Laparoscopy / methods. Longitudinal Studies. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Patient Satisfaction. Reoperation. Severity of Illness Index. Surveys and Questionnaires. Treatment Outcome. United States / epidemiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20105608.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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68. Li S, Anzai Y, Kinoshita K, Kato F, Sherman DH: Functional analysis of MycE and MycF, two O-methyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of mycinamicin macrolide antibiotics. Chembiochem; 2009 May 25;10(8):1297-301
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  • [Title] Functional analysis of MycE and MycF, two O-methyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of mycinamicin macrolide antibiotics.
  • Mg motors: We characterized the in vitro function of MycE and MycF, two O-methyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of mycinamicin antibiotics.
  • Each enzyme was confirmed to be an S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent deoxysugar methyltransferase.
  • Their optimal activities require the presence of Mg(2+).
  • With the reconstituted in vitro assays, the order of mycinamicin VI-->III-->IV in the post-PKS (polyketide synthase) tailoring pathway of mycinamicin was unambiguously determined.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / biosynthesis. Macrolides / chemistry. Protein O-Methyltransferase / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Kinetics. Magnesium / metabolism. Methyltransferases / metabolism. Molecular Sequence Data. Multigene Family. Phylogeny. Polyketide Synthases / metabolism. Sequence Homology, Amino Acid

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  • (PMID = 19415708.001).
  • [ISSN] 1439-7633
  • [Journal-full-title] Chembiochem : a European journal of chemical biology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Chembiochem
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM78553; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM078553; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM078553-03
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Macrolides; 0 / mycinamicins; 79956-01-7 / Polyketide Synthases; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases; EC 2.1.1.- / Protein O-Methyltransferase; EC 2.1.1.- / S-adenosyl-L-methionine (R,S)-reticuline 7-O-methyltransferase; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS181989; NLM/ PMC2861363
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69. Slottow TL, Steinberg DH, Roy P, Javaid A, Buch AN, Okabe T, Xue Z, Smith K, Torguson R, Pichard AD, Satler LF, Suddath WO, Kent KM, Waksman R: Drug-eluting stents are associated with similar cardiovascular outcomes when compared to bare metal stents in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Cardiovasc Revasc Med; 2008 Jan-Mar;9(1):24-8
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  • At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 13.3% in the BMS group and 9.2% in the DES group [P=not significant (ns)], recurrent MI was 5.3% in the BMS group vs. 4.4% in the DES group (P=ns), and TVR was 7% in the BMS group vs. 8.7% in the DES group (P=ns).

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  • (PMID = 18206634.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-0938
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiovascular revascularization medicine : including molecular interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiovasc Revasc Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiovascular Agents; 0 / Metals; 0 / Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; P88XT4IS4D / Paclitaxel; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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70. Carp J, Kim K, Taylor SF, Fitzgerald KD, Weissman DH: Conditional Differences in Mean Reaction Time Explain Effects of Response Congruency, but not Accuracy, on Posterior Medial Frontal Cortex Activity. Front Hum Neurosci; 2010;4:231
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Conditional Differences in Mean Reaction Time Explain Effects of Response Congruency, but not Accuracy, on Posterior Medial Frontal Cortex Activity.
  • According to the conflict-monitoring model of cognitive control, the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) plays an important role in detecting conflict between competing motor responses.
  • Consistent with this view, pMFC activity is greater in high-conflict trials (e.g., incongruent trials and errors) than in low-conflict trials (e.g., congruent trials and correct responses) of distractor interference tasks.
  • However, in both low- and high-conflict trials, pMFC activity increases linearly with reaction time (RT).
  • Thus, heightened pMFC activity in high-conflict trials may simply reflect the fact that mean RT is longer in high-conflict than in low-conflict trials.
  • To investigate this hypothesis, we reanalyzed data from a previously published fMRI study in which participants performed an event-related version of the multi-source interference task.
  • Critically, after controlling for conditional differences in mean RT, effects of response congruency on pMFC activity were eliminated; in contrast, effects of response accuracy on pMFC activity remained robust.
  • These findings indicate that effects of response congruency on pMFC activity may index any of several processes whose recruitment increases with time on task (e.g., sustained attention).
  • However, effects of response accuracy reflect processes unique to error trials.
  • We conclude that effects of response accuracy on pMFC activity provide stronger support for the conflict-monitoring model than effects of response congruency.

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  • (PMID = 21212836.001).
  • [ISSN] 1662-5161
  • [Journal-full-title] Frontiers in human neuroscience
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Front Hum Neurosci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3014651
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; brain–behavior correlation / conflict monitoring / error monitoring / fMRI / reaction time
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71. Orr JM, Weissman DH: Anterior cingulate cortex makes 2 contributions to minimizing distraction. Cereb Cortex; 2009 Mar;19(3):703-11
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  • [Title] Anterior cingulate cortex makes 2 contributions to minimizing distraction.
  • When we detect conflicting irrelevant stimuli (e.g., nearby conversations), we often minimize distraction by increasing attention to relevant stimuli.
  • However, dissociating the neural substrates of processes that detect conflict and processes that increase attention has proven exceptionally difficult.
  • Using a novel cross-modal attentional cueing task in humans, we observed regional specialization for these processes in the cognitive division of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC(cd)).
  • Activity in a dorsal subregion was associated with increasing attention to relevant stimuli, correlated with behavioral measures of orienting attention to those stimuli, and resembled activity in dorsolateral prefrontal regions that are also thought to bias attention toward relevant stimuli.
  • In contrast, activity in a rostral subregion was associated only with detecting response conflict caused by irrelevant stimuli.
  • These findings support a 2-component model for minimizing distraction and speak to a longstanding debate over how the ACC(cd) contributes to cognitive control.
  • [MeSH-major] Attention / physiology. Cognition / physiology. Conflict (Psychology). Gyrus Cinguli / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Models, Neurological. Photic Stimulation / methods. Young Adult

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