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1. |||||..... 50%  Richardson-Burns SM, Hendricks JL, Foster B, Povlich LK, Kim DH, Martin DC: Polymerization of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) around living neural cells. Biomaterials; 2007 Mar;28(8):1539-52
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  • [Title] Polymerization of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) around living neural cells.
  • In this paper, we describe interactions between neural cells and the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) toward development of electrically conductive biomaterials intended for direct, functional contact with electrically active tissues such as the nervous system, heart, and skeletal muscle.
  • We introduce a process for polymerizing PEDOT around living cells and describe a neural cell-templated conducting polymer coating for microelectrodes and a hybrid conducting polymer-live neural cell electrode.
  • We found that neural cells could be exposed to working concentrations (0.01 m) of the EDOT monomer for as long as 72 h while maintaining 80% cell viability.
  • PEDOT could be electrochemically deposited around neurons cultured on electrodes using 0.5-1 microA/mm(2) galvanostatic current.
  • PEDOT polymerized on the electrode and surrounded the cells, covering cell processes.
  • The polymerization was impeded in regions where cells were well adhered to the substrate.
  • The cells could be removed from the PEDOT matrix to generate a neural cell-templated biomimetic conductive substrate with cell-shaped features that were cell attracting.
  • Live cells embedded within the conductive polymer matrix remained viable for at least 120 h following polymerization.
  • Dying cells primarily underwent apoptotic cell death.
  • PEDOT, PEDOT+live neurons, and neuron-templated PEDOT coatings on electrodes significantly enhanced the electrical properties as compared to the bare electrode as indicated by decreased electrical impedance of 1-1.5 orders of magnitude at 0.01-1 kHz and significantly increased charge transfer capacity.
  • PEDOT coatings showed a decrease of the phase angle of the impedance from roughly 80 degrees for the bare electrode to 5-35 degrees at frequencies >0.1 kHz.
  • Equivalent circuit modeling indicated that PEDOT-coated electrodes were best described by R(C(RT)) circuit.
  • We found that an RC parallel circuit must be added to the model for PEDOT+live neuron and neuron-templated PEDOT coatings.
  • [MeSH-major] Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic / chemical synthesis. Biocompatible Materials / chemical synthesis. Neurons. Polymers / chemical synthesis
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line, Tumor. Mice

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  • (PMID = 17169420.001).
  • [ISSN] 0142-9612
  • [Journal-full-title] Biomaterials
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Biomaterials
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / F32 NS054618-01; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / N01-NS-1-2338; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / T90-DK070071-02
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bicyclo Compounds, Heterocyclic; 0 / Biocompatible Materials; 0 / Polymers; 0 / poly(3,4-ethylene dioxythiophene)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS16763; NLM/ PMC1941689
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2. |||||..... 49%  Yang H, Gumucio DL, Teitelbaum DH: Intestinal specific overexpression of interleukin-7 attenuates the alternation of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes after total parenteral nutrition administration. Ann Surg; 2008 Nov;248(5):849-56
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  • [Title] Intestinal specific overexpression of interleukin-7 attenuates the alternation of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes after total parenteral nutrition administration.
  • OBJECTIVE: Total parenteral nutrition (TPN), with the complete removal of enteral nutrition, results in marked changes in intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte (IEL) function and phenotype.
  • Previous work shows that TPN results in a loss of intestinal epithelial cell-derived interleukin-7 (IL-7), and this loss may play an important role in development of such TPN-associated IEL changes.
  • METHODS: To further understand this relation, we generated a transgenic mouse (IL-7), which overexpresses IL-7 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells.
  • We hypothesized that this localized overexpression would attenuate many of the observed TPN-associated IEL changes.
  • RESULTS: Our study showed that TPN administration led to significant changes in IEL phenotype, including a marked decline in the CD8alphabeta+, CD4+, and alphabeta-TCR+ populations.
  • IEL basal proliferation decreased 1.7-fold compared with wild-type TPN mice.
  • TPN administration in wild-type mice resulted in several changes in IEL-derived cytokine expression.
  • IL-7 mice given TPN, however, maintained IEL proliferation, and sustained normal IEL numbers and phenotype.
  • CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that specific intestinal IL-7 overexpression significantly attenuated many IEL changes in phenotype and function after TPN administration.
  • These findings suggest a mechanism by which TPN results in observed IEL changes.
  • [MeSH-major] Interleukin-7 / metabolism. Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism. Intestine, Small / metabolism. Lymphocytes / cytology. Parenteral Nutrition, Total
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Antigens, CD44 / metabolism. Blotting, Western. Epithelial Cells / cytology. Epithelial Cells / immunology. Flow Cytometry. Mice. Mice, Transgenic. Models, Animal

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  • (PMID = 18948814.001).
  • [ISSN] 1528-1140
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 2R01-AI044076-09; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-08; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-09; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antigens, CD44; 0 / Interleukin-7
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS63923; NLM/ PMC2597497
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3. |||||..... 47%  Pfleger BF, Kim Y, Nusca TD, Maltseva N, Lee JY, Rath CM, Scaglione JB, Janes BK, Anderson EC, Bergman NH, Hanna PC, Joachimiak A, Sherman DH: Structural and functional analysis of AsbF: origin of the stealth 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid subunit for petrobactin biosynthesis. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2008 Nov 4;105(44):17133-8
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  • [Title] Structural and functional analysis of AsbF: origin of the stealth 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid subunit for petrobactin biosynthesis.
  • Petrobactin, a virulence-associated siderophore produced by Bacillus anthracis, chelates ferric iron through the rare 3,4-isomer of dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-DHBA).
  • Most catechol siderophores, including bacillibactin and enterobactin, use 2,3-DHBA as a biosynthetic subunit.
  • Significantly, siderocalin, a factor involved in human innate immunity, sequesters ferric siderophores bearing the more typical 2,3-DHBA moiety, thereby impeding uptake of iron by the pathogenic bacterial cell.
  • In contrast, the unusual 3,4-DHBA component of petrobactin renders the siderocalin system incapable of obstructing bacterial iron uptake.
  • Although recent genetic and biochemical studies have revealed selected early steps in petrobactin biosynthesis, the origin of 3,4-DHBA as well as the function of the protein encoded by the final gene in the B. anthracis siderophore biosynthetic (asb) operon, asbF (BA1986), has remained unclear.
  • In this study we demonstrate that 3,4-DHBA is produced through conversion of the common bacterial metabolite 3-dehydroshikimate (3-DHS) by AsbF-a 3-DHS dehydratase.
  • Elucidation of the cocrystal structure of AsbF with 3,4-DHBA, in conjunction with a series of biochemical studies, supports a mechanism in which an enolate intermediate is formed through the action of this 3-DHS dehydratase metalloenzyme.
  • Structural and functional parallels are evident between AsbF and other enzymes within the xylose isomerase TIM-barrel family.
  • Overall, these data indicate that microbial species shown to possess homologs of AsbF may, like B. anthracis, also rely on production of the unique 3,4-DHBA metabolite to achieve full viability in the environment or virulence within the host.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacterial Proteins / chemistry. Benzamides / metabolism. Hydro-Lyases / chemistry. Hydroxybenzoates / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bacillus anthracis / genetics. Bacillus anthracis / metabolism. Crystallography, X-Ray. Hydrogen-Ion Concentration. Mice. Models, Molecular. Operon. Protein Conformation. Shikimic Acid / analogs & derivatives. Shikimic Acid / chemistry. Shikimic Acid / metabolism. Structure-Activity Relationship

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  • (PMID = 18955706.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] PDB/ 3DX5
  • [Grant] United States / PHS HHS / / HHSN266200400059C; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01-AI-40059; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U54 AI057153; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U54 GM074942; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / U54 GM074942-04S2; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U54AI57153
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Hydroxybenzoates; 0 / petrobactin; 27655-56-7 / 3-dehydroshikimate; 29MS2WI2NU / Shikimic Acid; 99-50-3 / protocatechuic acid; EC 4.2.1.- / Hydro-Lyases; EC 4.2.1.10 / 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2579390
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4. |||||..... 46%  Gao F, Sui D, Garavito RM, Worden RM, Wang DH: Salt intake augments hypotensive effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4: functional significance and implication. Hypertension; 2009 Feb;53(2):228-35
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  • [Title] Salt intake augments hypotensive effects of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4: functional significance and implication.
  • To test the hypothesis that activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channel conveys a hypotensive effect that is enhanced during salt load, male Wistar rats fed a normal-sodium (0.5%) or high-sodium (HS; 4%) diet for 3 weeks were given 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (4 alpha-PDD), a specific TRPV4 activator, in the presence or absence of capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 blocker, ruthenium red, a TRPV4 blocker, or TRPV4 small hairpin RNA that selectively knockdowns TRPV4.
  • 4 alpha-PDD (1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg IV) dose-dependently decreased mean arterial pressure (P<0.05).
  • HS enhanced 4 alpha-PDD-induced depressor effects as well as 4 alpha-PDD-mediated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P (P<0.001).
  • Ruthenium red markedly blunted (P<0.001), whereas capsazepine slightly attenuated (P<0.05) 4 alpha-PDD-induced depressor effects in HS and normal-sodium diet rats.
  • Ruthenium red alone increased baseline mean arterial pressure in both HS and normal-sodium diet rats with a greater magnitude in the former (P<0.05).
  • Western blot analysis showed that HS increased TRPV4 expression in dorsal root ganglia and mesenteric arteries (P<0.05) but not the renal cortex and medulla.
  • Gene-silencing approach revealed that TRPV4 small hairpin RNA downregulated TRPV4 expression leading to blunted 4 alpha-PDD-induced hypotension (P<0.05).
  • Thus, TRPV4 activation decreases blood pressure in rats given a normal-sodium diet.
  • HS enhances TRPV4 expression in sensory nerves/mesenteric arteries and TRPV4-mediated depressor effects and calcitonin gene-related peptide/substance P release such that HS causes a greater increase in blood pressure when TRPV4 is blocked.
  • Our data indicate that TRPV4 activation may constitute a compensatory mechanism in preventing salt-induced increases in blood pressure.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Pressure / drug effects. Hypertension / prevention & control. Hypotension / physiopathology. Sodium Chloride, Dietary / pharmacology. TRPV Cation Channels / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / metabolism. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Disease Models, Animal. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Ganglia, Spinal / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism. Male. Mesenteric Arteries / metabolism. Phorbol Esters / pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Ruthenium Red / pharmacology. Salt-Tolerance / physiology. Substance P / metabolism

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  • [CommentIn] Hypertension. 2009 Feb;53(2):118-9 [19075088.001]
  • (PMID = 19075100.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Phorbol Esters; 0 / Sodium Chloride, Dietary; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / Trpv1 protein, rat; 0 / Trpv4 protein, rat; 11103-72-3 / Ruthenium Red; 24928-17-4 / phorbol-12,13-didecanoate; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; 83652-28-2 / Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; LFW48MY844 / capsazepine; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96829; NLM/ PMC2729143
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5. ||||...... 42%  Yan AT, Yan RT, Tan M, Senaratne M, Fitchett DH, Langer A, Goodman SG, INTERACT Investigators: Long-term prognostic value and therapeutic implications of continuous ST-segment monitoring in acute coronary syndrome. Am Heart J; 2007 Apr;153(4):500-6
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  • After a median follow-up of 30 months, patients with ST-segment shifts had a higher risk of death (17.7% vs 5.8%, log-rank P < .001) and death or myocardial infarction (MI) (24.6% vs 11.1%, log-rank P < .001).
  • In multivariable analysis adjusting for GRACE risk score, the presence of ST-segment shifts remained an independent predictor of death (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.37, 95% CI 1.38-4.09, P = .002) and death/MI (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% CI 1.25-3.00, P = .003).
  • Inhospital revascularization was independently associated with a lower risk of death/MI among patients with ST-segment shifts but not among those without (P for interaction = .02).

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  • (PMID = 17383285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6744
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. |||||..... 46%  Kaski JC, Consuegra-Sanchez L, Fernandez-Berges DJ, Cruz-Fernandez JM, Garcia-Moll X, Marrugat J, Mostaza J, Toro-Cebada R, González-Juanatey JR, Guzmán-Martínez G, SIESTA Investigators: Elevated serum neopterin levels and adverse cardiac events at 6 months follow-up in Mediterranean patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Atherosclerosis; 2008 Nov;201(1):176-83
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  • We sought to assess whether plasma neopterin levels predict adverse clinical outcomes in Mediterranean patients with non-ST elevation (NSTE) ACS, i.e. unstable angina (UA) and NSTE myocardial infarction (MI).

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  • (PMID = 18336825.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1484
  • [Journal-full-title] Atherosclerosis
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Atherosclerosis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Ireland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biological Markers; 670-65-5 / Neopterin; 9007-41-4 / C-Reactive Protein
  • [Investigator] Fernández MC; López García-Aranda V; Cabrera R; García de la Borbolla M; Toro R; Sancho Jaldón M; Fernández-Bergés D; Zaro MJ; Alzugaray R; Veiga M; Cordoba A; González-Juanatey JR; Grigorian L; Bassante P; Martín Jadraque L; Guzmán Martínez G; Martín Luengo C; Sánchez PL; Moriñigo JL; Castro Beiras A; Mosquera I; Montes Orbe PM; Eguía Astobiza I; García-Moll X; Martí MM; Barriales Alvarez V; Lee Hwang DH; Carrasco Sánchez FJ; Tobaruela A; Santos JM; Delgado S; Santos C; Villaroel MT; Capdevila A; Limiñana C; Castillo Domínguez JC; Sotillo Martí J; Dallí E; Martinez ML; Moreno MT; Castillo Lueña E; López-Bescós L; Jiménez J; Vallés Belsúe F; López Granados A; Diago Torrent JL; Marcos Gómez G; Sogorb Garrí F; Payá Mora E; Valls A; Muñoz Aguilera R; Serrano Sanz JA; Pascual Hernández D; García Robles JA; Pérez de Juan Romero M; Mostaza J; Lahoz C
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7. ||||...... 42%  Li YN, Zou DH, Gu M, Mi YC, Wang JX, Qiu LG: [The role of BCR/ABL isoforms in the presentations and outcome of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients]. Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi; 2009 Jun;48(6):481-4
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  • [Title] [The role of BCR/ABL isoforms in the presentations and outcome of Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adult patients].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the difference of clinical characteristics and outcomes between different isoforms of BCR/ABL in adults with Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
  • METHODS: The data of 106 adults with Ph+ ALL diagnosed in our hospital from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2007 were reviewed.
  • The difference of clinical characteristics between different subgroups of BCR/ABL was compared and their relation with outcomes was studied.
  • RESULTS: The median age of the 106 patients was 34 years and the median white blood cell count at baseline was 28.5 x 10(9)/L.
  • Comparative analysis demonstrated that patients in p210 group had an older age, higher blood platelet count (BPC) and more frequent occurrence of splenomegaly.
  • Referring to the outcomes, the complete remission (CR) rate of the two groups were 92.2% and 93.9%, respectively.
  • The median overall survival (OS) and relapse free survival (RFS) in p190 group were 13 months and 10 months, the 1, 3-year estimated OS were (54.7 +/- 6.7)% and (5.5 +/- 5.2)%, and the 1, 3-year estimated RFS were (40.2 +/- 6.8)% and (7.8 +/- 6.7)%, while in p210 group, the median OS and RFS were 15 months and 10 months, respectively, the 1, 3-year estimated OS were (65.8 +/- 8.9)% and (14.5 +/- 7.4)%, and the 1, 3-year estimated RFS were (48.3 +/- 9.4)% and (12.9 +/- 7.7)%.
  • All of the above data had no statistic significance between the two groups.
  • CONCLUSION: Majority of the adults with Ph+ ALL is p190 positive and patients with p210 have older age, higher BPC and more frequent occurrence of splenomegaly, while there is no significant difference between p190 group and p210 group in CR rate, RFS and OS.
  • [MeSH-major] Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl / genetics. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / diagnosis. Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Philadelphia Chromosome. Prognosis. Protein Isoforms / genetics. Retrospective Studies. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19954044.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1426
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua nei ke za zhi
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Protein Isoforms; 0 / abl-bcr fusion protein, human; EC 2.7.10.2 / Fusion Proteins, bcr-abl
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8. ||||...... 43%  Huang W, Rubinstein J, Prieto AR, Thang LV, Wang DH: Transient receptor potential vanilloid gene deletion exacerbates inflammation and atypical cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction. Hypertension; 2009 Feb;53(2):243-50
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  • The transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) channels expressed in sensory afferent fibers innervating the heart may be activated by protons or endovanilloids released during myocardial ischemia (MI), leading to angina.
  • The infarct size was greater in TRPV1(-/-) than in WT mice (P<0.001) 3 days after MI, and the mortality rate was higher in TRPV1(-/-) than in WT mice (P<0.05) 7 days after MI.
  • The levels of plasma cardiac troponin I; cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6; chemokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage inflammatory protein-2; and infiltration of inflammatory cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, and myofibroblasts; as well as collagen contents, were greater in TRPV1(-/-) than in WT mice (P<0.05) in the infarct area on days 3 and 7 after MI.
  • These data show that TRPV1 gene deletion results in excessive inflammation, disproportional left ventricular remodeling, and deteriorated cardiac function after MI, indicating that TRPV1 may prevent infarct expansion and cardiac injury by inhibiting inflammation and abnormal tissue remodeling.

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  • (PMID = 19114647.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Interleukin-1beta; 0 / Interleukin-6; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / TRPV1 protein, mouse; 0 / Troponin I; 0 / Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha; 9007-34-5 / Collagen
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96833; NLM/ PMC2669745
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9. ||||...... 42%  Steinberg DH, Pinto Slottow TL, Buch AN, Javaid A, Roy PK, Garg S, Okabe T, Torguson R, Smith KA, Xue Z, Suddath WO, Kent KM, Satler LF, Pichard AD, Lindsay J, Waksman R: Impact of in-stent restenosis on death and myocardial infarction. Am J Cardiol; 2007 Oct 1;100(7):1109-13
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  • Major adverse cardiac events, including mortality and myocardial infarction (MI), were assessed at clinical presentation, 30 days, and 6 months.
  • Patients with acute presentation (i.e., unstable angina requiring hospitalization or MI) were compared with patients with stable presentation.
  • At presentation, 19.2% of patients were asymptomatic, 27.5% had exertional angina, 46.6% had unstable angina, and 6.7% had MI.
  • Mortality and MI rates were 1.1% and 1.4%, respectively, at 30 days and 3.3% and 4.5%, respectively, at 6 months.
  • Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and those without ACS had similarly low mortality rates at 30 days (1.2% ACS vs 1.0% non-ACS, p = 0.65) and 6 months (3.4% ACS vs 3.3% non-ACS, p = 0.93) and MI rates at 30 days (1.3% ACS vs 1.4% non-ACS, p = 0.87) and 6 months (4.7% ACS vs 4.3% non-ACS, p = 0.65).

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  • (PMID = 17884372.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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10. ||||...... 42%  Lemesle G, Bonello L, De Labriolle A, Steinberg DH, Roy P, Slottow TL, Torguson R, Kaneshige K, Xue Z, Suddath WO, Satler LF, Kent KM, Lindsay J, Pichard AD, Waksman R: Impact of bivalirudin use on outcomes in nonagenarians undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. J Interv Cardiol; 2009 Feb;22(1):61-7
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  • In-hospital and 6-month rates of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and target lesion revascularization were indexed.
  • The clinical presentation was an acute MI in 59% of the cases.
  • Clinical presentations as MI or cardiogenic shock were associated with high rates of in-hospital death: 19.3% and 30%, respectively.
  • Predictors of 6-month outcomes were clinical presentations as MI or cardiogenic shock, renal failure, and total stent length.

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  • (PMID = 19281522.001).
  • [ISSN] 1540-8183
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of interventional cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Interv Cardiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anticoagulants; 0 / Hirudins; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Recombinant Proteins; 128270-60-0 / bivalirudin; 9005-49-6 / Heparin
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11. ||||...... 42%  Morden P, Drongowski RA, Geiger JD, Hirschl RB, Teitelbaum DH: Comparison of Karydakis versus midline excision for treatment of pilonidal sinus disease. Pediatr Surg Int; 2005 Oct;21(10):793-6
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  • [Title] Comparison of Karydakis versus midline excision for treatment of pilonidal sinus disease.
  • Pilonidal sinus disease is associated with a high rate of recurrence and complications.
  • The Karydakis (KAR) method, whereby an asymmetric subcutaneous flap obliterates the anal crease, has been shown to be effective in adults.
  • The goal of this study is to assess the efficacy of the KAR procedure in the operative treatment of children with pilonidal sinus disease compared to those treated via a midline excision (ME).
  • Sixty-eight cases of pediatric pilonidal sinus excision were reviewed over the past 10 years.
  • Data abstracted included surgical approach, complication rate and recurrence rate.
  • Student's t-test or the Chi square test was used for statistical analysis, with P < 0.05 being considered significant.
  • An ME was performed in 44 patients; the KAR method was used in 24 patients.
  • Mean age at diagnosis was 14.4 +/- 4.2 years for the ME group compared to 15.7 +/- 4.3 years for the KAR patients (P = 0.18).
  • Mean operative time was significantly longer with the KAR method (58.7 +/- 25.6 min) compared to 46.3 +/- 18.6 for the primary ME (P = 0.04).
  • Despite the increased operative dissection, there was no difference (P = 0.42) in early post-operative complication rates between groups (25% in the KAR group compared to 34.8% in the ME group).
  • Initial drainage of an abscess had no significant effect upon the recurrence/complication rate in either group.
  • Recurrence rate alone was lower in patients operated on via the KAR approach 0% versus 11.0% using the ME (P = 0.153).
  • Recurrence and complication rates were lower for those patients with a pilonidal sinus treated by the KAR method compared to the ME, but the results did not reach significance.
  • In conclusion, this study does show a potential benefit for children treated with the KAR method for pilonidal sinus.
  • This study mimics the data obtained in adult patients and suggests that a larger study is likely to achieve significance.
  • [MeSH-major] Pilonidal Sinus / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Child. Female. Humans. Male. Postoperative Complications. Recurrence. Reoperation. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 16172873.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric surgery international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Surg. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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12. ||||...... 42%  Roberts FO, Gunawardana DH, Pathmaraj K, Wallace A, U PL, Mi T, Berlangieri SU, O'Keefe GJ, Rowe CC, Scott AM: Radiation dose to PET technologists and strategies to lower occupational exposure. J Nucl Med Technol; 2005 Mar;33(1):44-7
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  • [Title] Radiation dose to PET technologists and strategies to lower occupational exposure.
  • OBJECTIVE: The use of PET in Australia has grown rapidly.
  • We conducted a prospective study of the radiation exposure of technologists working in PET and evaluated the occupational radiation dose after implementation of strategies to lower exposure.
  • METHODS: Radiation doses measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters over a 2-y period were reviewed both for technologists working in PET and for technologists working in general nuclear medicine in a busy academic nuclear medicine department.
  • The separate components of the procedures for dose administration and patient monitoring were assessed to identify the areas contributing the most to the dose received.
  • The impact on dose of implementing portable 511-keV syringe shields (primary shields) and larger trolley-mounted shields (secondary shields) was also compared with initial results using no shield.
  • RESULTS: We found that the radiation exposure of PET technologists was higher than that of technologists performing general nuclear medicine studies, with doses averaging 771 +/- 147 and 524 +/- 123 microSv per quarter, respectively (P = 0.01).
  • The estimated dose per PET procedure was 4.1 microSv (11 nSv/MBq).
  • Injection of 18F-FDG contributed the most to radiation exposure.
  • The 511-keV syringe shield reduced the average dose per injection from 2.5 to 1.4 microSv (P < 0.001).
  • For the longer period of dose transportation and injection, the additional use of the secondary shield resulted in a significantly lower dose of radiation than did use of the primary shield alone or no shield (1.9 vs. 3.6 microSv [P = 0.01] and 3.4 microSv [P = 0.03], respectively).
  • CONCLUSION: The radiation doses currently received by technologists working in PET are within accepted occupational health guidelines, but improved shielding can further reduce the dose.
  • [MeSH-major] Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital / statistics & numerical data. Occupational Exposure / prevention & control. Occupational Exposure / statistics & numerical data. Positron-Emission Tomography / statistics & numerical data. Radiation Monitoring / methods. Radiation Protection / methods. Risk Assessment / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Australia / epidemiology. Humans. Radiation Dosage. Radiation Injuries / prevention & control. Risk Factors. Thermoluminescent Dosimetry / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 15731021.001).
  • [ISSN] 0091-4916
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of nuclear medicine technology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Nucl Med Technol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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13. ||||...... 42%  Lemesle G, Bonello L, de Labriolle A, Steinberg DH, Roy P, Pinto Slottow TL, Torguson R, Kaneshige K, Xue Z, Suddath WO, Satler LF, Kent KM, Lindsay J, Pichard AD, Waksman R: Prognostic value of the Syntax score in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting for three-vessel coronary artery disease. Catheter Cardiovasc Interv; 2009 Apr 1;73(5):612-7
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  • During the 1-year follow-up, cardiovascular events including death, myocardial infarction (MI), and stroke were systematically indexed.
  • The primary end point was the composite criteria death/MI/stroke.
  • No statistical difference was found for the composite criteria death/MI/stroke: 9.4% versus 7.5% versus 10.4% in the groups with a Syntax score <24.5, 24.5-34, and >34, respectively (P = 0.754).

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
  • [CommentIn] Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2009 Apr 1;73(5):618-9 [19309708.001]
  • (PMID = 19309700.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-726X
  • [Journal-full-title] Catheterization and cardiovascular interventions : official journal of the Society for Cardiac Angiography & Interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Catheter Cardiovasc Interv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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14. ||||...... 42%  Barr JR, Pierce CL, Smith JR, Capacio BR, Woolfitt AR, Solano MI, Wooten JV, Lemire SW, Thomas JD, Ash DH, Ashley DL: Analysis of urinary metabolites of sulfur mustard in two individuals after accidental exposure. J Anal Toxicol; 2008 Jan-Feb;32(1):10-6
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  • [Title] Analysis of urinary metabolites of sulfur mustard in two individuals after accidental exposure.
  • In July 2004, two individuals developed blisters after the destruction of a WWI-era munition.
  • To determine the causative agent, urine samples were collected from both the highly blistered patient (patient 1; 6.5% of total body surface area) and patient 2, who had only one small blister.
  • Their urine was analyzed for metabolites of known vesicants including sulfur mustard (HD), Lewisite (L1), and nitrogen mustards.
  • The urine samples only tested positive for metabolites of HD.
  • Additional metabolites were measured to confirm the exposure of sulfur mustard agent HD, including thiodiglycol (TDG), TDG-sulfoxide, and the bis-mercapturate of mustard sulfone.
  • On day 2 after the exposure, patient 1 had a beta-lyase metabolite level of 41 ng/mL, and patient 2 had a level of 2.6 ng/mL.
  • Detectable levels of the beta-lyase metabolite were observed in patient 1 for 11 days and in patient 2 for 7 days.
  • Levels of TDG and both TDG and its sulfoxide measured together in the urine of patient 1 were found to be 24 ng/mL and 50 ng/mL, respectively, on day 2.
  • The bis-mercapturate of mustard sulfone was detected in patient 1 (3.1 ng/mL) on day 2 but was not detected in samples taken on subsequent days.
  • [MeSH-major] Environmental Monitoring / methods. Mustard Gas / analysis
  • [MeSH-minor] Biological Markers / urine. Chromatography, Liquid. Environmental Exposure / analysis. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Humans. Lyases / metabolism. Sulfhydryl Compounds / urine. Sulfoxides / urine. Tandem Mass Spectrometry

  • HSDB. structure - THIODIGLYCOL.
  • HSDB. structure - BIS(2-CHLOROETHYL)SULFIDE.
  • HSDB. structure - TRI-N-BUTYLTIN HYDRIDE.
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  • (PMID = 18269787.001).
  • [ISSN] 0146-4760
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of analytical toxicology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Anal Toxicol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biological Markers; 0 / Sulfhydryl Compounds; 0 / Sulfoxides; 2580-77-0 / 2,2'-sulfinylbisethanol; 9BW5T43J04 / 2,2'-thiodiethanol; EC 4.- / Lyases; T8KEC9FH9P / Mustard Gas
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15. ||||...... 42%  Gruber SA, West MS, Sillix DH, El-Amm JM, Garnick J, Morawski K, Haririan A: Preliminary results with early corticosteroid withdrawal in African American renal allograft recipients. Surgery; 2005 Oct;138(4):772-8; discussion 778-9
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  • [Title] Preliminary results with early corticosteroid withdrawal in African American renal allograft recipients.
  • BACKGROUND: There is a paucity of data regarding the use of steroid-avoidance immunosuppression (SAI) in African American (AA) renal allograft recipients, traditionally considered a high-risk subgroup of patients with higher reported rates of acute rejection and graft loss.
  • METHODS: We compared the outcomes of 27 AA renal allograft recipients receiving SAI (SA group; mean follow-up period, 12 +/- 3 mo) with those of 20 patients receiving a steroid taper (ST group; 24 +/- 11 mo).
  • In both groups, thymoglobulin was used for induction, and mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus were used for maintenance.
  • Four doses of methylprednisolone were given on days 0 to 3.
  • In the SA group no further steroids were given, whereas in the ST group a prednisone taper was continued thereafter.
  • RESULTS: ST patients were more likely to have current panel reactive antibody titers greater than 10%, undergo retransplantation, and receive more doses of thymoglobulin.
  • There were no significant differences between the SA and ST groups with regard to patient survival (96% vs 95%), graft survival (96% vs 90%), acute rejection (11% vs 14%), cytomegalovirus infection (7% vs 10%), posttransplant diabetes mellitus (11% vs 24%), or mean serum creatinine concentration at 6 months (1.6 vs 1.5 mg/dL), respectively, with a trend toward less percent weight gain in SA patients at 6 months (5% vs 11%, P = .06).
  • CONCLUSIONS: SAI can produce excellent short-term results in AA kidney transplant patients when compared with a conventional ST protocol.
  • Our results will need to be verified in larger numbers of patients with longer follow-up evaluation.
  • [MeSH-major] Adrenal Cortex Hormones / administration & dosage. African Americans. Kidney Transplantation
  • [MeSH-minor] Acute Disease. Adult. Biopsy. Case-Control Studies. Drug Administration Schedule. Graft Rejection / epidemiology. Graft Survival. Humans. Immunosuppressive Agents / therapeutic use. Incidence. Kidney / pathology. Leukopenia / epidemiology. Methylprednisolone / administration & dosage. Methylprednisolone / therapeutic use. Middle Aged. Prednisone / administration & dosage. Prednisone / therapeutic use. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis. Transplantation, Homologous. Treatment Outcome


16. ||||...... 42%  Slottow TL, Steinberg DH, Roy P, Javaid A, Buch AN, Okabe T, Xue Z, Smith K, Torguson R, Pichard AD, Satler LF, Suddath WO, Kent KM, Waksman R: Drug-eluting stents are associated with similar cardiovascular outcomes when compared to bare metal stents in the setting of acute myocardial infarction. Cardiovasc Revasc Med; 2008 Jan-Mar;9(1):24-8
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  • At 1 year, all-cause mortality was 13.3% in the BMS group and 9.2% in the DES group [P=not significant (ns)], recurrent MI was 5.3% in the BMS group vs. 4.4% in the DES group (P=ns), and TVR was 7% in the BMS group vs. 8.7% in the DES group (P=ns).

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  • (PMID = 18206634.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-0938
  • [Journal-full-title] Cardiovascular revascularization medicine : including molecular interventions
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cardiovasc Revasc Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiovascular Agents; 0 / Metals; 0 / Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors; 33069-62-4 / Paclitaxel; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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17. ||||...... 42%  Wylie BJ, Hashmi AH, Singh N, Singh MP, Tuchman J, Hussain M, Sabin L, Yeboah-Antwi K, Banerjee C, Brooks MI, Desai M, Udhayakumar V, Macleod WB, Dash AP, Hamer DH: Availability and utilization of malaria prevention strategies in pregnancy in eastern India. BMC Public Health; 2010;10:557
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  • [Title] Availability and utilization of malaria prevention strategies in pregnancy in eastern India.
  • BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy in India, as elsewhere, is responsible for maternal anemia and adverse pregnancy outcomes such as low birth weight and preterm birth.It is not known whether prevention and treatment strategies for malaria in pregnancy (case management, insecticide-treated bednets, intermittent preventive therapy) are widely utilized in India.
  • METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted during 2006-2008 in two states of India, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh, at 7 facilities representing a range of rural and urban populations and areas of more versus less stable malaria transmission.
  • 280 antenatal visits (40/site) were observed by study personnel coupled with exit interviews of pregnant women to assess emphasis upon, availability and utilization of malaria prevention practices by health workers and pregnant women.
  • The facilities were assessed for the availability of antimalarials, lab supplies and bednets.
  • RESULTS: All participating facilities were equipped to perform malaria blood smears; none used rapid diagnostic tests.
  • Chloroquine, endorsed for chemoprophylaxis during pregnancy by the government at the time of the study, was stocked regularly at all facilities although the quantity stocked varied.
  • Availability of alternative antimalarials for use in pregnancy was less consistent.
  • In Jharkhand, no health worker recommended bednet use during the antenatal visit yet over 90% of pregnant women had bednets in their household.
  • In Chhattisgarh, bednets were available at all facilities but only 14.4% of health workers recommended their use.
  • 40% of the pregnant women interviewed had bednets in their household.
  • Only 1.4% of all households owned an insecticide-treated bednet; yet 40% of all women reported their households had been sprayed with insecticide.
  • Antimalarial chemoprophylaxis with chloroquine was prescribed in only 2 (0.7%) and intermittent preventive therapy prescribed in only one (0.4%) of the 280 observed visits.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A disconnect remains between routine antenatal practices in India and known strategies to prevent and treat malaria in pregnancy.
  • Prevention strategies, in particular the use of insecticide-treated bednets, are underutilized.
  • Gaps highlighted by this study combined with recent estimates of the prevalence of malaria during pregnancy in these areas should be used to revise governmental policy and target increased educational efforts among health care workers and pregnant women.
  • [MeSH-major] Health Services Accessibility. Malaria / prevention & control. Preventive Health Services / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Case Management. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. India. Pregnancy. Young Adult

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  • [Cites] Ann Trop Med Parasitol. 2001 Jan;95(1):19-29 [11235550.001]
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  • (PMID = 20849590.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2458
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC public health
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Public Health
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / R03 HD52167-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2949771
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18. ||||...... 42%  de Waard MC, van der Velden J, Bito V, Ozdemir S, Biesmans L, Boontje NM, Dekkers DH, Schoonderwoerd K, Schuurbiers HC, de Crom R, Stienen GJ, Sipido KR, Lamers JM, Duncker DJ: Early exercise training normalizes myofilament function and attenuates left ventricular pump dysfunction in mice with a large myocardial infarction. Circ Res; 2007 Apr 13;100(7):1079-88
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  • The extent and mechanism of the cardiac benefit of early exercise training following myocardial infarction (MI) is incompletely understood, but may involve blunting of abnormalities in Ca(2+)-handling and myofilament function.
  • Consequently, we investigated the effects of 8-weeks of voluntary exercise, started early after a large MI, on left ventricular (LV) remodeling and dysfunction in the mouse.
  • Exercise had no effect on survival, MI size or LV dimensions, but improved LV fractional shortening from 8+/-1 to 12+/-1%, and LVdP/dt(P30) from 5295+/-207 to 5794+/-207 mm Hg/s (both P<0.05), and reduced pulmonary congestion.
  • These global effects of exercise were associated with normalization of the MI-induced increase in myofilament Ca(2+)-sensitivity (DeltapCa(50)=0.037).
  • Exercise prevented the MI-induced decreased maximum force generating capacity of skinned cardiomyocytes (F(max) increased from 14.3+/-0.7 to 18.3+/-0.8 kN/m(2) P<0.05), which was associated with enhanced shortening of unloaded intact cardiomyocytes (from 4.1+/-0.3 to 7.0+/-0.6%; P<0.05).
  • In conclusion, early exercise in mice after a large MI has no effect on LV remodeling, but attenuates global LV dysfunction.

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  • [CommentIn] Circ Res. 2007 Apr 13;100(7):937-9 [17431194.001]
  • (PMID = 17347478.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4571
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Proteins; E0399OZS9N / Cyclic AMP
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19. ||||...... 42%  Mukherjee R, Mingoia JT, Bruce JA, Austin JS, Stroud RE, Escobar GP, McClister DM Jr, Allen CM, Alfonso-Jaume MA, Fini ME, Lovett DH, Spinale FG: Selective spatiotemporal induction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9 transcription after myocardial infarction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol; 2006 Nov;291(5):H2216-28
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  • Myocardial remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with increased levels of the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).
  • Levels of two MMP species, MMP-2 and MMP-9, are increased after MI, and transgenic deletion of these MMPs attenuates post-MI left ventricular (LV) remodeling.
  • This study characterized the spatiotemporal patterns of gene promoter induction for MMP-2 and MMP-9 after MI.
  • MI was induced in transgenic mice in which the MMP-2 or MMP-9 promoter sequence was fused to the beta-galactosidase reporter, and reporter level was assayed up to 28 days after MI.
  • After MI, LV diameter increased by 70% (P < 0.05), consistent with LV remodeling. beta-Galactosidase staining in MMP-2 reporter mice was increased by 1 day after MI and increased further to 64 +/- 6% of LV epicardial area by 7 days after MI (P < 0.05).
  • MMP-2 promoter activation occurred in fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in the MI region.
  • In MMP-9 reporter mice, promoter induction was detected after 3 days and peaked at 7 days after MI (53 +/- 6%, P < 0.05) and was colocalized with inflammatory cells at the peri-infarct region.
  • Although MMP-2 promoter activation was similarly distributed in the MI and border regions, activation of the MMP-9 promoter was highest at the border between the MI and remote regions.
  • These unique findings visually demonstrated that activation of the MMP-2 and MMP-9 gene promoters occurs in a distinct spatial relation with reference to the MI region and changes in a characteristic time-dependent manner after MI.

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  • (PMID = 16766634.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-29776; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY-12651; United States / NEI NIH HHS / EY / EY-14801; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-45024; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-66029; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-97012; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01-HL-48788; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01-HL-68738
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 3.2.1.23 / beta-Galactosidase; EC 3.4.24.24 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 2; EC 3.4.24.35 / Matrix Metalloproteinase 9
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20. ||||...... 41%  Wang GR, Zhao YZ, Qian LS, Zou DH, Li R, Mi YC, Wang XX, Qiu LG: [Analysis of long-term treatment outcome and related factors in 95 chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib]. Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi; 2008 Jan;29(1):18-22
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  • [Title] [Analysis of long-term treatment outcome and related factors in 95 chronic myeloid leukemia patients treated with imatinib].
  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of imatinib in the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and analyse the treatment outcome and related factors.
  • METHODS: Ninety five CML patients were treated with imatinib in our hospital from May 2002 to May 2006.
  • The outcomes and related factors were analysed. RESULTS:.
  • (1) One year after therapy, there were 95.5% of chronic phase (CP) patients achieved complete hematologic response (CHR).
  • Fifty-two patients with complete cytogenetic dates were divided into primary-therapy group (n = 19) and secondary-therapy group (n = 33).
  • The major cytogenetic responses (MCyR) at 6-, 12-, 18-, 24- and 30-months after therapy for the former group were 84.2%, 84.2%, 89.5%, 89.5% and 94.7%, and for the latter group were 36.4%, 39.4%, 39.4%, 39.4% and 39.4%, respectively (P < 0.01).
  • The expected survival at 12-, 24-, 36- and 50-month after imatinib treatment for CP group was (98.1 +/-1.9)%, (87.8 +/- 7.1)%, (81.9 +/- 8.7)% and (81.9 +/- 8.7)%, respectively. (2) Twelve month after therapy, there are 70% of accelerated phase (AP) patients achieve CHR and 10% get MCyR.
  • The expected survival at 12-, 24- and 36-month after imatinib treatment for AP group was (63.0 +/- 17.7)%, (15.8 +/- 14.3)% and (15.8 +/- 14.3)%, respectively. (3) Six month after therapy, 57.9% of blast crisis (BC) patients achieve CHR, with the expected survival at 12- and 24-month of (40.6 +/- 12.3)% and 0, respectively. (4) COX analysis CP group indicated that imatinib therapy administered for previously untreated was an independent favorable prognostic factor.
  • Conclusion (1) Imatinib as a primary treatment for CP CML can significantly improve the survival time as compared with that AP or BC patients or with that used in previously treated patients. (2) Imatinib could induce hematologic, even cytogenetic response to a certain extent, in CP or BC patients and prolong the survival time.
  • [MeSH-major] Antineoplastic Agents / therapeutic use. Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive / drug therapy. Piperazines / therapeutic use. Pyrimidines / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Benzamides. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


21. ||||...... 41%  Brown JK, Campbell BT, Drongowski RA, Alderman AK, Geiger JD, Teitelbaum DH, Quinn J, Coran AG, Hirschl RB: A prospective, randomized comparison of skin adhesive and subcuticular suture for closure of pediatric hernia incisions: cost and cosmetic considerations. J Pediatr Surg; 2009 Jul;44(7):1418-22
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  • [Title] A prospective, randomized comparison of skin adhesive and subcuticular suture for closure of pediatric hernia incisions: cost and cosmetic considerations.
  • PURPOSE: In this study, we compared the skin adhesive 2-octylcyanoacrylate to subcuticular suture for closure of pediatric inguinal hernia incisions to determine if skin adhesive improves wound cosmesis, shortens skin closure time, and lowers operative costs.
  • METHODS: We prospectively randomized 134 children undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy at our institution to have skin closure with either skin adhesive (n = 64) or subcuticular closure (n = 70).
  • Data collected included age, sex, weight, type of operation, total operative time, and skin closure time.
  • Digital photographs of healing incisions were taken at the 6-week postoperative visit.
  • The operating surgeon assessed cosmetic outcome of incisions using a previously validated visual analog scale, as well as an ordinate scale.
  • A blinded assessment of cosmetic outcome was then performed by an independent surgeon comparing these photographs to the visual analog scale.
  • Operating room time and resource use (ie, costs) relative to the skin closure were assessed.
  • Comparisons between groups were done using Student's t tests and chi(2) tests.
  • RESULTS: Children enrolled in the study had a mean +/- SE age of 3.7 +/- 0.3 years and weighed 16 +/- 0.8 kg.
  • Patients were predominantly male (82%).
  • Patients underwent 1 of 3 types of open hernia repair as follows: unilateral herniorrhaphy without peritoneoscopy (n = 41; 31%), unilateral herniorrhaphy with peritoneoscopy (n = 55; 41%), and bilateral herniorrhaphy (n = 38; 28%).
  • Skin closure time was significantly shorter in the skin adhesive group (adhesive = 1.4 +/- 0.8 minutes vs suture = 2.4 +/- 1.1 minutes; P = .001).
  • Mean wound cosmesis scores based on the visual analog scale were similar between groups (adhesive = 78 +/- 21; suture=78 +/- 18; P = .50).
  • Material costs related to herniorrhaphy were higher for skin adhesive (adhesive = $22.63 vs suture = $11.70; P < .001), whereas operating room time costs for adhesive skin closure were lower (adhesive = $9.33 +/- 5.33 vs suture = $16.00 +/- 7.33; P < .001).
  • Except for a 7% incidence of erythema in both groups, there were no complications encountered.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There is no difference in cosmetic outcome between skin adhesive and suture closure in pediatric inguinal herniorrhaphy.
  • Material costs are increased because of the high cost of adhesive relative to suture.
  • This is partially offset, however, by the cost savings from reduction in operating room time.
  • [MeSH-major] Hernia, Inguinal / surgery. Hospital Costs. Laparoscopy / methods. Patient Satisfaction. Suture Techniques / instrumentation. Sutures / ethics. Tissue Adhesives
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Male. Prospective Studies. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing

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  • (PMID = 19573672.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Tissue Adhesives
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22. ||||...... 41%  Lee JY, Janes BK, Passalacqua KD, Pfleger BF, Bergman NH, Liu H, Håkansson K, Somu RV, Aldrich CC, Cendrowski S, Hanna PC, Sherman DH: Biosynthetic analysis of the petrobactin siderophore pathway from Bacillus anthracis. J Bacteriol; 2007 Mar;189(5):1698-710
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  • [Title] Biosynthetic analysis of the petrobactin siderophore pathway from Bacillus anthracis.
  • The asbABCDEF gene cluster from Bacillus anthracis is responsible for biosynthesis of petrobactin, a catecholate siderophore that functions in both iron acquisition and virulence in a murine model of anthrax.
  • We initiated studies to determine the biosynthetic details of petrobactin assembly based on mutational analysis of the asb operon, identification of accumulated intermediates, and addition of exogenous siderophores to asb mutant strains.
  • As a starting point, in-frame deletions of each of the genes in the asb locus (asbABCDEF) were constructed.
  • The individual mutations resulted in complete abrogation of petrobactin biosynthesis when strains were grown on iron-depleted medium.
  • However, in vitro analysis showed that each asb mutant grew to a very limited extent as vegetative cells in iron-depleted medium.
  • In contrast, none of the B. anthracis asb mutant strains were able to outgrow from spores under the same culture conditions.
  • Provision of exogenous petrobactin was able to rescue the growth defect in each asb mutant strain.
  • Taken together, these data provide compelling evidence that AsbA performs the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of petrobactin, involving condensation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidine with citrate to form 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidinyl citrate.
  • As a final step, the data reveal that AsbB catalyzes condensation of a second molecule of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidine with 3,4-dihydroxybenzoyl spermidinyl citrate to form the mature siderophore.
  • This work sets the stage for detailed biochemical studies with this unique acyl carrier protein-dependent, nonribosomal peptide synthetase-independent biosynthetic system.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacillus anthracis / metabolism. Benzamides / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Base Sequence. Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid. Genetic Complementation Test. Iron / metabolism. Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Sequence Data. Mutation. Operon

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  • [Cites] Annu Rev Microbiol. 2000;54:881-941 [11018148.001]
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  • (PMID = 17189355.001).
  • [ISSN] 0021-9193
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of bacteriology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Bacteriol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Benzamides; 0 / petrobactin; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC1855748
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23. ||||...... 41%  Lee JH, Yang DH, Park HS, Cho Y, Jeong MH, Kim YJ, Kim KS, Hur SH, Seong IW, Hong TJ, Cho MC, Kim CJ, Jun JE, Park WH, Chae SC, Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry Investigators: Suboptimal use of evidence-based medical therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction from the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry: prescription rate, predictors, and prognostic value. Am Heart J; 2010 Jun;159(6):1012-9
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  • METHODS: Between November 2005 and January 2008, we evaluated the discharge medications among 9,294 post-MI survivors who did not have any documented contraindications to antiplatelet drugs, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is)/angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), or statins in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20569714.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6744
  • [Journal-full-title] American heart journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. Heart J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors; 0 / Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors; 0 / Prescription Drugs
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24. ||||...... 41%  Jackson KJ, Kota DH, Martin BR, Damaj MI: The role of various nicotinic receptor subunits and factors influencing nicotine conditioned place aversion. Neuropharmacology; 2009 May-Jun;56(6-7):970-4
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  • [Title] The role of various nicotinic receptor subunits and factors influencing nicotine conditioned place aversion.
  • Affective nicotine withdrawal symptoms are of major motivational significance in contributing to relapse and continued tobacco use; thus, it is important to understand the molecular and receptor-mediated mechanisms that mediate affective withdrawal behaviors.
  • Previous work using the conditioned place aversion (CPA) model has shown that nicotine withdrawal is associated with a negative affective state, and place aversion to previously neutral environmental stimuli represents a motivational component in the maintenance of drug use.
  • Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of genotype, sex, and age and to extend previous studies examining the role of various nicotinic receptor subtypes in the development of nicotine withdrawal aversion using the CPA model.
  • Mice were chronically treated with nicotine and conditioned for two days with various nicotinic receptor antagonists.
  • The major findings showed that mecamylamine and dihydro-beta-erythroidine (DHbetaE), but not hexamethonium or methyllycaconitine citrate (MLA), precipitated significant aversion in the CPA model.
  • This pharmacological data support our previous knockout mouse data suggesting that nicotine CPA is mediated by central beta2-containing nicotinic receptors, but not alpha7 nicotinic receptors.
  • Further, we show that sex and age are contributing factors to the development of nicotine CPA.
  • Overall, the results of our study provide some insight into pharmacological and behavioral factors involved in the development of an aversive motivational component associated with nicotine withdrawal.
  • [MeSH-major] Avoidance Learning / drug effects. Conditioning (Psychology) / drug effects. Nicotine / adverse effects. Receptors, Nicotinic / physiology. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Age Factors. Animals. Female. Male. Mice. Nicotinic Antagonists / pharmacology. Protein Subunits / physiology. Sex Factors. Species Specificity

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  • (PMID = 19371584.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-7064
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuropharmacology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuropharmacology
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA-05274; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / DA-12610; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R01 DA012610
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Nicotinic Antagonists; 0 / Protein Subunits; 0 / Receptors, Nicotinic; 54-11-5 / Nicotine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS522966; NLM/ PMC3821837
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25. ||||...... 41%  Xagoraraki I, Kuo DH, Wong K, Wong M, Rose JB: Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational beaches of the great lakes. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2007 Dec;73(24):7874-81
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  • [Title] Occurrence of human adenoviruses at two recreational beaches of the great lakes.
  • Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) have been related to several waterborne diseases such as acute gastroenteritis, conjunctivitis, and respiratory illness, and it has been shown that an important human exposure pathway is through recreational waters.
  • However, HAdV occurrence at recreational freshwater beaches has not been previously investigated.
  • In this study, a total of 58 water samples were collected from two recreational beaches on Lake Michigan (i.e., Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach) during the summer of 2004.
  • Occurrences of HAdVs in these lake samples were determined using two hexon-based real-time PCR assays (one for monitoring all 51 serotypes of HAdVs and another for specifically detecting F species HAdVs, i.e., serotypes 40 and 41) and compared to an integrated cell culture (ICC) PCR method.
  • The real-time PCR results showed that 8 of 30 Silver Beach samples and 6 of 28 Washington Park Beach samples contained HAdVs, and F species HAdVs were detected in three of these positive samples.
  • The concentrations of HAdVs ranged from (1.7 +/- 0.7) x 10(1) to (3.4 +/- 0.8) x 10(2) and from (7 +/- 2) x 10(0) to (3.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(3) virus particles/liter for Silver Beach and Washington Park Beach, respectively.
  • F species HAdVs were detected at levels ranging from (4.8 +/- 0.8) x 10(1) to (4.6 +/- 1.5) x 10(2) virus particles/liter.
  • Approximately 60% of the ICC-PCR analyses agreed with the real-time PCR results.
  • This study revealed the occurrence of HAdVs at Lake Michigan recreational beaches.
  • Given the potential health risks, further assessment regarding sources, virus transport, and survival is needed to improve the safety of the region.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviridae / classification. Adenoviridae / isolation & purification. Fresh Water / virology
  • [MeSH-minor] Capsid Proteins / genetics. DNA, Viral / genetics. Great Lakes Region. Humans. Polymerase Chain Reaction / methods. Virus Cultivation / methods

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  • (PMID = 17933924.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Capsid Proteins; 0 / DNA, Viral; 0 / hexon capsid protein, Adenovirus
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2168141
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26. ||||...... 41%  Shankaranarayanan A, Boguth CA, Lutz S, Vettel C, Uhlemann F, Aittaleb M, Wieland T, Tesmer JJ: Galpha q allosterically activates and relieves autoinhibition of p63RhoGEF. Cell Signal; 2010 Jul;22(7):1114-23
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  • We next identify specific structural elements in the PH domain that inhibit basal nucleotide exchange activity, and provide evidence that G alpha(q) overcomes this inhibition by altering the conformation of the alpha 6-alpha N linker that joins the DH and PH domains, a region that forms direct contacts with RhoA.

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  • [Copyright] (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20214977.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-3913
  • [Journal-full-title] Cellular signalling
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cell. Signal.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL071818; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL086865; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL071818-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL086865; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL086865-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors; 0 / Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors; 0 / p63RhoGEF protein, human; EC 3.6.5.1 / GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gq-G11
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS186458; NLM/ PMC2862694
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27. ||||...... 41%  de Waard MC, van der Velden J, Boontje NM, Dekkers DH, van Haperen R, Kuster DW, Lamers JM, de Crom R, Duncker DJ: Detrimental effect of combined exercise training and eNOS overexpression on cardiac function after myocardial infarction. Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol; 2009 May;296(5):H1513-23
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  • It has been reported that exercise after myocardial infarction (MI) attenuates left ventricular (LV) pump dysfunction by normalization of myofilament function.
  • Consequently, we first tested the hypothesis that the effects of exercise after MI can be mimicked by elevated eNOS expression using transgenic mice with overexpression of human eNOS (eNOSTg).
  • Both exercise and eNOSTg attenuated LV remodeling and dysfunction after MI in mice and improved cardiomyocyte maximal force development (F(max)).
  • In view of these partly complementary actions, we subsequently tested the hypothesis that combining exercise and eNOSTg would provide additional protection against LV remodeling and dysfunction after MI.
  • In conclusion, the combination of exercise and elevated eNOS expression abolished the cardioprotective effects of either treatment alone after MI, which appeared to be, at least in part, the result of increased oxidative stress secondary to eNOS "uncoupling. "

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  • (PMID = 19286956.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6135
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antioxidants; 11062-77-4 / Superoxides; 17528-72-2 / 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin; 22150-76-1 / Biopterin; 94ZLA3W45F / Arginine; EC 1.14.13.39 / NOS3 protein, human; EC 1.14.13.39 / Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III; EC 3.6.3.8 / Sarcoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-Transporting ATPases; WYQ7N0BPYC / Acetylcysteine
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28. ||||...... 41%  Lee SP, Kim SY, Park KW, Shin DH, Kang HJ, Koo BK, Suh JW, Cho YS, Yeon TJ, Chae IH, Choi DJ, Kim HS: Long-term clinical outcome of chronic total occlusive lesions treated with drug-eluting stents: comparison of sirolimus-eluting and paclitaxel-eluting stents. Circ J; 2010 Apr;74(4):693-700
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  • During mean follow-up of 2 years, the SES group had a significantly lower cumulative target vessel failure (TVF) rate than the PES group (14.9% vs 28.4%, P=0.01), as a consequence of lower target vessel revascularization (9.7% vs 23.9%, P=0.01) and also a partially lower rate of myocardial infarction (MI: 3.1% vs 7.6%, P=0.04).
  • Predictors for TVF were use of PES (hazard ratio (HR) 3.81, P<0.01), previous history of MI (HR 4.06, P<0.01), diabetes (HR 2.07, P=0.04) and chronic kidney disease (CKD; HR 3.56, P=0.05).

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  • (PMID = 20197629.001).
  • [ISSN] 1347-4820
  • [Journal-full-title] Circulation journal : official journal of the Japanese Circulation Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Circ. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] Japan
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 33069-62-4 / Paclitaxel; W36ZG6FT64 / Sirolimus
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29. ||||...... 41%  Cote ML, Schenk M, Schwartz AG, Vigneau FD, Kinnard M, Greenson JK, Fryzek JP, Ying GS, Garabrant DH: Risk of other cancers in individuals with a family history of pancreas cancer. J Gastrointest Cancer; 2007;38(2-4):119-26
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  • [Title] Risk of other cancers in individuals with a family history of pancreas cancer.
  • BACKGROUND: Inherited predisposition to pancreas cancer accounts for approximately 10% of cases.
  • Familial aggregation may be influenced by shared environmental factors and shared genes.
  • We evaluate whether a family history of pancreas cancer is a risk factor for ten specified cancers in first-degree relatives: bladder, breast, colon, head and neck, lung, lymphoma, melanoma, ovary, pancreas, and prostate.
  • METHODS: Risk factor data and cancer family history were obtained for 1,816 first-degree relatives of pancreas cancer case probands (n = 247) and 3,157 first-degree relatives of control probands (n = 420).
  • Unconditional logistic regression models using generalized estimating equations were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs), and 95% confidence intervals of having a first-degree relative a specified cancer.
  • RESULTS: A family history of pancreas cancer was associated with a doubled risk of lymphoma (OR = 2.83, 95% CI = 1.02-7.86) and ovarian cancer (OR = 2.25, 95% CI = 0.77-6.60) among relatives after adjustment.
  • Relatives with a family history of early-onset pancreas cancer in a proband had a sevenfold increased risk of lymphoma (OR = 7.31, 95% CI = 1.45 to 36.7).
  • Relatives who ever smoked and had a family history of pancreas cancer had a fivefold increased risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 1.16-20.6).
  • CONCLUSION: Family history assessment of cancer risk should include all cancers.
  • Assessment of other known and suspected risk factors in relatives will improve risk evaluation.
  • As screening and surveillance methods are developed, identifying those at highest risk is crucial for a successful screening program.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenocarcinoma / genetics. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Pancreatic Neoplasms / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Factors. Aged. Case-Control Studies. Family Health. Female. Humans. Interviews as Topic. Male. Middle Aged. Risk Factors. Smoking

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  • (PMID = 19089664.001).
  • [ISSN] 1941-6628
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of gastrointestinal cancer
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Gastrointest Cancer
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CN / N01-CN-65064; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES007129-03; United States / NIEHS NIH HHS / ES / R01 ES07129; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / RC25-CA7716
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS126067; NLM/ PMC2719298
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30. ||||...... 41%  Craig DH, Haimovich B, Basson MD: Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol; 2007 Dec;293(6):C1862-74
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  • [Title] Alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation modulates pressure-induced colon cancer cell adhesion through regulation of focal adhesion kinase-Src interaction.
  • Physical forces including pressure, strain, and shear can be converted into intracellular signals that regulate diverse aspects of cell biology.
  • Exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulates colon cancer cell adhesion by a beta(1)-integrin-dependent mechanism that requires an intact cytoskeleton and activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Src. alpha-Actinin facilitates focal adhesion formation and physically links integrin-associated focal adhesion complexes with the cytoskeleton.
  • We therefore hypothesized that alpha-actinin may be necessary for the mechanical response pathway that mediates pressure-stimulated cell adhesion.
  • We reduced alpha-actinin-1 and alpha-actinin-4 expression with isoform-specific small interfering (si)RNA.
  • Silencing of alpha-actinin-1, but not alpha-actinin-4, blocked pressure-stimulated cell adhesion in human SW620, HT-29, and Caco-2 colon cancer cell lines.
  • Cell exposure to increased extracellular pressure stimulated alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and alpha-actinin-1 interaction with FAK and/or Src, and enhanced FAK phosphorylation at residues Y397 and Y576.
  • The requirement for alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation in the pressure response was investigated by expressing the alpha-actinin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation mutant Y12F in the colon cancer cells.
  • Expression of Y12F blocked pressure-mediated adhesion and inhibited the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 with FAK and Src, as well as FAK activation.
  • Furthermore, siRNA-mediated reduction of alpha-actinin-1 eliminated the pressure-induced association of alpha-actinin-1 and Src with beta(1)-integrin receptor, as well as FAK-Src complex formation.
  • These results suggest that alpha-actinin-1 phosphorylation at Y12 plays a crucial role in pressure-activated cell adhesion and mechanotransduction by facilitating Src recruitment to beta(1)-integrin, and consequently the association of FAK with Src, to enhance FAK phosphorylation.
  • [MeSH-major] Actinin / metabolism. Carcinoma / metabolism. Colonic Neoplasms / metabolism. Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases / metabolism. Mechanotransduction, Cellular / physiology. src-Family Kinases / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Antigens, CD29 / metabolism. Blotting, Western. Caco-2 Cells. Cell Adhesion / physiology. Gene Silencing. HT29 Cells. Humans. Immunoprecipitation. Mutation. Phosphorylation. Pressure. RNA, Small Interfering. Transfection

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  • (PMID = 17898132.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6143
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Cell physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol., Cell Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK06771
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / ACTN1 protein, human; 0 / Antigens, CD29; 0 / RNA, Small Interfering; 11003-00-2 / Actinin; EC 2.7.10.2 / Focal Adhesion Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; EC 2.7.10.2 / src-Family Kinases
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31. ||||...... 41%  Coker RH, Williams RH, Kortebein PM, Sullivan DH, Evans WJ: Influence of exercise intensity on abdominal fat and adiponectin in elderly adults. Metab Syndr Relat Disord; 2009 Aug;7(4):363-8
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  • To examine the influence of moderate-intensity (50% of VO(2peak)) exercise training (MI) versus high-intensity (75% of VO(2peak)) exercise training (HI) on regional fat distribution and plasma adiponectin, we randomized 18 overweight (body mass index [BMI] = 30 +/- 1 kg/m(2)) elderly (71 +/- 1 years) to HI, MI, or a control group (CON).
  • Subjects enrolled in HI or MI completed a 12-week exercise training protocol designed to expend 1000 kcal/week.
  • VO(2peak) improved in HI and MI, whereas there was no change in VO(2peak) in CON.
  • No significant change in body weight, BMI, and % fat occurred in MI, HI, or CON.
  • Although there was a significant reduction in visceral fat with HI (-39 cm(2)), there was no change in the MI or CON groups.
  • There were no changes in thigh muscle attenuation in the MI and CON groups.
  • Also, there was no change in plasma adiponectin in the MI, HI, or CON groups.

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  • (PMID = 19196080.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8518
  • [Journal-full-title] Metabolic syndrome and related disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Metab Syndr Relat Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / K01 DK 64716-01; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR14288; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / R01 AG 19346-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Adiponectin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3135883
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32. ||||...... 41%  Esper DH, Coplin WM, Carhuapoma JR: Energy expenditure in patients with nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr; 2006 Mar-Apr;30(2):71-5
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  • [Title] Energy expenditure in patients with nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage.
  • BACKGROUND: Patients with intracerebral (ICH), intraventricular (IVH) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) have increased morbidity and mortality compared with other forms of stroke.
  • We postulate that the systemic inflammatory state triggered by these forms of nontraumatic intracranial hemorrhage (IH) translates into higher nutrition requirements than traditionally assumed.
  • In order to test this hypothesis, we performed a retrospective study comparing the resting energy expenditure (REE) of 14 mechanically ventilated IH patients with the REE of 6 severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI) patients (a disease known to induce an increased metabolic state).
  • METHODS: Using nonparametric analysis, we compared 2 contemporary cohorts of patients-IH and sTBI-who required mechanical ventilation and who underwent indirect calorimetry (IC) within 7 days after the ictus.
  • RESULTS: Fourteen patients with nontraumatic IH (IVH, 2; SAH, 9; SAH/ICH, 1; ICH/SAH/IVH, 2) who underwent IC within 7 days from injury were identified; median age: 59 (28-84) years, median admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS): 6 (4-9), and median APACHE II: 19.5 (15-28).
  • A control cohort of 6 patients with sTBI was identified; median age: 57.5 (18-80) years, admission GCS: 6.5 (4-8), and APACHE II: 16 (11-31).
  • Sedation was used in 11/14 patients with IH and in 5/6 severe TBI patients.
  • No patient was pharmacologically paralyzed.
  • Median REE was 1810 (1124-2806) and 2238 (1860-2780) kcal/d for the IH and for the sTBI patient cohorts, respectively.
  • Using Wilcoxon signed ranks test, the 2 patient groups were found comparable in regard to baseline clinical variables and disease severity (APACHE II).
  • We did not identify a statistically significant difference in the REE between these 2 cohorts of patients (p = .25).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe TBI and patients with IH have similar increments in metabolic rate during the initial phase (1 week from onset) of their disease.
  • This information needs to be confirmed in a larger cohort of patients.
  • If reproduced, our results suggest that nontraumatic IH patients are at high risk of inadequate nutrition if their metabolic rate is estimated after conventional nutrition practice.
  • [MeSH-major] Energy Metabolism / physiology. Intracranial Hemorrhages / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] APACHE. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Brain Injuries / metabolism. Calorimetry, Indirect. Cerebral Hemorrhage / metabolism. Energy Intake. Humans. Middle Aged. Nutritional Requirements. Respiration, Artificial. Rest. Retrospective Studies. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 16517949.001).
  • [ISSN] 0148-6071
  • [Journal-full-title] JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. ||||...... 41%  Spencer AU, Neaga A, West B, Safran J, Brown P, Btaiche I, Kuzma-O'Reilly B, Teitelbaum DH: Pediatric short bowel syndrome: redefining predictors of success. Ann Surg; 2005 Sep;242(3):403-9; discussion 409-12
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  • [Title] Pediatric short bowel syndrome: redefining predictors of success.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine predictors of survival and of weaning off parenteral nutrition (PN) in pediatric short bowel syndrome (SBS) patients.
  • SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Pediatric SBS carries extensive morbidity and high mortality, but factors believed to predict survival or weaning from PN have been based on limited studies.
  • This study reviews outcomes of a large number of SBS infants and identifies predictors of success.
  • METHODS: Multivariate Cox proportional hazards analysis was conducted on 80 pediatric SBS patients.
  • Primary outcome was survival; secondary outcome was ability to wean off PN.
  • Nonsignificant covariates were eliminated.
  • P < 0.05 was considered significant.
  • RESULTS: Over a mean of 5.1 years of follow-up, survival was 58 of 80 (72.5%) and 51 weaned off PN (63.8%).
  • Cholestasis (conjugated bilirubin > or =2.5 mg/dL) was the strongest predictor of mortality (relative risk [RR] 22.7, P = 0.005).
  • Although absolute small bowel length was only slightly predictive, percentage of normal bowel length (for a given infant's gestational age) was strongly predictive of mortality (if <10% of normal length, RR of death was 5.7, P = 0.003) and of weaning PN (if > or =10% of normal, RR of weaning PN was 11.8, P = 0.001).
  • Presence of the ileocecal valve (ICV) also strongly predicted weaning PN (RR 3.9, P < 0.0005); however, ICV was not predictive of survival.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Cholestasis and age-adjusted small bowel length are the major predictors of mortality in pediatric SBS.
  • Age-adjusted small bowel length and ICV are the major predictors of weaning from PN.
  • These data permit better prediction of outcomes of pediatric SBS, which may help to direct future management of these challenging patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena. Parenteral Nutrition. Short Bowel Syndrome / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child, Preschool. Cholestasis / etiology. Cholestasis / mortality. Female. Humans. Infant. Male. Organ Size / drug effects. Prognosis. Retrospective Studies. Survival Analysis


34. ||||...... 41%  Grüschow S, Chang LC, Mao Y, Sherman DH: Hydroxyquinone O-methylation in mitomycin biosynthesis. J Am Chem Soc; 2007 May 23;129(20):6470-6
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  • [Title] Hydroxyquinone O-methylation in mitomycin biosynthesis.
  • Mitomycins are bioreductively activated DNA-alkylating agents.
  • One member of this family, mitomycin C, is in clinical use as part of combination therapy for certain solid tumors.
  • The cytotoxicity displayed by mitomycins is dependent on their electrochemical potential which, in turn, is governed in part by the substituents of the quinone moiety.
  • In this paper we describe studies on the biogenesis of the quinone methoxy group present in mitomycins A and B.
  • An engineered Streptomyces lavendulae strain in which the mmcR methyltransferase gene had been deleted failed to produce the three mitomycins (A, B, and C) that are typically isolated from the wild type organism.
  • Analysis of the culture extracts from the mmcR-deletion mutant strain revealed that two new metabolites, 7-demethylmitomycin A and 7-demethylmitomycin B, had accumulated instead.
  • Production of mitomycins A and C or mitomycin B was selectively restored upon supplementing the culture medium of a S. lavendulae strain unable to produce the key precursor 3-amino-5-hydroxybenzoate with either 7-demethylmitomycin A or 7-demethylmitomycin B, respectively.
  • MmcR methyltransferase obtained by cloning and overexpression of the corresponding mmcR gene was shown to catalyze the 7-O-methylation of both C9beta- and C9alpha-configured 7-hydroxymitomycins in vitro.
  • This study provides direct evidence for the catalytic role of MmcR in formation of the 7-OMe group that is characteristic of mitomycins A and B and demonstrates the prerequisite of 7-O-methylation for the production of the clinical agent mitomycin C.
  • [MeSH-major] Mitomycins / biosynthesis. Mitomycins / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Catalysis. Methylation. Methyltransferases / genetics. Methyltransferases / metabolism. Molecular Structure. Mutation / genetics. Streptomyces / genetics. Streptomyces / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 17461583.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-7863
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Chemical Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Chem. Soc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 81172
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Mitomycins; 4055-39-4 / mitomycin A; EC 2.1.1.- / Methyltransferases
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35. ||||...... 41%  Wang Y, Novotny M, Quaiserová-Mocko V, Swain GM, Wang DH: TRPV1-mediated protection against endotoxin-induced hypotension and mortality in rats. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol; 2008 May;294(5):R1517-23
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  • [Title] TRPV1-mediated protection against endotoxin-induced hypotension and mortality in rats.
  • This study was designed to test the hypothesis that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel, expressed primarily in sensory nerves, and substance P (SP), released by sensory nerves, play a protective role against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced hypotension.
  • LPS (10 mg/kg iv) elicited tachycardia and hypotension in anesthetized male Wistar rats, which peaked at 10 min and gradually recovered 1 h after the injection.
  • Blockade of TRPV1 with its selective antagonist capsazepine (CAPZ, 3 mg/kg iv) impaired recovery given that the fall in mean arterial pressure (MAP) was greater 1 h after CAPZ plus LPS injections compared with LPS injection alone (45 +/- 5 vs. 25 +/- 4 mmHg, P < 0.05).
  • Blockade of the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor with its selective antagonists RP-67580 (5 mg/kg iv) or L-733,060 (4 mg/kg iv) prevented recovery, considering that falls in MAP were not different 1 h after injections of NK1 antagonists plus LPS from their peak decreases (66 +/- 9 vs. 74 +/- 5 mmHg or 60 +/- 7 vs. 69 +/- 3 mmHg, respectively, P > 0.05).
  • LPS increased plasma SP, norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (Epi) levels compared with vehicles, and the increases in plasma SP, NE, and Epi were significantly inhibited by CAPZ or RP-67580.
  • The survival rate at 24 or 48 h after LPS injection (20 mg/kg ip) was lower in conscious rats pretreated with CAPZ or RP-67580 compared with rats treated with LPS alone (P < 0.05).
  • Thus our results show that the TRPV1, possibly via triggering release of SP which activates the NK1 and stimulates the sympathetic axis, plays a protective role against endotoxin-induced hypotension and mortality, suggesting that TRPV1 receptors are essential in protecting vital organ perfusion and survival during the endotoxic condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Endotoxins / toxicity. Hypotension / chemically induced. Hypotension / prevention & control. TRPV Cation Channels / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure / drug effects. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Catecholamines / blood. Heart Rate / drug effects. Isoindoles / pharmacology. Lipopolysaccharides / toxicity. Male. Neurons, Afferent / drug effects. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Receptors, Neurokinin-1 / physiology. Substance P / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 18337316.001).
  • [ISSN] 0363-6119
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK 67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL 73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Catecholamines; 0 / Endotoxins; 0 / Isoindoles; 0 / Lipopolysaccharides; 0 / Receptors, Neurokinin-1; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / Trpv1 protein, rat; 135911-02-3 / 7,7-diphenyl-2-(1-imino-2-(2-methoxyphenyl)ethyl)perhydroisoindol-4-one; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; LFW48MY844 / capsazepine; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96819; NLM/ PMC2668825
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36. ||||...... 41%  Hamer DH, Singh MP, Wylie BJ, Yeboah-Antwi K, Tuchman J, Desai M, Udhayakumar V, Gupta P, Brooks MI, Shukla MM, Awasthy K, Sabin L, MacLeod WB, Dash AP, Singh N: Burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand State, India. Malar J; 2009;8:210
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  • [Title] Burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand State, India.
  • BACKGROUND: Past studies in India included only symptomatic pregnant women and thus may have overestimated the proportion of women with malaria.
  • Given the large population at risk, a cross sectional study was conducted in order to better define the burden of malaria in pregnancy in Jharkhand, a malaria-endemic state in central-east India.
  • METHODS: Cross-sectional surveys at antenatal clinics and delivery units were performed over a 12-month period at two district hospitals in urban and semi-urban areas, and a rural mission hospital.
  • Malaria was diagnosed by Giemsa-stained blood smear and/or rapid diagnostic test using peripheral or placental blood.
  • RESULTS: 2,386 pregnant women were enrolled at the antenatal clinics and 718 at the delivery units.
  • 1.8% (43/2382) of the antenatal clinic cohort had a positive diagnostic test for malaria (53.5% Plasmodium falciparum, 37.2% Plasmodium vivax, and 9.3% mixed infections).
  • Peripheral parasitaemia was more common in pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in rural sites (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 4.31, 95%CI 1.84-10.11) and in those who were younger than 20 years (aRR 2.68, 95%CI 1.03-6.98).
  • Among delivery unit participants, 1.7% (12/717) had peripheral parasitaemia and 2.4% (17/712) had placental parasitaemia.
  • Women attending delivery units were more likely to be parasitaemic if they were in their first or second pregnancy (aRR 3.17, 95%CI 1.32-7.61), had fever in the last week (aRR 5.34, 95%CI 2.89-9.90), or had rural residence (aRR 3.10, 95%CI 1.66-5.79).
  • Malaria control measures including indoor residual spraying (IRS) and untreated bed nets were common, whereas insecticide-treated bed nets (ITN) and malaria chemoprophylaxis were rarely used.
  • CONCLUSION: The prevalence of malaria among pregnant women was relatively low.
  • However, given the large at-risk population in this malaria-endemic region of India, there is a need to enhance ITN availability and use for prevention of malaria in pregnancy, and to improve case management of symptomatic pregnant women.
  • [MeSH-major] Malaria, Falciparum / epidemiology. Malaria, Vivax / epidemiology. Pregnancy Complications, Infectious / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Animals. Blood / parasitology. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. India / epidemiology. Plasmodium falciparum / isolation & purification. Plasmodium vivax / isolation & purification. Pregnancy. Prevalence. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19728882.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-2875
  • [Journal-full-title] Malaria journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Malar. J.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2744702
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37. ||||...... 41%  Roh E, Park TH, Kim MI, Lee S, Ryu S, Oh CS, Rhee S, Kim DH, Park BS, Heu S: Characterization of a new bacteriocin, Carocin D, from Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2010 Nov;76(22):7541-9
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  • [Title] Characterization of a new bacteriocin, Carocin D, from Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum Pcc21.
  • Two different bacteriocins, carotovoricin and carocin S1, had been found in Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, which causes soft-rot disease in diverse plants.
  • Previously, we reported that the particular strain Pcc21, producing only one high-molecular-weight bacteriocin, carried a new antibacterial activity against the indicator strain Pcc3.
  • Here, we report that this new antibacterial activity is due to a new bacteriocin produced by strain Pcc21 and named carocin D.
  • Carocin D is encoded by the caroDK gene located in the genomic DNA together with the caroDI gene, which seems to encode an immunity protein.
  • N-terminal amino acid sequences of purified carocin D were determined by Edman degradation.
  • In comparison with the primary translation product of caroDK, it was found that 8 amino acids are missing at the N terminus.
  • This finding proved that carocin D is synthesized as a precursor peptide and that 8 amino acids are removed from its N terminus during maturation.
  • Carocin D has two putative translocation domains; the N-terminal and C-terminal domains are homologous to those of Escherichia coli colicin E3 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa S-type pyocin, respectively.
  • When caroDK and caroDI genes were transformed into carocin D-sensitive bacteria such as Pcc3, the bacteria became resistant to this bacteriocin.
  • Carocin D has one putative DNase domain at the extreme C terminus and showed DNase activity in vitro.
  • This bacteriocin had slight tolerance to heat but not to proteases.
  • The caroDK gene was present in only 5 of 54 strains of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum.
  • These results indicate that carocin D is a third bacteriocin found in P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, and this bacteriocin can be readily expressed in carocin D-sensitive nonpathogenic bacteria, which may have high potential as a biological control agent in the field.
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / isolation & purification. Bacteriocins / isolation & purification. Pectobacterium carotovorum / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. DNA, Bacterial / chemistry. DNA, Bacterial / genetics. Deoxyribonucleases / genetics. Deoxyribonucleases / isolation & purification. Deoxyribonucleases / metabolism. Genes, Bacterial. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Molecular Sequence Data. Protein Processing, Post-Translational. Sequence Alignment. Sequence Analysis, DNA. Sequence Analysis, Protein

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  • (PMID = 20870796.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] GENBANK/ GU354220
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Bacteriocins; 0 / DNA, Bacterial; EC 3.1.- / Deoxyribonucleases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2976183
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38. ||||...... 41%  Min SH, Kim MH, Seo JB, Lee JY, Lee DH: The quantitative analysis of back muscle degeneration after posterior lumbar fusion: comparison of minimally invasive and conventional open surgery. Asian Spine J; 2009 Dec;3(2):89-95
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  • PURPOSE: The results of conventional open surgery was compared with those from minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MI-TLIF) for lumbar fusion to determine which approach resulted in less postoperative paraspinal muscle degeneration.
  • OVERVIEW OF LITERATURE: MI TLIF is new surgical technique that appears to minimize iatrogenic injury.
  • There were 17 cases of conventional open surgery and 31 cases of MI-TLIF (31 cases of single segment fusion and 17 cases of multi-segment fusion).
  • RESULTS: A comparison of the traditional posterior fusion method with MI-TLIF revealed single segment fusion to result in an average increase in fat infiltration in the paraspinal muscle of 4.30% and 1.37% and a decrease in cross-sectional area of 0.10 and 0.07 before and after surgery, respectively.
  • CONCLUSIONS: A comparison of conventional open surgery with MI-TLIF upon degeneration of the paraspinal muscle with a 1 year follow-up evaluation revealed that both single and multi segment fusion showed less change in fat infiltration percentage and cross-sectional area in the MI-TLIF but there was no significant difference between the two groups.

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  • (PMID = 20404953.001).
  • [ISSN] 1976-7846
  • [Journal-full-title] Asian spine journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Asian Spine J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2852079
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Fat degeneration / MRI / Paraspainal muscle / Posterior fusion
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39. ||||...... 41%  Wang Y, Babánková D, Huang J, Swain GM, Wang DH: Deletion of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors exaggerates renal damage in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. Hypertension; 2008 Aug;52(2):264-70
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  • [Title] Deletion of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptors exaggerates renal damage in deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension.
  • To determine whether the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel provides protection against hypertension-induced renal damage, hypertension was induced by uninephrectomy and by giving deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt in wild-type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1-/-) mice.
  • Mean arterial pressure, as determined by radiotelemetry, increased significantly and reached the peak 7 days after DOCA-salt treatment in both WT and TRPV1-/- mice.
  • There was no difference in mean arterial pressure between the 2 strains at the baseline or at the peak that lasted for 4 treatment weeks.
  • DOCA-salt treatment in both WT and TRPV1-/- mice led to increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane, glomerulosclerosis, renal cortical tubulointerstitial injury, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, increased number of tubular proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells, and renal monocyte/macrophage infiltration, all of which were much more severe in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1-/- compared with DOCA-salt-treated WT mice.
  • Renal TRPV1 protein expression, but not the renal anandamide content, was elevated in DOCA-salt-treated WT compared with vehicle-treated WT mice.
  • Renal anandamide levels were markedly elevated in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1-/- but not in vehicle-treated TRPV1-/- mice.
  • Thus, our data show that ablation of the TRPV1 gene exacerbates renal damage induced by DOCA-salt hypertension, indicating that TRPV1 may constitute a protective mechanism against end-organ damage induced by hypertension.
  • [MeSH-major] Hypertension / complications. Hypertension / physiopathology. Nephrosclerosis / etiology. Nephrosclerosis / pathology. TRPV Cation Channels / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Albuminuria / diagnosis. Albuminuria / etiology. Analysis of Variance. Animals. Blotting, Western. Desoxycorticosterone. Disease Models, Animal. Glomerular Filtration Rate. Immunohistochemistry. Isoprostanes / urine. Mice. Mice, Mutant Strains. Probability. Random Allocation. Urinalysis

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  • (PMID = 18606907.001).
  • [ISSN] 1524-4563
  • [Journal-full-title] Hypertension
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Hypertension
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-06; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-05
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Isoprostanes; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / TRPV1 protein, human; 0 / vanilloid receptor subtype 1; 40GP35YQ49 / Desoxycorticosterone
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS96825; NLM/ PMC2669743
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40. ||||...... 41%  Kuo DH, Simmons FJ, Blair S, Hart E, Rose JB, Xagoraraki I: Assessment of human adenovirus removal in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater. Water Res; 2010 Mar;44(5):1520-30
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  • [Title] Assessment of human adenovirus removal in a full-scale membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.
  • Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) in wastewater samples taken from four different treatment stages of a full-scale municipal wastewater treatment plant (i.e., incoming raw sewage, primary sedimentation effluent, membrane bioreactor (MBR) influent, and MBR effluent) were quantified by real-time PCR assays to further estimate removal efficiency of the HAdvs. Based on hexon gene sequence comparisons, HAdV species A, C, and F were consistently found in the wastewater samples.
  • In general, all three identified HAdV species were detected in most of the wastewater samples using the real-time PCR assays.
  • Overall HAdV concentrations were rather stable over the entire 8-month study period (January-August, 2008) (approximately 10(6)-10(7)viral particles/L of wastewater for the raw sewage and primary effluent; 10(8)-10(9)viral particles/L for the MBR influent; and, 10(3)-10(4)viral particles/L for the MBR effluent).
  • No significant seasonal differences were noticed for the HAdV abundances.
  • Removal efficiencies of the viral particles in the full-scale MBR process were assessed and showed an average HAdV removal of 5.0+/-0.6logs over the study period.
  • The removal efficiencies for F species (average log removal of 6.5+/-1.3logs) were typically higher (p-value <0.05) than those of the other two species (average of 4.1+/-0.9 and 4.6+/-0.5logs for species A and C, respectively).
  • These results demonstrate that the full-scale MBR system efficiently removed most HAdV from the wastewater leaving about 10(3)viral particles/L in the MBR effluent.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenoviruses, Human / isolation & purification. Bioreactors / virology. Cities. Membranes, Artificial. Waste Disposal, Fluid / instrumentation. Water Purification / instrumentation
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Phylogeny. Sewage / virology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.
  • (PMID = 19944439.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-2448
  • [Journal-full-title] Water research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Water Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Membranes, Artificial; 0 / Sewage
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41. ||||...... 41%  Spencer AU, Sun X, El-Sawaf M, Haxhija EQ, Brei D, Luntz J, Yang H, Teitelbaum DH: Enterogenesis in a clinically feasible model of mechanical small-bowel lengthening. Surgery; 2006 Aug;140(2):212-20
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  • [Title] Enterogenesis in a clinically feasible model of mechanical small-bowel lengthening.
  • BACKGROUND: Recent work indicates that mechanical force induces small-bowel growth, although methods reported do not have direct clinical application.
  • We report a clinically feasible technique of enterogenesis and describe intestinal function in this model.
  • METHODS: Using a pig model (n = 11), we stretched isolated small intestinal segments mechanically for 7 days in vivo with an intraluminal device.
  • Control segments were not stretched.
  • Morphology, histology, and epithelial proliferation were assessed.
  • Absorption and epithelial barrier function were examined in an Ussing chamber.
  • RESULTS: Stretch segments were significantly longer than Control segments and had nearly 2-fold greater surface area (P < .001).
  • Mucosal thickness was much greater in Stretch than Control segments (772 +/- 134 vs. 647 +/- 75 microm, P = .02).
  • Although villus height was reduced in Stretch and Control segments (353 +/- 76 vs. 324 +/- 76 microm, P = .6) versus native jejunum (522 +/- 87, P < .0005), crypt depth was increased dramatically in Stretch (450 +/- 95 microm) versus Control segments (341 +/- 64, P = .005).
  • This observation was accompanied by a 2-fold increase in cellular proliferation (26.3 +/- 3.8 vs 12.1 +/- 6.6 % bromodeoxyuridine+, P < .05).
  • Barrier function was intact ([3H]-mannitol permeation, 0.16 +/- 0.08%, vs native jejunum, 0.17 +/- 0.08%, P = .81).
  • Glucose-mediated sodium transport was similar in Stretch versus native jejunum segments (60.0 +/- 23.5 vs 82.3 +/- 47.3 microA/cm2, P = .31), as was carbachol-induced chloride transport (82.4 +/- 72.2 vs 57.2 +/- 33.4 microA/cm2, P = .54) and alanine absorption (16.46 +/- 12.94 vs 23.53 +/- 21.31 microA/cm2, P = .53).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Mechanical stretching induces small intestinal growth, while maintaining function.
  • Epithelial architecture does change, such that a decrease in villus height is offset by a marked increase in crypt depth and a 2-fold increase in epithelial proliferation.
  • Epithelial barrier and absorptive functions remain intact.
  • The device described may have direct clinical applicability.
  • [MeSH-major] Jejunum / growth & development. Stress, Mechanical. Tissue Expansion Devices
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Equipment Design. Feasibility Studies. Female. Intestinal Absorption / physiology. Models, Animal. Swine. Tensile Strength

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  • (PMID = 16904972.001).
  • [ISSN] 0039-6060
  • [Journal-full-title] Surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Surgery
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS15554; NLM/ PMC1764912
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42. ||||...... 41%  Kostianev SS, Hodgev VA, Iluchev DH: Multidimensional system for assessment of COPD patients. Comparison with BODE index. Folia Med (Plovdiv); 2008 Oct-Dec;50(4):29-38
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  • The letters of the abbreviation stand for the following: D--dyspnea, O--obstruction, RE--rate of exacerbation, MI--movement (exercise) intolerance, B--Body Mass Index, OX--blood oxygen disturbances.

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  • (PMID = 19209528.001).
  • [ISSN] 0204-8043
  • [Journal-full-title] Folia medica
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Folia Med (Plovdiv)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Bulgaria
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43. ||||...... 41%  Wang Y, Kaminski NE, Wang DH: Endocannabinoid regulates blood pressure via activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 in Wistar rats fed a high-salt diet. J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 2007 May;321(2):763-9
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  • [Title] Endocannabinoid regulates blood pressure via activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 in Wistar rats fed a high-salt diet.
  • This study was designed to examine the role of the endocannabinoids in blood pressure regulation during high sodium (HS) intake.
  • HS (4% Na+ by weight) intake for 3 weeks increased baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, mm Hg) compared with normal sodium (NS, 0.4% Na+ by weight)-treated male Wistar rats.
  • Capsazepine (3 mg/kg), a selective transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) antagonist, caused a greater increase in MAP (mm Hg) in HS-treated compared with NS-treated rats (13+/-3 versus 4+/-2, p<0.05), whereas calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) dose-dependently decreased MAP in both HS- and NS-treated rats with a more profound effect in the former.
  • HS increased plasma anandamide levels analyzed by liquid chromatography/electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (NS, 2.40+/-0.31 versus HS, 4.05+/-0.47 pmol/ml, p<0.05) and plasma CGRP levels determined by radioimmunoassay (NS, 36.6+/-3.8 versus HS, 55.7+/-6.4 pg/ml, p<0.05).
  • Methanandamide, a metabolically stable analog of anandamide, caused a greater CGRP release in mesenteric arteries isolated from HS-treated compared with NS-treated rats.
  • Western blot showed that expression of receptor activity-modifying protein 1, a subunit of the CGRP receptor, in mesenteric arteries was greater in HS-treated compared with NS-treated rats.
  • These results show that HS intake increases production of anandamide, which may serve as an endovanilloid to activate TRPV1, leading to release of CGRP to blunt salt-induced increases in blood pressure.
  • These data support the notion that TRPV1 may act as a molecular target for salt-induced elevation of endovanilloid compounds to regulate blood pressure.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Pressure. Cannabinoid Receptor Modulators / physiology. Endocannabinoids. Sodium Chloride, Dietary / administration & dosage. TRPV Cation Channels / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Arachidonic Acids / biosynthesis. Arachidonic Acids / pharmacology. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / secretion. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Hypertension / drug therapy. Male. Polyunsaturated Alkamides. Rats. Rats, Wistar

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  • (PMID = 17308041.001).
  • [ISSN] 0022-3565
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Arachidonic Acids; 0 / Cannabinoid Receptor Modulators; 0 / Endocannabinoids; 0 / Polyunsaturated Alkamides; 0 / Sodium Chloride, Dietary; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / Trpv1 protein, rat; 150314-39-9 / methanandamide; 83652-28-2 / Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; 94421-68-8 / anandamide; LFW48MY844 / capsazepine; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
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44. ||||...... 41%  Ciche TA, Kim KS, Kaufmann-Daszczuk B, Nguyen KC, Hall DH: Cell Invasion and Matricide during Photorhabdus luminescens Transmission by Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Nematodes. Appl Environ Microbiol; 2008 Apr;74(8):2275-87
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  • [Title] Cell Invasion and Matricide during Photorhabdus luminescens Transmission by Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Nematodes.
  • Many animals and plants have symbiotic relationships with beneficial bacteria.
  • Experimentally tractable models are necessary to understand the processes involved in the selective transmission of symbiotic bacteria.
  • One such model is the transmission of the insect-pathogenic bacterial symbionts Photorhabdus spp. by Heterorhabditis bacteriophora infective juvenile (IJ)-stage nematodes.
  • By observing egg-laying behavior and IJ development, it was determined that IJs develop exclusively via intrauterine hatching and matricide (i.e., endotokia matricida).
  • By transiently exposing nematodes to fluorescently labeled symbionts, it was determined that symbionts infect the maternal intestine as a biofilm and then invade and breach the rectal gland epithelium, becoming available to the IJ offspring developing in the pseudocoelom.
  • Cell- and stage-specific infection occurs again in the pre-IJ pharyngeal intestinal valve cells, which helps symbionts to persist as IJs develop and move to a new host.
  • Synchronous with nematode development are changes in symbiont and host behavior (e.g., adherence versus invasion).
  • Thus, Photorhabdus symbionts are maternally transmitted by an elaborate infectious process involving multiple selective steps in order to achieve symbiont-specific transmission.
  • [MeSH-major] Photorhabdus / growth & development. Rhabditoidea / microbiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biofilms / growth & development. Genes, Reporter. Green Fluorescent Proteins / genetics. Green Fluorescent Proteins / metabolism. Intestinal Mucosa / microbiology. Intestines / microbiology. Microscopy, Electron, Transmission. Pharynx / microbiology. Symbiosis

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  • (PMID = 18281425.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-5336
  • [Journal-full-title] Applied and environmental microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / RR 12596
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 147336-22-9 / Green Fluorescent Proteins
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2293164
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45. ||||...... 41%  Wang H, Wang DH, Galligan JJ: P2Y2 receptors mediate ATP-induced resensitization of TRPV1 expressed by kidney projecting sensory neurons. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol; 2010 Jun;298(6):R1634-41
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  • [Title] P2Y2 receptors mediate ATP-induced resensitization of TRPV1 expressed by kidney projecting sensory neurons.
  • The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel is a ligand-gated cation channel expressed by sensory nerves.
  • P2Y receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that are also expressed by TRPV1-positive sensory neurons.
  • Therefore, we studied interactions between P2Y receptors and TRPV1 function on kidney projecting sensory neurons.
  • Application of Fast Blue (FB) to nerves surrounding the renal artery retrogradely labeled neurons in dorsal root ganglia of rats.
  • Whole cell recording was performed on FB-labeled neurons maintained in primary culture.
  • Capsaicin was used to activate TRPV1.
  • Four types of kidney projecting neurons were identified based on capsaicin responses:.
  • 1) desensitizing (35%), 2) nondesensitizing (29%), 3) silent (3%), and 4) insensitive (30%).
  • Silent neurons responded to capsaicin only after ATP (100 microM) pretreatment.
  • ATP reversed desensitization in desensitizing neurons.
  • Insensitive neurons never responded to capsaicin.
  • UTP, a P2Y purinoceptor 2 (P2Y(2))/P2Y(4) receptor agonist, reversed capsaicin-induced TRPV1 desensitization.
  • 2-methyl-thio-ATP (2-Me-S-ATP), a P2Y(1) receptor agonist, did not change desensitization.
  • MRS 2179 and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), drugs that block P2Y(1) receptors, did not block ATP-induced resensitization of TRPV1.
  • Suramin, a P2Y(2) receptor antagonist, blocked resensitization caused by UTP.
  • Immunocytochemical studies showed that FB-labeled neurons coexpressed P2Y(2) receptors and TRPV1.
  • We conclude that P2Y(2) receptor activation can maintain TRPV1 function perhaps during sustained episodes of activity of kidney projecting sensory neurons.
  • [MeSH-major] Neurons / metabolism. Receptors, Purinergic P2 / metabolism. TRPV Cation Channels / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Drug Interactions. Ganglia, Spinal / cytology. Ion Channels / metabolism. Kidney / metabolism. Male. Mercaptoethanol / pharmacology. Neurons, Afferent / drug effects. Neurons, Afferent / metabolism. Neurons, Afferent / physiology. Patch-Clamp Techniques. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Receptors, Purinergic P2Y2. Sensory Receptor Cells. Suramin / pharmacology. Uridine Triphosphate / pharmacology

  • HSDB. structure - CAPSAICIN.
  • HSDB. structure - 2-MERCAPTOETHANOL.
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  • (PMID = 20335377.001).
  • [ISSN] 1522-1490
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of physiology. Regulatory, integrative and comparative physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / P01 HL70687; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01HL073287
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Ion Channels; 0 / Receptors, Purinergic P2; 0 / Receptors, Purinergic P2Y2; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / vanilloid receptor subtype 1; 60-24-2 / Mercaptoethanol; 6032D45BEM / Suramin; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin; UT0S826Z60 / Uridine Triphosphate
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2886708
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46. ||||...... 41%  Gulbakan B, Yasun E, Shukoor MI, Zhu Z, You M, Tan X, Sanchez H, Powell DH, Dai H, Tan W: A dual platform for selective analyte enrichment and ionization in mass spectrometry using aptamer-conjugated graphene oxide. J Am Chem Soc; 2010 Dec 15;132(49):17408-10
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  • [Title] A dual platform for selective analyte enrichment and ionization in mass spectrometry using aptamer-conjugated graphene oxide.
  • This study demonstrates the use of aptamer-conjugated graphene oxide as an affinity extraction and detection platform for analytes from complex biological media.
  • We have shown that cocaine and adenosine can be selectively enriched from plasma samples and that direct mass spectrometric readouts can be obtained without a matrix and with greatly improved signal-to-noise ratios.
  • Aptamer-conjugated graphene oxide has clear advantages in target enrichment and in generating highly efficient ionization of target molecules for mass spectrometry.
  • These results demonstrate the utility of the approach for analysis of small molecules in real biological samples.
  • [MeSH-major] Adenosine / isolation & purification. Aptamers, Nucleotide / chemistry. Cocaine / isolation & purification. Graphite / chemistry. Oxides / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Mass Spectrometry / methods. Signal-To-Noise Ratio

  • HSDB. structure - COCAINE.
  • HSDB. structure - Adenosine.
  • HSDB. structure - GRAPHITE.
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  • (PMID = 21090719.001).
  • [ISSN] 1520-5126
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Chemical Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Am. Chem. Soc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM079359; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM079359-01; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM079359-01S1; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM079359-02; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM079359-03; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM079359-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Aptamers, Nucleotide; 0 / Oxides; 7782-42-5 / Graphite; I5Y540LHVR / Cocaine; K72T3FS567 / Adenosine
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47. ||||...... 41%  Li MH, Ung PM, Zajkowski J, Garneau-Tsodikova S, Sherman DH: Automated genome mining for natural products. BMC Bioinformatics; 2009;10:185
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  • [Title] Automated genome mining for natural products.
  • BACKGROUND: Discovery of new medicinal agents from natural sources has largely been an adventitious process based on screening of plant and microbial extracts combined with bioassay-guided identification and natural product structure elucidation.
  • Increasingly rapid and more cost-effective genome sequencing technologies coupled with advanced computational power have converged to transform this trend toward a more rational and predictive pursuit.
  • RESULTS: We have developed a rapid method of scanning genome sequences for multiple polyketide, nonribosomal peptide, and mixed combination natural products with output in a text format that can be readily converted to two and three dimensional structures using conventional software.
  • Our open-source and web-based program can assemble various small molecules composed of twenty standard amino acids and twenty two other chain-elongation intermediates used in nonribosomal peptide systems, and four acyl-CoA extender units incorporated into polyketides by reading a hidden Markov model of DNA.
  • This process evaluates and selects the substrate specificities along the assembly line of nonribosomal synthetases and modular polyketide synthases.
  • CONCLUSION: Using this approach we have predicted the structures of natural products from a diverse range of bacteria based on a limited number of signature sequences.
  • In accelerating direct DNA to metabolomic analysis, this method bridges the interface between chemists and biologists and enables rapid scanning for compounds with potential therapeutic value.
  • [MeSH-major] Biological Products / chemistry. Computational Biology / methods. Genome
  • [MeSH-minor] Internet. Macrolides / chemistry

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  • (PMID = 19531248.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2105
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC bioinformatics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Bioinformatics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / GM076477
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Biological Products; 0 / Macrolides
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2712472
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48. ||||...... 41%  Kang SJ, Lee EY, Song JK, Do KH, Seo JB, Lim TH, Song JM, Kang DH, Kim YH, Lee CW, Hong MK, Park SW, Park SJ: Assessment of papillary muscle function in patients with inferior wall myocardial infarction using Doppler tissue imaging. J Am Soc Echocardiogr; 2005 Aug;18(8):815-20
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  • OBJECTIVES: We sought to assess the relationship between infarct status and systolic contractile function of papillary muscle (PM) for patients with inferior wall myocardial infarction (MI).
  • METHODS: Peak systolic velocity (V) of posteromedial PM, systolic strain (epsilon) of posteromedial PM (epsilonPM), V of adjacent inferior wall, and of adjacent inferior wall (epsilonW) were calculated from color Doppler tissue imaging images obtained at apical views in 25 patients with inferior MI and in 13 healthy control subjects.
  • All 25 patients with MI underwent magnetic resonance imaging to assess the infarct status of PM.
  • RESULTS: Compared with the control subjects, patients with MI had significantly lower V of adjacent inferior wall (5.0 +/- 0.8 vs 4.4 +/- 1.1 cm/s, P = .049) and V of posteromedial PM (4.9 +/- 0.8 vs 4.0 +/- 1.2 cm/s, P = .005), and less systolic deformation, as demonstrated by epsilonW (-17 +/- 3 vs -6 +/- 5%, P < .001) and epsilonPM (-24 +/- 5 vs -11 +/- 6%, P < .001).
  • There was a weak positive correlation between epsilonW and epsilonPM (r = 0.393, P = .052) for patients with MI.
  • CONCLUSIONS: In patients with inferior wall MI, infarct status of the PM is variable and determines its systolic contractile function, which can be quantified by epsilon measurement using Doppler tissue imaging.

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  • (PMID = 16084333.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6795
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography : official publication of the American Society of Echocardiography
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Am Soc Echocardiogr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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49. ||||...... 41%  Carlson PE Jr, Dixon SD, Janes BK, Carr KA, Nusca TD, Anderson EC, Keene SE, Sherman DH, Hanna PC: Genetic analysis of petrobactin transport in Bacillus anthracis. Mol Microbiol; 2010 Feb;75(4):900-9
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  • [Title] Genetic analysis of petrobactin transport in Bacillus anthracis.
  • Iron acquisition mechanisms play an important role in the pathogenesis of many infectious microbes.
  • In Bacillus anthracis, the siderophore petrobactin is required for both growth in iron-depleted conditions and for full virulence of the bacterium.
  • Here we demonstrate the roles of two putative petrobactin binding proteins FatB and FpuA (encoded by GBAA5330 and GBAA4766 respectively) in B. anthracis iron acquisition and pathogenesis.
  • Markerless deletion mutants were created using allelic exchange.
  • The Delta fatB strain was capable of wild-type levels of growth in iron-depleted conditions, indicating that FatB does not play an essential role in petrobactin uptake.
  • In contrast, Delta fpuA bacteria exhibited a significant decrease in growth under low-iron conditions when compared with wild-type bacteria.
  • This mutant could not be rescued by the addition of exogenous purified petrobactin.
  • Further examination of this strain demonstrated increased levels of petrobactin accumulation in the culture supernatants, suggesting no defect in siderophore synthesis or export but, instead, an inability of Delta fpuA to import this siderophore.
  • Delta fpuA spores were also significantly attenuated in a murine model of inhalational anthrax.
  • These results provide the first genetic evidence demonstrating the role of FpuA in petrobactin uptake.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacillus anthracis / genetics. Bacillus anthracis / metabolism. Bacterial Proteins / metabolism. Benzamides / metabolism. Carrier Proteins / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Anthrax / microbiology. Iron / metabolism. Mice. Mice, Inbred DBA. Siderophores / metabolism. Virulence. Virulence Factors / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 20487286.001).
  • [ISSN] 1365-2958
  • [Journal-full-title] Molecular microbiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Mol. Microbiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 1-U54-AI-057053; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / T32-AI07528; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U54 AI057153; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / U54 AI057153-05S10015
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bacterial Proteins; 0 / Benzamides; 0 / Carrier Proteins; 0 / Siderophores; 0 / Virulence Factors; 0 / petrobactin; E1UOL152H7 / Iron
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS221984; NLM/ PMC2917102
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50. ||||...... 41%  Moore KS, Porter CB, Weissman DH: Made you look! Consciously perceived, irrelevant instructional cues can hijack the attentional network. Neuroimage; 2009 May 15;46(1):270-9
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  • [Title] Made you look! Consciously perceived, irrelevant instructional cues can hijack the attentional network.
  • Functional neuroimaging studies of endogenous cued attention suggest that a fronto-parietal attentional network keeps track of current task objectives in working memory and enhances activity in posterior sensory regions that underlie the perceptual processing of behaviorally relevant stimuli.
  • Relatively little is known, however, about whether consciously perceived, irrelevant instructional cues can hijack the attentional network, leading to an enhancement of the perceptual processing of irrelevant stimuli.
  • Using a cross-modal attentional cueing task in combination with functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that such irrelevant cues can indeed hijack the attentional network, as indexed by increased activity in (a) frontal regions that control attention and (b) sensory cortices that underlie the perceptual processing of task-irrelevant stimuli.
  • Furthermore, we found that in left ventrolateral (but not dorsolateral) prefrontal regions, the magnitude of this increased activity varies with whether an irrelevant instructional cue is presented simultaneously with (versus after) a relevant instructional cue.
  • These findings show that consciously perceived, irrelevant instructional cues can activate inappropriate task objectives in working memory, resulting in a hijacking of the attentional network.
  • Moreover, they reveal different time courses of hijacking effects in ventrolateral and dorsolateral prefrontal regions, consistent with models in which these regions make distinct contributions to cognitive control.
  • [MeSH-major] Attention / physiology. Brain / physiology. Cues
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Female. Humans. Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Memory, Short-Term / physiology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19457372.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-9572
  • [Journal-full-title] NeuroImage
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neuroimage
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / 1R03DA021345-01; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / R03 DA021345-01
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS99858; NLM/ PMC2686060
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51. ||||...... 41%  Severson WE, McDowell M, Ananthan S, Chung DH, Rasmussen L, Sosa MI, White EL, Noah J, Jonsson CB: High-throughput screening of a 100,000-compound library for inhibitors of influenza A virus (H3N2). J Biomol Screen; 2008 Oct;13(9):879-87
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  • [Title] High-throughput screening of a 100,000-compound library for inhibitors of influenza A virus (H3N2).
  • Using a highly reproducible and robust cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) assay, the authors screened a 100,000-compound library at 14- and 114-microM compound concentration against influenza strain A/Udorn/72 (H3N2).
  • The "hit" rates (>50% inhibition of the viral cytopathic effect) from the 14- and 114-microM screens were 0.022% and 0.38%, respectively.
  • The hits were evaluated for their antiviral activity, cell toxicity, and selectivity in dose-response experiments.
  • The screen at the lower concentration yielded 3 compounds, which displayed moderate activity (SI(50) = 10-49).
  • Intriguingly, the screen at the higher concentration revealed several additional hits.
  • Two of these hits were highly active with an SI(50) > 50.
  • Time of addition experiments revealed 1 compound that inhibited early and 4 other compounds that inhibited late in the virus life cycle, suggesting they affect entry and replication, respectively.
  • The active compounds represent several different classes of molecules such as carboxanilides, 1-benzoyl-3-arylthioureas, sulfonamides, and benzothiazinones, which have not been previously identified as having antiviral/anti-influenza activity.
  • [MeSH-major] Antiviral Agents / pharmacology. Drug Evaluation, Preclinical / methods. Influenza A Virus, H3N2 Subtype / chemistry
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Automation. Cell Line. Chemistry, Pharmaceutical / methods. Dogs. Drug Design. Inhibitory Concentration 50. Models, Chemical. Ribavirin / pharmacology. Virus Replication / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 18812571.001).
  • [ISSN] 1087-0571
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of biomolecular screening
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Biomol Screen
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01 AI015449; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01-AI-15449; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / N01-AI-30047
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Antiviral Agents; 49717AWG6K / Ribavirin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS153445; NLM/ PMC2782602
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52. ||||...... 41%  Koga H, Yang H, Haxhija EQ, Teitelbaum DH: The role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor on intestinal epithelial cells following small bowel resection in a mouse model. Pediatr Surg Int; 2008 Dec;24(12):1279-86
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  • [Title] The role of angiotensin II type 1a receptor on intestinal epithelial cells following small bowel resection in a mouse model.
  • AIM: We have previously shown that inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) significantly reduced intestinal epithelial cell (EC) apoptosis and improved morphometric intestinal adaptation in a mouse model of massive small-bowel resection (SBR).
  • This study attempted to further examine the downstream signaling factors in this system by blocking the action of angiotensin II (ATII), hypothesizing that this would lead to similar improvement of intestinal adaptation after SBR.
  • METHOD: Two groups of mice (C57BL/6J) underwent either a 60% mid-intestinal resection (SBR group) or a transection/re-anastomosis (Sham group).
  • Because real-time PCR studies showed that only ATII receptor type 1a (ATII-1a) expression was significantly increased after SBR, compared to SHAM mice, we decided to use the specific ATII-1a receptor antagonist Losartan to block this signaling pathway.
  • An additional two groups of mice received daily i.p. injections of Losartan (SBR + Losartan and Sham + Losartan group).
  • At 7 days, the adaptive response was assessed in the remnant gut including villus height, crypt depth, EC apoptosis (TUNEL staining) and proliferation (BrdU incorporation).
  • The apoptotic and proliferation signaling pathways were addressed by analysis of EC mRNA expression.
  • RESULT: SBR (with and without Losartan) led to a significant increase in villus height and crypt depth.
  • Losartan treatment did not significantly change EC proliferation, but did significantly reduce EC apoptosis rates as compared to the non-treated SBR group.
  • Losartan treatment was associated with a significant reduction of the bax-to-bcl-2 ratio and TNF-alpha expression after SBR compared to non-treated groups.
  • Interestingly, Losartan-treated groups showed a tremendous increase in proliferation of signaling factors EGFR, KGFR and IL7R, which may indicate an expanded potential for further intestinal adaptation also beyond 7 days after SBR.
  • CONCLUSION: This study showed that the ATII-1a receptor may be of crucial importance for the modulation of intestinal EC apoptosis, and for regulating the post-resectional EC adaptive response.
  • [MeSH-major] Epithelial Cells / physiology. Intestine, Small / drug effects. Intestine, Small / physiology. Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adaptation, Physiological / drug effects. Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers / pharmacology. Animals. Apoptosis / drug effects. Cell Proliferation / drug effects. Intestinal Mucosa / drug effects. Intestinal Mucosa / physiology. Losartan / pharmacology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Models, Animal. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 18989682.001).
  • [ISSN] 0179-0358
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric surgery international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Surg. Int.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 2R01-AI044076-10; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-08; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-09; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / R01 AI044076-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] Germany
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Angiotensin II Type 1 Receptor Blockers; 0 / Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1; JMS50MPO89 / Losartan
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS169214; NLM/ PMC2814528
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53. ||||...... 41%  Hashish M, Raghavan S, Somara S, Gilmont RR, Miyasaka E, Bitar KN, Teitelbaum DH: Surgical implantation of a bioengineered internal anal sphincter. J Pediatr Surg; 2010 Jan;45(1):52-8
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  • [Title] Surgical implantation of a bioengineered internal anal sphincter.
  • PURPOSE: Fecal incontinence is a common disorder that can have devastating social and psychologic consequences.
  • However, there are no long-term ideal solutions for such patients.
  • Although loss of continence is multifactorial, the integrity of the internal anal sphincter (IAS) has particular significance.
  • We previously described the development of 3-dimensional bioengineered constructs using isolated smooth muscle tissue from donor C57BL/6 IAS.
  • We hypothesized that the bioengineered ring constructs would retain cellular viability and promote neovascularization upon implantation into a recipient mouse.
  • METHODS: Internal anal sphincter ring constructs were surgically implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice and treated with either fibroblastic growth factor 2 (0.26 microg daily) or saline controls using a microosmotic pump.
  • Internal anal sphincter constructs were harvested after 25 days (range, 23-26 days) and assessed morphologically and for tissue viability.
  • RESULT: Gross morphology showed that there was no rejection.
  • Rings showed muscle attachment to the back of the mouse with no sign of inflammation.
  • Fibroblastic growth factor 2 infusion resulted in a significantly improved histologic score and muscle viability compared with the control group.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Three-dimensional bioengineered IAS rings can be successfully implanted into the subcutaneous tissue of recipient mice.
  • The addition of fibroblastic growth factor 2 led to improved muscle viability, vascularity, and survival.
  • This approach may become a feasible option for patients with fecal incontinence.
  • [MeSH-major] Anal Canal / surgery. Prosthesis Implantation / methods. Tissue Engineering / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomedical Engineering. Cells, Cultured. Disease Models, Animal. Fecal Incontinence / surgery. Female. Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 / therapeutic use. Humans. Manometry. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Muscle, Smooth / cytology. Muscle, Smooth / surgery. Myocytes, Smooth Muscle / physiology. Prosthesis Design. Tissue Culture Techniques

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 20105579.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-5037
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of pediatric surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr. Surg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 2R01DK042876; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5 P03 CA46592; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / 5R01DK071614; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK071614; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK071614-04
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 103107-01-3 / Fibroblast Growth Factor 2
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS255019; NLM/ PMC3018766
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54. ||||...... 41%  Siri JG, Wilson ML, Murray S, Rosen DH, Vulule JM, Slutsker L, Lindblade KA: Significance of travel to rural areas as a risk factor for malarial anemia in an urban setting. Am J Trop Med Hyg; 2010 Mar;82(3):391-7
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  • [Title] Significance of travel to rural areas as a risk factor for malarial anemia in an urban setting.
  • The epidemiology of malaria in urban environments is poorly characterized, yet increasingly problematic.
  • We conducted an unmatched case-control study of risk factors for malarial anemia with high parasitemia in urban Kisumu, Kenya, from June 2002 through February 2003.
  • Cases (n = 80) were hospital patients with a hemoglobin level < or = 8 g/dL and a Plasmodium parasite density > or = 10,000/microL.
  • Controls (n = 826) were healthy respondents to a concurrent citywide knowledge, attitude, and practice survey.
  • Children who reported spending at least one night per month in a rural area were especially at risk (35% of cases; odds ratio = 9.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.4-19.7, P < 0.0001), and use of mosquito coils, bed net ownership, and house construction were non-significant, potentially indicating that malaria exposure during rural travel comprises an important element of risk.
  • Control of severe malaria in an urban setting may be complicated by Plasmodium infections acquired elsewhere.
  • Epidemiologic studies of urban malaria in low transmission settings should take travel history into account.
  • [MeSH-major] Malaria / epidemiology. Rural Population. Travel. Urban Population
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Child. Child, Preschool. Humans. Infant. Kenya. Logistic Models. Odds Ratio. Risk Factors

  • Genetic Alliance. consumer health - Anemia.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Malaria.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Rural Health Concerns.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Traveler's Health.
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  • (PMID = 20207862.001).
  • [ISSN] 1476-1645
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2829898
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55. ||||...... 41%  Li S, Chaulagain MR, Knauff AR, Podust LM, Montgomery J, Sherman DH: Selective oxidation of carbolide C-H bonds by an engineered macrolide P450 mono-oxygenase. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A; 2009 Nov 3;106(44):18463-8
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  • [Title] Selective oxidation of carbolide C-H bonds by an engineered macrolide P450 mono-oxygenase.
  • Regio- and stereoselective oxidation of an unactivated C-H bond remains a central challenge in organic chemistry.
  • Considerable effort has been devoted to identifying transition metal complexes, biological catalysts, or simplified mimics, but limited success has been achieved.
  • Cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenases are involved in diverse types of regio- and stereoselective oxidations, and represent a promising biocatalyst to address this challenge.
  • The application of this class of enzymes is particularly significant if their substrate spectra can be broadened, selectivity controlled, and reactions catalyzed in the absence of expensive heterologous redox partners.
  • In this study, we engineered a macrolide biosynthetic P450 mono-oxygenase PikC (PikC(D50N)-RhFRED) with remarkable substrate flexibility, significantly increased activity compared to wild-type enzyme, and self-sufficiency.
  • By harnessing its unique desosamine-anchoring functionality via a heretofore under-explored "substrate engineering" strategy, we demonstrated the ability of PikC to hydroxylate a series of carbocyclic rings linked to the desosamine glycoside via an acetal linkage (referred to as "carbolides") in a regioselective manner.
  • Complementary analysis of a number of high-resolution enzyme-substrate cocrystal structures provided significant insights into the function of the aminosugar-derived anchoring group for control of reaction site selectivity.
  • Moreover, unexpected biological activity of a select number of these carbolide systems revealed their potential as a previously unrecorded class of antibiotics.
  • [MeSH-major] Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System / metabolism. Macrolides / metabolism. Protein Engineering
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Sugars / pharmacology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Bacteria / drug effects. Binding Sites. Biocatalysis / drug effects. Chromatography, Liquid. Cycloparaffins / chemistry. Enzyme Assays. Hydroxylation / drug effects. Mass Spectrometry. Oxidation-Reduction / drug effects. Static Electricity. Stereoisomerism. Streptomyces / drug effects. Streptomyces / enzymology. Substrate Specificity / drug effects

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  • (PMID = 19833867.001).
  • [ISSN] 1091-6490
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Databank-accession-numbers] PDB/ 2WHW/ 2WI9
  • [Grant] United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM057014; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM078553; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM078553-03; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM57014; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01GM078553
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amino Sugars; 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Cycloparaffins; 0 / Macrolides; 5779-39-5 / desosamine; 9035-51-2 / Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System; EC 1.14.- / PikC cytochrome P450 hydroxylase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2774028
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56. ||||...... 41%  Li J, Wang DH: Increased GFR and renal excretory function by activation of TRPV1 in the isolated perfused kidney. Pharmacol Res; 2008 Mar;57(3):239-46
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  • [Title] Increased GFR and renal excretory function by activation of TRPV1 in the isolated perfused kidney.
  • To test the hypothesis that activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels leads to natriuresis and diuresis via an increase in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), recirculating Krebs-Henseleit buffer added with inulin was perfused in the isolated perfused kidney of male Wistar rat at a constant flow, and perfusion pressures (PPs) were pre-adjusted to three different levels ( approximately 100, approximately 150, and approximately 190mmHg) with phenylephrine.
  • Capsaicin (Cap), a selective TRPV1 agonist, was perfused in the presence or absence of capsazepine (Capz), a selective TRPV1 antagonist, CGRP(8-37), a selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, or spantide II (Spa), a selective substance P (SP) receptor antagonist.
  • At the higher (150 and 190mmHg) but not baseline (100mmHg) PP levels, Cap at 10microM significantly decreased PP and increased GFR, urine flow rate (UFR) and Na+ excretion (UNaV).
  • At the highest (190mmHg) PP level, Cap (2, 10, 30microM) dose-dependently decreased PP and increased GFR, UFR, UNaV, and the release of CGRP and SP.
  • Capz or CGRP(8-37) combined with Spa fully blocked the effect of Cap on PP, GFR, UFR, UNaV, and the release of CGRP and SP.
  • In conclusion, activation of TRPV1 in the isolated kidney decreases renal PP and increases GFR and water/sodium excretion possibly via simultaneous activation of CGRP and SP receptors upon their enhanced release, suggesting that TRPV1 plays a key role in modulating renal hemodynamics and excretory function.
  • [MeSH-major] Glomerular Filtration Rate / drug effects. Glomerular Filtration Rate / physiology. Kidney / drug effects. Kidney / metabolism. TRPV Cation Channels / agonists
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Blood Pressure / physiology. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / pharmacology. Capsaicin / analogs & derivatives. Capsaicin / pharmacology. Colorimetry. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Male. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists. Peptide Fragments / pharmacology. Radioimmunoassay. Rats. Rats, Wistar. Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide / antagonists & inhibitors. Sodium / urine. Substance P / analogs & derivatives. Substance P / pharmacology

  • HSDB. structure - CAPSAICIN.
  • HSDB. structure - SODIUM.
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  • (PMID = 18329285.001).
  • [ISSN] 1043-6618
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacological research : the official journal of the Italian Pharmacological Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharmacol. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK67620; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-57853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / HL-73287; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK067620-03; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL057853-07; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / R01 HL073287-04
  • [Publication-type] In Vitro; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists; 0 / Peptide Fragments; 0 / Receptors, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; 0 / TRPV Cation Channels; 0 / Trpv1 protein, rat; 119911-68-1 / calcitonin gene-related peptide (8-37); 129176-97-2 / spantide II; 33507-63-0 / Substance P; 83652-28-2 / Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide; 9NEZ333N27 / Sodium; LFW48MY844 / capsazepine; S07O44R1ZM / Capsaicin
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS48040; NLM/ PMC2394740
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57. ||||...... 41%  Feng Y, Sun X, Yang H, Teitelbaum DH: Dissociation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition: a mechanism for the loss of epithelial cell proliferation and villus atrophy. J Physiol; 2009 Feb 1;587(Pt 3):641-54
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  • [Title] Dissociation of E-cadherin and beta-catenin in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition: a mechanism for the loss of epithelial cell proliferation and villus atrophy.
  • Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) leads a loss of epithelial barrier function, decline in epithelial cell (EC) proliferation, and decreased expression of E-cadherin.
  • As a large portion of intracellular beta-catenin is tightly associated with E-cadherin, we hypothesized that the loss of E-cadherin would result in a redistribution of intracellular beta-catenin, and could be a contributing mechanism for this TPN-associated loss of EC proliferation.
  • An assessment of small bowel epithelium was performed in mice given either enteral nutrition (Control) or intravenous nutrition (TPN).
  • TPN significantly down-regulated E-cadherin and beta-catenin expression, and resulted in a loss of a colocalization of these factors.
  • TPN also up-regulated phosphorylated (p)-beta-catenin (Ser31/33,Thr41) and down-regulated (p)-beta-catenin(Ser552) expression.
  • To further address mechanisms driving this, we observed a significant decrease in the abundance of p-AKT and p-GSK3beta expression, and an associated decline in tcf-4 transcription factors (cyclin D1, c-myc and Axin2), as well as a loss of EC proliferation by 7 days.
  • To address whether the mechanism driving these changes was the absence of nutritional factors, glutamine was added to the TPN solution.
  • This resulted in a partial restoration of beta-catenin expression and EC proliferation, suggesting that an alteration in nutrient delivery may affect many of these changes.
  • Based on these findings, the loss of EC proliferation with TPN may well be due to a loss of total beta-catenin, as well as a concomitant change in the differential expression of beta-catenin phosphorylation sites, and a reduction in beta-catenin mediated tcf-4 transcription.
  • This potential pathway may well explain many of the findings of mucosal atrophy associated with TPN.
  • [MeSH-major] Cadherins / metabolism. Intestinal Mucosa / metabolism. Parenteral Nutrition, Total / adverse effects. beta Catenin / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Atrophy. Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors. Glutamine / metabolism. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 / metabolism. Humans. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Microvilli / metabolism. Microvilli / pathology. Nerve Tissue Proteins / genetics. Nerve Tissue Proteins / metabolism. Phosphorylation. Protein Processing, Post-Translational. Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt / metabolism. TCF Transcription Factors / genetics. TCF Transcription Factors / metabolism. Transcriptional Activation. alpha Catenin / genetics. alpha Catenin / metabolism

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  • (PMID = 19064618.001).
  • [ISSN] 1469-7793
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of physiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Physiol. (Lond.)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5P03 CA 46592; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 5R01 AI 044076-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Leucine Zipper Transcription Factors; 0 / Cadherins; 0 / Nerve Tissue Proteins; 0 / TCF Transcription Factors; 0 / Tcf4 protein, mouse; 0 / alpha Catenin; 0 / beta Catenin; 0RH81L854J / Glutamine; EC 2.7.11.1 / Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; EC 2.7.11.1 / glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta; EC 2.7.11.26 / Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2670086
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58. ||||...... 41%  Roy P, Buch AN, Javaid A, Okabe T, Raya V, Pinto Slottow TL, Steinberg DH, Smith K, Xue Z, Gevorkian N, Satler LF, Kent KM, Suddath WO, Pichard AD, Lindsay J, Waksman R: Impact of "off-label" utilization of drug-eluting stents on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Am J Cardiol; 2008 Feb 1;101(3):293-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Safety concerns have arisen from recent reports that suggested increased mortality and nonfatal myocardial infarction (MI) with DES usage.
  • The primary endpoint was major adverse cardiac events (cardiac death, nonfatal Q-wave myocardial infarction [MI], and target vessel revascularization) at 12 months.
  • There was no significant difference in freedom from cardiac death or nonfatal Q-wave MI between groups (p=0.27).
  • "Off-label" DES use was not associated with increased rates of cardiac death and nonfatal MI at 12 months.

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  • (PMID = 18237587.001).
  • [ISSN] 0002-9149
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of cardiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Cardiol.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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59. ||||...... 41%  Akey DL, Razelun JR, Tehranisa J, Sherman DH, Gerwick WH, Smith JL: Crystal structures of dehydratase domains from the curacin polyketide biosynthetic pathway. Structure; 2010 Jan 13;18(1):94-105
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  • [Title] Crystal structures of dehydratase domains from the curacin polyketide biosynthetic pathway.
  • Modular polyketide synthases (PKS) make novel natural products through a series of preprogrammed chemical steps catalyzed by an assembly line of multidomain modules.
  • Each assembly-line step involves unique extension and modification reactions, resulting in tremendous diversity of polyketide products.
  • Dehydratase domains catalyze formation of an alpha,beta-double bond in the nascent polyketide intermediate.
  • We present crystal structures of the four dehydratase domains from the curacin A PKS.
  • The catalytic residues and substrate binding site reside in a tunnel within a single monomer.
  • The positions of the catalytic residues and shape of the substrate tunnel explain how chirality of the substrate hydroxyl group may determine the configuration of the product double bond.
  • Access to the active site may require opening the substrate tunnel, forming an open trench.
  • The arrangement of monomers within the dimer is consistent among PKS dehydratases and differs from that seen in the related mammalian fatty acid synthases.
  • [MeSH-major] Cyclopropanes / metabolism. Hydro-Lyases / chemistry. Polyketide Synthases / chemistry. Thiazoles / metabolism
  • [MeSH-minor] Amino Acid Sequence. Biocatalysis. Crystallography, X-Ray. Models, Molecular. Molecular Sequence Data. Protein Multimerization. Protein Structure, Quaternary. Protein Structure, Tertiary. Sequence Alignment. Substrate Specificity

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  • (PMID = 20152156.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-4186
  • [Journal-full-title] Structure (London, England : 1993)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Structure
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA-108874; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / DK-42303; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA108874; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA108874-04; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK042303; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK042303-22; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076477; United States / NIGMS NIH HHS / GM / R01 GM076477-06
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cyclopropanes; 0 / Thiazoles; 155233-30-0 / curacin A; 79956-01-7 / Polyketide Synthases; EC 4.2.1.- / Hydro-Lyases
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS288082; NLM/ PMC3102235
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60. ||||...... 41%  Fang CY, Miller SM, Bovbjerg DH, Bergman C, Edelson MI, Rosenblum NG, Bove BA, Godwin AK, Campbell DE, Douglas SD: Perceived stress is associated with impaired T-cell response to HPV16 in women with cervical dysplasia. Ann Behav Med; 2008 Feb;35(1):87-96
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  • [Title] Perceived stress is associated with impaired T-cell response to HPV16 in women with cervical dysplasia.
  • BACKGROUND: Infection with high-risk subtypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is a central factor in the development of cervical neoplasia.
  • Cell-mediated immunity against HPV16 plays an important role in the resolution of HPV infection and in controlling cervical disease progression.
  • Research suggests that stress is associated with cervical disease progression, but few studies have examined the biological mechanisms that may be driving this association.
  • PURPOSE: This study examines whether stress is associated with immune response to HPV16 among women with cervical dysplasia.
  • METHODS: Seventy-four women presenting for colposcopy completed measures of health behaviors, stressful life events and perceived stress.
  • A blood sample was obtained to evaluate proliferative T-cell response to HPV16, and a cervical sample was obtained during gynecologic exam for HPV-typing.
  • RESULTS: More than 55% tested positive for one or more HPV subtypes.
  • Women who did not show proliferative responses to HPV (i.e. non-responders) were more likely to be HPV(+) compared to women who had a response (i.e. responders).
  • Consistent with study hypotheses, logistic regression revealed that higher levels of perceived stress were associated with a non-response to HPV16, controlling for relevant covariates.
  • Stressful life events were not associated with T-cell response to HPV.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of perceived stress are associated with impaired HPV-specific immune response in women with cervical dysplasia, suggesting a potential mechanism by which stress may influence cervical disease progression.
  • [MeSH-major] Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia / psychology. Human papillomavirus 16 / immunology. Papillomavirus Infections / psychology. Stress, Psychological / immunology. Uterine Cervical Dysplasia / psychology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Case-Control Studies. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Middle Aged. Reference Values. Severity of Illness Index. T-Lymphocytes / immunology

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  • (PMID = 18347908.001).
  • [ISSN] 0883-6612
  • [Journal-full-title] Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Behav Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / CA 006927; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K22 CA 107115; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K22 CA107115; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / K22 CA107115-03; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR 00240-34; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000240; United States / NCRR NIH HHS / RR / M01 RR000240-350488; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P30 AI 45008-07; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P30 AI045008; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / P30 AI045008-049006; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / P30 CA006927-45; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA 125069; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA125069; United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / R01 CA125069-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS37560; NLM/ PMC2396791
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61. ||||...... 41%  Zhang C, Feng Y, Yang H, Koga H, Teitelbaum DH: The bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway is upregulated in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition. J Nutr; 2009 Jul;139(7):1315-21
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  • [Title] The bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway is upregulated in a mouse model of total parenteral nutrition.
  • Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) results in intestinal mucosal atrophic changes due to an absence of enteral nutrition; however, the mechanisms responsible for this are not fully understood.
  • It has been shown that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) activation inhibits intestinal epithelial cell (EC) proliferation.
  • Therefore, we hypothesized that the BMP pathway could be upregulated by TPN.
  • To address this, we randomly assigned mice to receive TPN or to be enterally fed (control) for 7 d.
  • Mucosal EC isolates were harvested from the entire length of small intestine for RNA and protein measurements.
  • Full-thickness, mid-small bowel was processed for histological examination.
  • TPN increased the abundance of BMP2, BMP4, and BMP type II receptor at the RNA and protein levels.
  • Phosphorylation of Smad1, Smad5, and Smad8 also was greater in the TPN group than in the control, which helped to confirm activation of this pathway.
  • Interestingly, the TPN and control groups did not differ in the mRNA expression of the extracellular soluble bmp antagonists, noggin, gremlin, chordin, or follistatin.
  • Compared to the control group, the expression of c-Myc (cellular myelocytomatosis) mRNA was lower, whereas the level of p21(WAF1/CIP1) was greater, in the TPN group.
  • Because the BMP family may function through suppression of Wnt-beta-catenin signaling, this pathway was also examined. mRNA expression of Wnt 3, Wnt5a, and the Wnt receptor Lrp5 were lower in the TPN group compared to controls.
  • The results suggest that the BMP signaling pathway may be involved in the development of intestinal mucosal atrophy due to TPN administration.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 / genetics. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 / genetics. Bone Morphogenetic Proteins / physiology. Intestine, Small / physiology. Parenteral Nutrition, Total
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II / genetics. Dipeptides / pharmacology. Gene Expression Regulation. Glutamine / pharmacology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Models, Animal. Polymerase Chain Reaction. RNA / genetics. Reference Values. Signal Transduction

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  • (PMID = 19498022.001).
  • [ISSN] 1541-6100
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of nutrition
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Nutr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCI NIH HHS / CA / 5 P03 CA46592; United States / NIAID NIH HHS / AI / 5R01 AI044076-10
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Bmp2 protein, mouse; 0 / Bmp4 protein, mouse; 0 / Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2; 0 / Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4; 0 / Bone Morphogenetic Proteins; 0 / Dipeptides; 0RH81L854J / Glutamine; 63231-63-0 / RNA; EC 2.7.11.30 / Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II; U5JDO2770Z / alanylglutamine
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2696986
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62. ||||...... 41%  Dass CL, Walsh MF, Seo S, Shiratsuchi H, Craig DH, Basson MD: Irrigant divalent cation concentrations influence bacterial adhesion. J Surg Res; 2009 Sep;156(1):57-63
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  • [Title] Irrigant divalent cation concentrations influence bacterial adhesion.
  • BACKGROUND: Surgical wounds are frequently contaminated by microbes, but rarely become infected if the bacterial burden is low, and irrigation is used to reduce contamination.
  • Wound fluids are low in calcium and high in magnesium.
  • We hypothesized that manipulating irrigant divalent cation concentrations might influence bacterial adhesion.
  • METHODS: Staphylococcus aureus, E. coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were stained with fluorescent calcein AM before plating onto fibroblast monolayers, collagen I, or uncoated bacteriologic plastic.
  • After 1 h, wells were washed with HEPES-buffered pH-balanced sterile water without or with 5 mM CaCl(2), 5 mM MgCl(2), or 1 mM EDTA+EGTA, and the remaining adherent bacteria were assayed fluorometrically.
  • RESULTS: Supplementing the irrigation with magnesium or chelators increased but calcium-supplemented irrigation reduced bacterial adhesion to collagen or fibroblasts.
  • Nonspecific electrostatic bacterial adhesion to uncoated plastic was unaffected by calcium.
  • CONCLUSION: Bacterial adhesion to mammalian cells and matrix proteins is influenced by divalent cations, and pathogenic bacteria may be adapted to adhere under the low calcium high magnesium conditions in wounds.
  • Although these results await confirmation for other bacteria, and in vivo validation and safety-testing, they suggest that supplementing wound irrigation with 5 mM CaCl(2) may reduce bacterial adhesion and subsequent wound infection.
  • [MeSH-major] Bacterial Adhesion / drug effects. Calcium / pharmacology. Cations, Divalent / pharmacology. Magnesium / pharmacology. Surgical Wound Infection / prevention & control
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Cell Line. Chelating Agents / pharmacology. Edetic Acid / pharmacology. Egtazic Acid / pharmacology. Escherichia coli. Mice. Plastics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Staphylococcus aureus. Therapeutic Irrigation

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  • (PMID = 19577252.001).
  • [ISSN] 1095-8673
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of surgical research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Surg. Res.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771; United States / NIDDK NIH HHS / DK / R01 DK060771-08
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cations, Divalent; 0 / Chelating Agents; 0 / Plastics; 526U7A2651 / Egtazic Acid; 9G34HU7RV0 / Edetic Acid; I38ZP9992A / Magnesium; SY7Q814VUP / Calcium
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS107538; NLM/ PMC2730431
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63. ||||...... 41%  Stein GE, Schooley SL, Peloquin CA, Kak V, Havlichek DH, Citron DM, Tyrrell KL, Goldstein EJ: Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid in obese patients with cellulitis. Ann Pharmacother; 2005 Mar;39(3):427-32
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  • [Title] Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of linezolid in obese patients with cellulitis.
  • BACKGROUND: Linezolid is an oxazolidinone antimicrobial with excellent oral bioavailability and tissue penetration and is active against multidrug-resistant skin/soft tissue pathogens.
  • OBJECTIVE: To study the pharmacokinetics and antibacterial activity of linezolid against selective skin/soft tissue pathogens in obese patients.
  • METHODS: We obtained multiple serum samples from 7 obese patients (>50% over their calculated ideal body weight) receiving oral linezolid 600 mg every 12 hours for treatment of cellulitis.
  • Following a minimum of 3 doses, serum concentrations of linezolid were measured in each subject prior to (trough) and 1 and 6 hours after a dose.
  • These samples were then tested against clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (linezolid minimum inhibitory concentrations [MICs] 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 microg/mL) and one strain each of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) (MIC 2.0 microg/mL), Bacteroides fragilis (MIC 2.0 microg/mL), and Peptostreptococcus magnus (MIC 1.0 microg/mL).
  • Serum inhibitory titers (SITs) and bactericidal titers (SBTs) were measured at each time point, and the median activity for these 7 patients was calculated.
  • RESULTS: Mean linezolid serum concentrations were 4.2, 12.3, and 7.2 microg/mL at these respective time points.
  • Median SITs for 12 hours (100% of the dosing interval) were observed against each organism with the exception of the least susceptible strain of MRSA (MIC 4.0 microg/mL); serum inhibitory activity was observed only at the one-hour time point against this isolate.
  • Furthermore, prolonged (> or =6 h) median SBTs were observed against one isolate of MRSA (MIC 1.0 microg/mL) as well as the strain of VRE and P. magnus.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Serum concentrations of oral linezolid in this patient population were diminished compared with those of healthy volunteers, but still provided prolonged serum inhibitory activity against common pathogens associated with skin/soft tissue infections.
  • One treatment concern would be an obese patient receiving oral linezolid who was infected with a less susceptible (MIC > or =4.0 microg/mL) strain of S. aureus.
  • Bactericidal activity was also observed against selective pathogens.
  • [MeSH-major] Acetamides / pharmacology. Anti-Bacterial Agents / pharmacology. Cellulitis / drug therapy. Obesity / complications. Oxazolidinones / pharmacology. Skin Diseases, Bacterial / drug therapy. Soft Tissue Infections / drug therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Area Under Curve. Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial. Female. Half-Life. Humans. Male. Microbial Sensitivity Tests. Middle Aged. Serum Bactericidal Test

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  • (PMID = 15701775.001).
  • [ISSN] 1060-0280
  • [Journal-full-title] The Annals of pharmacotherapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Ann Pharmacother
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Acetamides; 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Oxazolidinones; 165800-03-3 / linezolid
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64. ||||...... 41%  Klaver D, Hung AC, Gasperini R, Foa L, Aguilar MI, Small DH: Effect of heparin on APP metabolism and Abeta production in cortical neurons. Neurodegener Dis; 2010;7(1-3):187-9
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  • [Title] Effect of heparin on APP metabolism and Abeta production in cortical neurons.
  • BACKGROUND: The beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is a major target for drug design in Alzheimer's disease.
  • BACE1 binds strongly to heparin and other glycosaminoglycans, and there is evidence that the enzyme may interact with proteoglycans in vivo.
  • Several studies suggest that heparin or heparan sulfate analogues may have value as therapeutic agents for the treatment of AD.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine whether heparin can inhibit Abeta production in cortical neurons by inhibiting BACE1.
  • METHODS: Cortical neurons from APP (SW) Tg2576 mice were incubated with heparin and the amount of APP processing and Abeta production were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blotting.
  • RESULTS: Treatment of cortical neurons with heparin inhibited Abeta secretion.
  • However, this effect was not mediated via inhibition of BACE1.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Heparin or other glycosaminoglycans may have value for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.
  • However, the data do not support the view that a heparin-induced decrease in Abeta secretion is due to inhibition of BACE1.
  • [MeSH-major] Amyloid beta-Peptides / metabolism. Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor / metabolism. Cerebral Cortex / cytology. Fibrinolytic Agents / pharmacology. Heparin / pharmacology. Neurons / drug effects
  • [MeSH-minor] Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases / metabolism. Animals. Animals, Newborn. Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases / metabolism. Cells, Cultured. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Gene Expression Regulation / drug effects. Humans. Mice. Mice, Transgenic

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
  • (PMID = 20224283.001).
  • [ISSN] 1660-2862
  • [Journal-full-title] Neuro-degenerative diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Neurodegener Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Amyloid beta-Peptides; 0 / Amyloid beta-Protein Precursor; 0 / Fibrinolytic Agents; 9005-49-6 / Heparin; EC 3.4.- / Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases; EC 3.4.23.- / Aspartic Acid Endopeptidases; EC 3.4.23.46 / Bace1 protein, mouse
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65. ||||...... 41%  Houlihan LM, Christoforou A, Arbuckle MI, Torrance HS, Anderson SM, Muir WJ, Porteous DJ, Blackwood DH, Evans KL: A case-control association study and family-based expression analysis of the bipolar disorder candidate gene PI4K2B. J Psychiatr Res; 2009 Dec;43(16):1272-7
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  • [Title] A case-control association study and family-based expression analysis of the bipolar disorder candidate gene PI4K2B.
  • Bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and recurrent major depression are complex psychiatric illnesses with a substantial, yet unknown genetic component.
  • Linkage of bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression with markers on chromosome 4p15-p16 has been identified in a large Scottish family and three smaller families.
  • Analysis of haplotypes in the four chromosome 4p-linked families, identified two regions, each shared by three of the four families, which are also supported by a case-control association study.
  • The candidate gene phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase type-II beta (PI4K2B) lies within one of these regions.
  • PI4K2B is a strong functional candidate as it is a member of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, which is targeted by lithium for therapeutic effect in bipolar disorder.
  • Two approaches were undertaken to test the PI4K2B candidate gene as a susceptibility factor for psychiatric illness.
  • First, a case-control association study, using tagging SNPs from the PI4K2B genomic region, in bipolar disorder (n=368), schizophrenia (n=386) and controls (n=458) showed association with a two-marker haplotype in schizophrenia but not bipolar disorder (rs10939038 and rs17408391, global P=0.005, permuted global P=0.039).
  • Second, expression studies at the allele-specific mRNA and protein level using lymphoblastoid cell lines from members of the large Scottish family, which showed linkage to 4p15-p16 in bipolar disorder and recurrent major depression, showed no difference in expression differences between affected and non-affected family members.
  • There is no evidence to suggest that PI4K2B is contributing to bipolar disorder in this family but a role for this gene in schizophrenia has not been excluded.
  • [MeSH-major] Bipolar Disorder / genetics. Family Health. Genetic Predisposition to Disease. Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor) / genetics. Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide / genetics
  • [MeSH-minor] Case-Control Studies. Female. Gene Frequency. Genome-Wide Association Study / methods. Genotype. Humans. Male. Schizophrenia / genetics

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  • (PMID = 19539307.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1379
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of psychiatric research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Psychiatr Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United Kingdom / Wellcome Trust / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Chemical-registry-number] EC 2.7.1.- / Phosphotransferases (Alcohol Group Acceptor); EC 2.7.1.67 / phosphatidylinositol phosphate 4-kinase
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2789249
  •  go-up   go-down


66. ||||...... 41%  Wallace JM, Rajachar RM, Allen MR, Bloomfield SA, Robey PG, Young MF, Kohn DH: Exercise-induced changes in the cortical bone of growing mice are bone- and gender-specific. Bone; 2007 Apr;40(4):1120-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Exercise-induced changes in the cortical bone of growing mice are bone- and gender-specific.
  • Fracture risk and mechanical competence of bone are functions of bone mass and tissue quality, which in turn are dependent on the bone's mechanical environment.
  • Male mice have a greater response to non-weight-bearing exercise than females, resulting in larger, stronger bones compared with control animals.
  • The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that short-term weight-bearing running during growth (21 days starting at 8 weeks of age; 30 min/day; 12 m/min; 5 degrees incline; 7 days/week) would similarly have a greater impact on cross-sectional geometry and mechanical competence in the femora and tibiae of male mice versus females.
  • Based on the orientation of the legs during running and the proximity of the tibia to the point of impact, this response was hypothesized to be greatest in the tibia.
  • Exercise-related changes relative to controls were assayed by four-point bending tests, while volumetric bone mineral density and cross-sectional geometry were also assessed.
  • The response to running was bone- and gender-specific, with male tibiae demonstrating the greatest effects.
  • In male tibiae, periosteal perimeter, endocortical perimeter, cortical area, medial-lateral width and bending moment of inertia increased versus control mice suggesting that while growth is occurring in these mice between 8 and 11 weeks of age, exercise accelerated this growth resulting in a greater increase in bone tissue over the 3 weeks of the study.
  • Exercise increased tissue-level strain-to-failure and structural post-yield deformation in the male tibiae, but these post-yield benefits came at the expense of decreased yield deformation, structural and tissue-level yield strength and tissue-level ultimate strength.
  • These results suggest that exercise superimposed upon growth accelerated growth-related increases in tibial cross-sectional dimensions.
  • Exercise also influenced the quality of this forming bone, significantly impacting structural and tissue-level mechanical properties.
  • [MeSH-major] Bone and Bones / anatomy & histology. Bone and Bones / physiology. Physical Exertion / physiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Animals. Biomechanical Phenomena. Bone Density. Bone Development / physiology. Female. Femur / anatomy & histology. Femur / physiology. Male. Mice. Mice, Inbred C57BL. Running / physiology. Sex Characteristics. Tibia / anatomy & histology. Tibia / physiology

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